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Braves 3, Phillies 1

E_C.Santana (5), N.Williams (1). DP_Atlanta 1, Philadelphia 1. LOB_Atlanta 9, Philadelphia 7. 2B_Acuna (7), O.Herrera (10), Kingery (9). HR_Albies (14).

WP_McCarthy.

Umpires_Home, Lance Barrett; First, Tony Randazzo; Second, Bill Welke; Third, James Hoye.

T_3:18. A_18,545 (43,647).

Albies goes deep, McCarthy and Braves beat Phillies 3-1

PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Ozzie Albies hit his 14th homer, Brandon McCarthy tossed 5 2/3 sharp innings and the Atlanta Braves beat the Philadelphia Phillies 3-1 Tuesday night.

McCarthy (5-2) allowed one run and four hits with five strikeouts. He is 4-0 with a 2.08 ERA against Philadelphia this season and 1-2 with a 6.60 ERA against the rest of the league.

Vince Velasquez (4-5) gave up two runs - one earned - and fanned nine in 4 2/3 innings. He fell to 0-4 against the Braves.

The NL East's top two teams have already met 11 times, with Atlanta winning seven games.

Braves lefty A.J. Minter escaped a first-and-third, two-out jam in the eighth, retiring Jorge Alfaro on a fly to center. Arodys Vizcaino finished with a perfect inning for his ninth save in 11 tries.

Albies put the Braves in front with a solo shot in the third. The leadoff hitter is second behind Bryce Harper for most homers in the NL.

Sloppy defense by the Phillies helped Atlanta get another run in the fifth. Albies walked to start the inning. He advanced to third on Freddie Freeman's single after right fielder Nick Williams threw to an uncovered base because third baseman Maikel Franco was shifted. Freeman went to second on the play. Nick Markakis followed with a bouncer to first baseman Carlos Santana. His throw to the plate sailed over Alfaro's head for an error, allowing Albies to score.

Cesar Hernandez's RBI single in the bottom half cut it to 2-1. But McCarthy struck out Rhys Hoskins swinging to strand runners on second and third.

The Braves missed an opportunity in the fourth when they loaded the bases with no outs on a walk and two singles. Velasquez struck out Dansby Swanson, Ryan Flaherty and McCarthy - each went down swinging.

Ronald Acuna's RBI single in the ninth off Edubray Ramos drove in Albies to give the Braves an insurance run.

DIVISION DIFFERENCE

The Braves are 20-10 against NL East opponents. The Phillies are just 9-15.

TRAINER'S ROOM

Braves: RHP Anibal Sanchez (right hamstring strain) will make another rehab start for Triple-A Gwinnett on Saturday. Sanchez was roughed up Monday night, allowing eight runs in 3 2/3 innings against Durham.

Phillies: SS J.P. Crawford (right elbow strain) fielded grounders at extended spring training. ... RHP Pat Neshek (right forearm strain) played catch.

UP NEXT

RHP Jake Arrieta (3-2, 2.82 ERA) starts for the Phillies while LHP Luiz Gohara (0-0, 1.29 ERA) goes for the Braves. Arrieta is 3-1 with a 2.76 ERA in five career starts vs. Atlanta. Gohara struck out nine and allowed one run in seven innings in his only outing vs. Philadelphia last season and lost.

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More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball

Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle and Secretary of State Brian Kemp face a July runoff for GOP nomination for ...

ATLANTA (AP) - Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle and Secretary of State Brian Kemp face a July runoff for GOP nomination for Georgia governor.

Winning numbers drawn in 'All or Nothing Night' game

ATLANTA (AP) _ The winning numbers in Tuesday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's "All or Nothing Night" game were:

01-02-03-04-06-08-13-16-17-19-22-24

(one, two, three, four, six, eight, thirteen, sixteen, seventeen, nineteen, twenty-two, twenty-four)

The Latest: Beck, Laws win insurance commissioner primaries

The Latest on primary elections Tuesday in Georgia (all times local):

10:59 p.m.

