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UPDATE: Judge rules 30-year-old must move out after parents take son to court

Update May 23, 9:13 a.m. EST: A New York State Supreme Court judge ruled Tuesday that 30-year-old Michael Rotondo must move out of his parents’ house, WSTM reports.

Michael Rotondo represented himself in court and cited the case of Kosa v. Legg, that a there is a “common law requirement” to give a tenant six-month notice before they are removed through “ejectment action,” according to CNN.

>> Read more trending news 

New York State Supreme Court Judge Donald Greenwood disagreed.

“I’m granting the eviction,” he stated during court, CNN reports. “I  think the notice is sufficient.”

Rotondo told reporters outside courtroom that he plans to appeal the ruling. 

Original story: A New York couple is asking the Supreme Court of New York State to step in and help get their 30-year-old son to move out of their home. 

Christina and Mark Rotondo stated through court filings that they have been trying to get their son, Michael Rotondo, to move out of their Camillus home for several months, according to WSTM.

As evidence, the couple included five written notices to prove they have asked their son to leave, according to The New York Post

The couple gave Michael Rotondo the first notice on Feb. 2, giving him two weeks notice to move out. About two weeks later, Michael got a second warning, stating that he is “hereby evicted,” “effective immediately.”

In a third note sent five days later, the couple offered their son $1,100 to “find a place to stay,” WSTM reports. The note also included some advice, telling him to “organize the things you need for work and to manage an apartment.” 

It also suggested that he sell any items of significant value, including weapons: “You need the money and will have no place for the stuff,” WSTM reported. The note also stated: “There are jobs available even those with a poor work history like you. Get one - you have to work!”

In the end of the note, the couple stated, “your Mother has offered to help you find a new place to live.”

The fourth message included in court filings demanded that Michael Rotondo move out by a March 15 deadline, stating, “... we have seen no indication that you are preparing to leave” and they will “take any appropriate actions necessary to make sure you leave the house as demanded.”

In a fifth message, the couple addressed the issue of Michael Rotondo’s car, which was still parked outside the residence. 

In a response filed Wednesday, Michael Rotondo stated that the five notices did not give him a reasonable amount of time to move out.

He cited as precedent a “common law requirement of a six-month notice” before forcing someone to move out. 

Michael Rotondo’s court filing also stated that he lived in the home for eight years and in that time he was never asked to help out with chores or household expenses.

Rotondo also stated that his parents didn’t give him any reason why he needed to leave and claims they are retaliating against him, WSTM reports

He has asked the court to dismiss his parent’s request.

A hearing is scheduled for May 22. 

Stacey Abrams wins Georgia Democratic primary, seeks to become nation's 1st black female governor

Former Georgia House Minority Leader Stacey Abrams won the Democratic nomination for the state's top office on Tuesday, defeating ex-state Rep. Stacey Evans and advancing her quest to become the nation’s first black female elected governor. 

>> Watch the news report here

She will face one of two Republicans in November in the race to succeed Gov. Nathan Deal, a competition that will test whether the state is truly competitive after more than a decade of GOP rule. 

>> Midterm 2018: Here are the Senate races that you should be watching

“We are writing the next chapter of Georgia history, where no one is unseen, no one is unheard and no one is uninspired,” a jubilant Abrams said, adding: “And I know for the journey ahead, we need every voice in our party – and every independent thinker in the state.”

Abrams attracted national attention, big-name endorsements and millions of dollars in outside spending with her “unapologetic progressive” platform to flip the Georgia governor’s office for the first time since 2002. 

>> On AJC.com: Cagle, Kemp headed to runoff for GOP nomination

She overcame a stiff challenge from Evans, who tried to frame herself as the more ardent progressive. Evans fueled her campaign with nearly $2 million of her own money, pummeling Abrams with criticism for supporting a 2011 Republican-backed measure that cut awards to the HOPE scholarship. 

Each of the Democratic and Republican candidates tried to carve out his or her niche in a race that attracted more than $22 million in campaign contributions – and flooded the airwaves with more than $13 million in TV ads. 

>> Midterm 2018: House races you should be watching

Though her Republican opponent is not yet known – Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle will face Secretary of State Brian Kemp in a July 24 showdown – the Georgia GOP quickly attacked her over her financial background. 

