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KISS Black History Month

This Week in Black History

A Special Message

Congressman David Scott’s Video Statement on Black History Month

13th District Congressman David Scott, who champions veterans, the homeless, the unemployed, breast cancer and so much more has a word for us for this Black History Month! Check out the video as Scott recites Langston Hughes' Mother to Son with passion and grace. It reminds us all to keep pushing for excellence in whatever station of life we find ourselves! Don't give up-keep pushin'!

Black History Headlines

Listen to “The Voices of King” podcast

Thirteen voices. Thirteen people who bore witness to the last days of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. On the 50th anniversary of King’s assassination, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reached into its archives to bring you stories from the people who knew him well and their unique witness to a tragic moment in American history.

In 2008, AJC reporters conducted a series of exclusive interviews with some of King’s closest friends and associates. These interviews are now presented in their entirety as The Voices of King. You can listen to the episodes at the links below, or go to the iTunes store to binge listen the entire series.

Follow the AJC’s extensive coverage of the 50th anniversary of King’s death, including:

The March 21 documentary 'The Last Days of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.' on Channel 2 kicked off a countdown of remembrance across the combined platforms of Channel 2 and its partners, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and WSB Radio

The three Atlanta news sources will release comprehensive multi-platform content until April 9, the anniversary of King’s funeral. 

On April 4, the 50th anniversary of Dr. King’s assassination, the three properties will devote extensive live coverage to the memorials in Atlanta, Memphis and around the country. 

The project will present a living timeline in real time as it occurred on that day in 1968, right down to the time the fatal shot was fired that ended his life an hour later. 

The project will culminate on April 9 with coverage of the special processional in Atlanta marking the path of Dr. King’s funeral, which was watched by the world.

Boston police apologize for honoring white man in Black History Month tweet

The Boston Police Department is apologizing Monday morning after it faced scathing backlash for honoring Red Auerbach, a white man, in a Black History Month tweet Sunday night.

>> February is Black History Month

The tweet posted to the Boston Police Department's account began by saying, “In honor of #BlackHistoryMonth,” but goes on to celebrate the accomplishments of Auerbach, who was white.

>> On Boston25News.com: Boston police facing backlash after tweeting Black History Month tribute to a white man

“We pay tribute to @celtics legend #RedAuerbach for being the 1st @NBA coach to draft a black player in 1950, field an all African-American starting five in 1964 and hire the league’s 1st African-American head coach (Bill Russell) in 1966,” the tweet read.

The tweet was deleted about an after it was posted after the backlash.

"Only in #Boston do the @bostonpolice honor Red Auerbach for #blackhistorymonth. So we already have the shortest month and now this," Boston City Councilor Tito Jackson tweeted Sunday night. "Please file this under Hell Nah aka Not Having it aka Not Ok. #bospoli #Boston #mapoli."

>> Read more trending news 

Boston police later tweeted out an acknowledgement of Bill Russell, then apologized for the Auerbach tweet just after midnight Monday.

“BPD realizes that an earlier tweet may have offended some and we apologize for that,” the tweet read. “Our intentions were never to offend. It has been taken down.”

– WFXT has reached out to the Boston Police Department for comment but has not yet head back.

 

Congressman David Scott’s Video Statement on Black History Month

13th District Congressman David Scott, who champions veterans, the homeless, the unemployed, breast cancer and so much more has a word for us for this Black History Month! Check out the video as Scott recites Langston Hughes' Mother to Son with passion and grace. It reminds us all to keep pushing for excellence in whatever station of life we find ourselves! Don't give up-keep pushin'!

Trump nominates Alveda King for Frederick Douglass commission

Alveda King, a niece of Martin Luther King Jr., and a staunch supporter of Donald Trump, has been nominated by the president to serve on the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commission. 

>> Read more trending news

The announcement comes roughly a year after Trump implied that Douglass, a former slave turned social reformer and abolitionist, was still alive. 

“Frederick Douglass is an example of somebody who’s done an amazing job and is getting recognized more and more, I notice,” Trump said at a 2017 Black History Month event. 

A year later, Trump is trying to get Douglass even more recognition, even though in the White House’s announcement of King’s appointment, Douglass’ name was spelled wrong among several editing errors: 

“The following individual to be a Member of the of the (sic) Frederick Douglas (sic)  Bicentennial Commission.” 

For a president who has been accused of racism, King has been one of his few African-American allies and a constant presence and advocate. 

“I do not believe President Donald John Trump is a racist. The economy’s up. Jobs are up in the black community,” she said in a January television interview about her uncle’s birthday. “There is great promise to get a lot of people who have been unfairly incarcerated out.” 

King, a stalwart Christian anti-abortion conservative, was by Trump’s side – along with HUD Secretary Ben Carson – last February when he visited the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African-American History and Culture

She was also on Air Force One last month when Trump signed a measure granting Georgia its first national historic park at the Martin Luther King Jr. National Historic Site near downtown Atlanta. 

“I believe Donald John Trump recognized sincerity for truth and justice for everyone and that is the basis of this appointment,” King told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “I am honored that I can serve America in this capacity.”

Without being specific, King said the commission will work this year to honor and highlight the work of Douglass, who was born a slave in Maryland on Feb. 20, 1819. 

Douglass escaped slavery in 1838, taught himself to read and became a gifted orator, forcefully speaking out against slavery. He wrote at least three autobiographies, championed the rights of black soldiers to fight in the Civil War, and was a confidante and friend of President Abraham Lincoln. 

Douglass died in 1895.

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