Republican Jim Beck and Democrat Janice Laws have won their parties' primary elections for the office of Georgia's top insurance regulator.

Beck of Carrollton and Laws of Atlanta will face each other in the November general election to replace GOP Insurance Commissioner Ralph Hudgens.

Beck is Hudgens' former chief of staff and a lobbyist. He defeated two fellow Republicans - Hudgens' former top deputy, Jay Florence of Norcross, and pharmacist Tracy Jordan of Hoschton. Hudgens had endorsed Florence in the race.

Laws is an insurance agent who defeated fellow Atlanta Democrat Cindy Zeldin, a health care advocate.

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10:57 p.m.

Democrat Lindy Miller has been nominated to challenge a Republican incumbent to Georgia's utility-regulating Public Service Commission.

Miller of Decatur defeated two fellow Democrats in a primary election Tuesday for the PSC's District 3. She will face Republican incumbent Chuck Eaton in the November general election.

Eaton of Atlanta is seeking a third six-year term to the PSC. He ran unopposed in the GOP primary Tuesday.

The PSC regulates electrical and gas utilities in Georgia as well as other service providers. Though its commissioners run for assigned districts, they are elected by voters statewide. District 3 covers four metro Atlanta counties.

Miller is the co-founder of a solar energy company. She defeated fellow Democrats John Noel of Atlanta and Johnny White of Roswell.

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10:42 p.m.

A Republican congressman from Georgia has overcome a primary challenger in his metro Atlanta district.

Rep. Rob Woodall of Lawrenceville defeated Marine Corps veteran Shane Hazel of Cumming in the GOP primary Tuesday for the 7th Congressional District.

Woodall has held the seat since 2011. The district covers portions of Forsyth and Gwinnett counties outside Atlanta.

Six Democrats were also competing for a chance to oppose Woodall in the November general election.

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10:40 p.m.

Republican David Callahan will challenge a Democratic congressman for his metro Atlanta seat this fall.

Callahan of South Fulton won the GOP primary Tuesday in Georgia's 13th Congressional District. The victory advances him to the fall midterm election against U.S. Rep. David Scott of Riverdale. Scott was unopposed in the Democratic primary.

Callahan describes himself as a part-time driver and former printing company manager. He defeated fellow Republican Femi Akinkugbe of Stockbridge to win the GOP nomination to challenge Scott.

Scott has held the 10th District seat since 2003. The district covers portions of six counties in metro Atlanta.

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10:30 p.m.

Democrat Lisa Ring will face Republican U.S. Rep. Buddy Carter in the fall midterm elections in southeast Georgia.

Ring of Richmond Hill defeated Barbara Seidman of Waycross on Tuesday in the Democratic primary race for the 1st Congressional District. Ring is a former corrections officer and military spouse.

Carter of Pooler is seeking a third term this year in the district that includes portions of 16 Georgia counties from Savannah to the Georgia-Florida state line. Carter ran unopposed in the Republican primary Tuesday.

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10:10 p.m.

A freshman Georgia congressman has won his Republican primary race against a political newcomer.

U.S. Rep. Drew Ferguson of West Point defeated former Army officer and helicopter pilot Philip Singleton of Sharpsburg on Tuesday in western Georgia's 3rd Congressional District.

Ferguson is running his first re-election campaign since winning office in 2016 to replace retired GOP Rep. Lynn Westmoreland. The district includes portions of 13 counties along or near the Georgia-Alabama state line.

Delta Air Lines pilot Chuck Enderlin won the Democratic primary for the right to challenge Ferguson in the fall midterm election. Enderlin of Newnan defeated fellow high school science teacher Rusty Oliver of Columbus.

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9:55 p.m.

A Republican congressman has defeated a GOP primary challenger making his third attempt for a House seat in eastern Georgia.

Rep. Rick Allen of Augusta advanced to the fall midterm election Tuesday after beating fellow Republican Eugene Yu of Evans in the 12th Congressional District.

Allen has held the seat since 2015. Tuesday marked the third time Allen has run in a primary against Yu, a former sheriff's deputy and businessman who ran unsuccessful campaigns in 2014 and 2016.

Three Democrats are running for the party's nomination to challenge Allen in November. They are former Georgia NAACP president Francys Johnson of Statesboro, Augusta tax preparer Robert Ingham and construction company owner Trent Nesmith of Statesboro.

The 12th District covers portions of 19th counties in eastern Georgia and includes the cities of Augusta, Statesboro and Vidalia.

___

9:50 p.m.

A Republican congressman has defeated two primary challengers from his own party in eastern Georgia.

U.S. Rep. Jody Hice of Monroe advanced to the fall general election Tuesday. He beat fellow Republicans Bradley Griffin of Newborn and Joe Hunt of Watkinsville in the 10th Congressional District.

Hice is a Southern Baptist pastor from Monroe who has held the 10th District seat since 2015.

Three Democrats are running for a chance at taking on Hice in the fall election. They are Chalis Montgomery of Bethlehem, Richard Dien Whitfield of Athens and Tabitha Johnson-Green of Sandersville.

The 10th District covers portions of 25 counties in eastern Georgia and includes the cities of Athens and Milledgeville.

___

12:01 a.m.

Georgia voters have plenty of election contests to settle after casting their Republican and Democratic primary ballots for governor.

Both parties have competitive races Tuesday for lieutenant governor and secretary of state. Both of those offices are being vacated by GOP incumbents running for governor. The state insurance commissioner's seat is also open because the incumbent, Republican Ralph Hudgens, decided not to run again.

Meanwhile, state School Superintendent Richard Woods is battling for re-election against fellow Republican John Barge, who held the office before stepping aside four years ago to run unsuccessfully for governor.

Five Georgia congressmen also face primary opposition from within their own parties.

Several crowded races could require runoffs July 24 if no candidate finishes with more than 50 percent of the vote.

Stacey Abrams wins Dem primary in Georgia's gubernatorial race; she would be 1st black woman ...

ATLANTA (AP) - Stacey Abrams wins Dem primary in Georgia's gubernatorial race; she would be 1st black woman governor in the U.S.

Charles CJ Junior, former UGA wide receiver, dies at 57

BOGART, Ga. (AP) - Charles "CJ" Junior, a former wide receiver for the University of Georgia's 1981 national team, has died.

Batts & Bridges Funeral Home in Athens confirmed Junior died Tuesday in Bogart, Georgia. He was 57. Further details were not released, but according to a crowdfunding page created for him last year, Junior had been battling bladder cancer.

Junior played for the Bulldogs from 1979-1982, including the 1981 national championship team alongside teammate Herschel Walker. He had six receptions for 101 yards in his career. Junior earned a Bachelor of Science degree in education and worked for UGA for 20 years.

In 2000, he was inducted into the Waycross-Ware County Sports Hall of Fame, and was a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. and the Fraternal Order of Masons (Prince Hall).

The Latest: Democrats hear Rihanna; Republicans see Hammond

ATLANTA (AP) - The Latest on the gubernatorial primary in Georgia (all times local):

8:40 p.m.

Political candidates and their teams of advisers, spokespeople and assistants work hard to control their own message, right down to the music played at campaign events.

And in the race for Georgia's next governor, the differences in the leading candidates' musical affinities were striking.

On the Democratic side, former state House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams's election night party in downtown Atlanta featured tracks by Rihanna, Cardi B and John Legend.

Republican Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle's watch party in his hometown of Gainesville included a live performance by new-age country singer Tyler Hammond, known for his songs "Little Bit Crazy" and "Drunk Over a Girl."

___

6:30 p.m.

Polls are set to close across Georgia at 7 p.m. in Tuesday's primaries.

The results will set the stage for a contentious battle in November's general election, as Democrats try to chip away at Republican domination in the state.

Secretary of State Brian Kemp's office says voting has gone "smoothly," but they have opened four investigations, including one involving a delayed opening in Chatham County and another involving a poll worker in Seminole county. Kemp's office was not immediately able to provide more details.

All eyes are on the governor's race, the biggest prize of Georgia's statewide constitutional offices up for grabs.

Five Republicans and two Democrats are vying to replace term-limited Republican Gov. Nathan Deal, who has held the office since 2011.

___

5:40 p.m.

Hillary Clinton is urging Democrats in Georgia to make sure to vote in support of Stacey Abrams for governor.

Clinton recorded a 60-second endorsement used by the Abrams campaign in direct phone calls to Georgia voters. Tuesday's primary ballot election has Abrams facing fellow Atlanta Democrat Stacey Evans.

Clinton notes Abrams was the first black woman to serve as House Democratic leader in the Georgia legislature. Clinton also says Abrams has "a proven track record" of supporting public schools, gun safety, voting rights and Medicaid expansion.

A victory in the Democratic primary and in the November election would make Abrams the first black woman governor in the U.S.

Clinton's message also acknowledges the potential confusion caused by two Democratic rivals with the same first name. Twice, Clinton urges voters to support "Abrams with an 'A.'"

___

9:20 a.m.

Voting has started in Georgia's gubernatorial primary.

Five Republicans and two Democrats are vying to replace Republican Gov. Nathan Deal, who has held the office since 2011 and can't run again because of term limits.

Voting in Atlanta early Tuesday, independent consultant Jen Willsea said she's exciting about the possibility of Democratic House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams becoming the first black female governor in the Deep South state.

But small business owner Corbet Brown says he's voting for Democrat Stacey Evans, also a woman, because it's time for a change.

No matter whether Abrams or Evans wins, Georgia will get its first female Democratic nominee for governor.

___

7:25 a.m.

The Republican contest centered largely on who loved guns the most and was toughest on immigration, while the Democratic race was a battle of two former legislative colleagues tussling over ethics accusations and their records on education.

But in Tuesday's primary, voters will get the final say in who will represent each party in the race to become Georgia's next governor.

The two Democratic candidates include former state House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams and former state Rep. Stacey Evans, both Atlanta-area attorneys.

No matter which Stacey wins, she will be the first female Democratic gubernatorial nominee in Georgia.

The Republican field of five holds former legislators, officeholders and businessmen, some with decades of political experience and others positioning themselves as outsiders challenging the establishment.

The Republican candidates include Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle of Gainesville, Secretary of State Brian Kemp of Athens, former state Sen. Hunter Hill of Atlanta, state Sen. Michael Williams of Cumming and businessman Clay Tippins of Atlanta.

___

Sign up for "Politics in Focus," a weekly newsletter showcasing the AP's best political reporting from around the country leading up to the midterm elections: https://bit.ly/2ICEr3D

The Latest: Democrats hear Rihanna; Republicans see Hammond

ATLANTA (AP) - The Latest on the gubernatorial primary in Georgia (all times local):

8:40 p.m.

Political candidates and their teams of advisers, spokespeople and assistants work hard to control their own message, right down to the music played at campaign events.

And in the race for Georgia's next governor, the differences in the leading candidates' musical affinities were striking.

On the Democratic side, former state House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams's election night party in downtown Atlanta featured tracks by Rihanna, Cardi B and John Legend.

Republican Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle's watch party in his hometown of Gainesville included a live performance by new-age country singer Tyler Hammond, known for his songs "Little Bit Crazy" and "Drunk Over a Girl."

___

6:30 p.m.

Polls are set to close across Georgia at 7 p.m. in Tuesday's primaries.

The results will set the stage for a contentious battle in November's general election, as Democrats try to chip away at Republican domination in the state.

Secretary of State Brian Kemp's office says voting has gone "smoothly," but they have opened four investigations, including one involving a delayed opening in Chatham County and another involving a poll worker in Seminole county. Kemp's office was not immediately able to provide more details.

All eyes are on the governor's race, the biggest prize of Georgia's statewide constitutional offices up for grabs.

Five Republicans and two Democrats are vying to replace term-limited Republican Gov. Nathan Deal, who has held the office since 2011.

___

5:40 p.m.

Hillary Clinton is urging Democrats in Georgia to make sure to vote in support of Stacey Abrams for governor.

Clinton recorded a 60-second endorsement used by the Abrams campaign in direct phone calls to Georgia voters. Tuesday's primary ballot election has Abrams facing fellow Atlanta Democrat Stacey Evans.

Clinton notes Abrams was the first black woman to serve as House Democratic leader in the Georgia legislature. Clinton also says Abrams has "a proven track record" of supporting public schools, gun safety, voting rights and Medicaid expansion.

A victory in the Democratic primary and in the November election would make Abrams the first black woman governor in the U.S.

Clinton's message also acknowledges the potential confusion caused by two Democratic rivals with the same first name. Twice, Clinton urges voters to support "Abrams with an 'A.'"

___

9:20 a.m.

Voting has started in Georgia's gubernatorial primary.

Five Republicans and two Democrats are vying to replace Republican Gov. Nathan Deal, who has held the office since 2011 and can't run again because of term limits.

Voting in Atlanta early Tuesday, independent consultant Jen Willsea said she's exciting about the possibility of Democratic House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams becoming the first black female governor in the Deep South state.

But small business owner Corbet Brown says he's voting for Democrat Stacey Evans, also a woman, because it's time for a change.

No matter whether Abrams or Evans wins, Georgia will get its first female Democratic nominee for governor.

___

7:25 a.m.

The Republican contest centered largely on who loved guns the most and was toughest on immigration, while the Democratic race was a battle of two former legislative colleagues tussling over ethics accusations and their records on education.

But in Tuesday's primary, voters will get the final say in who will represent each party in the race to become Georgia's next governor.

The two Democratic candidates include former state House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams and former state Rep. Stacey Evans, both Atlanta-area attorneys.

No matter which Stacey wins, she will be the first female Democratic gubernatorial nominee in Georgia.

The Republican field of five holds former legislators, officeholders and businessmen, some with decades of political experience and others positioning themselves as outsiders challenging the establishment.

The Republican candidates include Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle of Gainesville, Secretary of State Brian Kemp of Athens, former state Sen. Hunter Hill of Atlanta, state Sen. Michael Williams of Cumming and businessman Clay Tippins of Atlanta.

___

Sign up for "Politics in Focus," a weekly newsletter showcasing the AP's best political reporting from around the country leading up to the midterm elections: https://bit.ly/2ICEr3D

NFL discussing possible steps to deal with anthem protests

ATLANTA (AP) - The NFL approved a new owner for the Carolina Panthers, passed a rule to eject players who hit with their helmets, and took steps to spice up the kickoff.

Still to be resolved: a much more contentious issue.

What to do, if anything, about players who kneel during the national anthem?

"We recognize with our visibility and the interest itself that it's taken a life of its own," Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said Thursday.

"We ask the world, 'Don't turn your head. Look at us. Wait a minute. Look at the NFL. Look at everything we're doing.' And then when we have some issues we've got to work through, we realize we've asked you to look.

"Let's do as good as we can do."

At their annual spring meeting, league owners welcomed David Tepper to their ranks by signing off on his record $2.2 billion deal to purchase the Panthers from disgraced team founder Jerry Richardson, who abruptly decided to sell after the NFL began investigating alleged sexual and racial misconduct in the workplace.

During a brief news conference in which he took only a handful of questions, Tepper immediately made a bit of news by seeming to imply he would be willing to listen to offers for a new stadium from other cities in North and South Carolina. The team has made no secret of its desire to replace 22-year-old Bank of America Stadium, and its lease runs only through the upcoming season.

"What's the name of the team? Carolina Panthers. It's going to be the Carolina Panthers," Tepper said. "And that means this team has to have some kind of presence in the Carolinas and last time I saw, how many are there? That's right, there's two of them."

But Tepper, a hedge fund owner who is worth a reported $11 billion, also reiterated several times that the largest city in the Carolinas is the "logical place for this team."

"As far as a new stadium, you're asking me too much and the only thing I have a market on now is lack of knowledge," he said. "I'll learn a lot more in the future."

Tepper's purchase was the first order of business at the luxury hotel in Atlanta's tony Buckhead neighborhood.

That was the easy part.

As a minority owner of the Pittsburgh Steelers, Tepper was already familiar to the league's owners and his approval was a mere formality. The vote was unanimous.

Anthem protests are a much thornier issue.

"We certainly want to make and will make a thought-out, deliberate decision," said Jones, who has made it clear he opposes kneeling during the anthem and was one of the few people to speak with reporters in the hotel lobby after the meeting broke up. "Whatever we do, let's put the focus on what the NFL's about and that's playing football."

The owners began discussing the issue - which has reached all the way to the White House - and will talk more before wrapping up their meetings Wednesday.

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick began kneeling during the national anthem in 2016, a quiet but powerful protest against police brutality and racial inequities in the justice system.

Other players took up the cause, and the gesture carried on during the 2017 season even after Kaepernick left the 49ers and failed to land a job with another team.

President Trump turned the anthem protests into a campaign issue , saying the NFL should fire any player who takes a knee during "The Star-Spangled Banner." The NFL hasn't gone that far, but Kaepernick has yet to land another job and one of his former teammates and fellow protesters, safety Eric Reid, is also out of work.

Both have filed collusion grievances against the NFL .

"I think there's certainly resolve and I can assure the issue is getting the very best of every owner and the very best look at all our constituencies with an eye first and foremost to our fans. That's No. 1," Jones said.

"We know our fans want us to zero in on football, and they don't want to think about or think that we're thinking about anything other than football."

The NFL was reportedly considering whether to assess a 15-yard penalty against any player who takes a knee or conducts any other protest during the anthem.

Another possible option would be to change up the pregame routine, keeping teams in their respective locker rooms until after the anthem has played.

That is the protocol long followed by college football, preventing anthem protests from being carried out in its stadiums.

The new kickoff rules are aimed at making the high-speed play a bit safer and perhaps more exciting.

Players on the kickoff team can't get a running start, while eight of the return team's 11 players must start out in a 15-yard zone near midfield, forcing them to run down the field alongside the coverage players. That will make the play more like a punt and should improve safety.

Wedge blocks - two blockers teaming up on the same player - will also be banned. In addition, any kick that hits the ground in the end zone will be an automatic touchback.

The new rules will be re-evaluated in 2019 to determine their effectiveness, but the league doesn't want to eliminate kickoffs altogether.

"It's part of the game," said Atlanta Falcons President and CEO Rich McKay, head of the league's competition committee. "If we can make plays more competitive and safer, we should do it."

In another attempt to improve safety, any player who initiates contact with his helmet is subject to ejection after an in-game video review that will be decided in New York.

Al Riveron, the league's head of officiating, said a foul can be called regardless of where on the body - not just the head or neck area - that one player hits another with his helmet. The rule is not position-specific, so offensive players will be subject to the same criteria as defensive players.

"This is about eliminating unnecessary use of the helmet," Riveron said.

If a player is ejected, Riveron and his staff in New York will use network camera angles to determine if the ejection is necessary. He promised that games will not become "an ejection fest" every week.

"Immediately when I learn in New York that there's an ejection, I will ask the network to give me everything you've got," Riveron said. "I will take a look at it, I will rule on it and I will say yes, he's ejected, (or) no, leave him in the game.'"

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Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963 . His work can be found at https://apnews.com/search/paul%20newberry

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For more AP NFL coverage: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFL

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