“I’ve tried to make sense of her personal and professional finances, and my head is spinning,” said Georgia GOP chair John Watson, who called on her to release her tax returns and other financial records. 

Abrams owes more than $200,000 in debts, including about $54,000 to the IRS. She has said she’s on payment plan to pay back the debt, and has sought to frame her struggles as evidence she understands the problems that Georgians face.

>> Midterm elections 2018: When are the primaries? A state-by-state list

Evans, meanwhile, quickly endorsed Abrams and vowed to help Democrats form a united front against President Donald Trump and state Republicans.

"The Democratic Party is trying to find a unified voice to rally against Trump,” said Evans. “We must do that." 

Shifting strategy 

The Democrats largely abandoned centrist talk to appeal instead to left-leaning voters with a promise of implementing gun control, increasing financial aid for lower-income families and taking steps toward the decriminalization of marijuana.

That’s a stark contrast from more moderate appeals from a generation of Democratic candidates for governor, who often sought the National Rifle Association’s endorsement and touted fiscally conservative policies.

They are echoing many in the party’s base who insisted on that shift. Claudia Colichon, who lives in north Atlanta, said she demands candidates who embrace mass transit funding and fight for gun control.

>> Midterm 2018: What should you do if you are denied the right to vote? Here are some tips

“There needs to be a progressive change,” said Colichon. “People are seeing that conservative policies aren’t working.”

Abrams drew support from Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders and a string of other high-profile Democrats and raised about two-thirds of her campaign funds from outside the state. National groups chipped in another $2 million worth of ads supporting her. 

Evans mounted a lower-key campaign focused on local endorsements and smaller gatherings. The election-eve activities highlighted their differences. While Abrams held a large get-out-the-vote rally, Evans slung beers for supporters at an Atlanta bar. 

United and divided 

Both Abrams and Evans united around a host of issues, including expanding Medicaid, growing the medical marijuana program and continuing Deal’s criminal justice overhaul. And both are outspoken opponents of “religious liberty” measures they say amount to state-sponsored discrimination. 

The two attorneys also both were the products of hardscrabble childhoods that shaped their views of government, served together in the state House in their 30s and had up-close views of the tragic toll of substance abuse on their families with siblings who faced legal trouble.

But they’ve clashed on other issues, including how aggressively they oppose the NRA, how they would handle the state’s $26 billion budget and even how they would address Stone Mountain and other Civil War monuments

The biggest policy divide, however, centered on the HOPE scholarship, which provides tuition aid to Georgia college students who maintain a “B” average. 

Evans said Abrams betrayed her party by working with Republicans seeking cost-cutting moves to reduce the program’s awards in 2011. Abrams countered that more “seasoned” Democrats sided with her in that vote because they knew negotiating with the GOP would prevent deeper cuts. 

A new philosophy 

The other central disagreement in the race involved strategy. 

Evans banked on a more conventional Democratic plan to win over independent voters and moderates, particularly suburban women, who have fled to the GOP. Abrams staked her campaign on energizing left-leaning voters, including minorities who rarely cast ballots. 

The two competed for support in an increasingly diverse electorate and at times racial tensions surfaced. 

There was the moment last year when Abrams supporters shouted down Evans at an Atlanta conference of progressive activists with chants of “support black women.” Evans, who is white, drew scorn with a video at Ebenezer Baptist Church that faded her face into the image of Martin Luther King Jr.

For Democrats, the divisive primary for governor was somewhat novel. Jason Carter, the party’s 2014 nominee, faced no Democratic competition. And former Gov. Roy Barnes steamrolled over opposition in 2010 during his failed comeback bid. 

>> Read more trending news 

The party has also largely avoided fierce primary battles between black and white candidates for governor since the 1990 vote, when then-Lt. Gov. Zell Miller trounced former Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young. 

Evans, who represented a Smyrna-based district, faced an uphill battle from the moment she entered the race. Black women form the largest bloc of voters in the Democratic primary, and Abrams’ campaign predicted African-American turnout overall could make up 65 percent of the vote. 

To make inroads, Evans staged a slate of smaller rallies and meet-and-greets, and she relied heavily on prominent black officials to spread her message. She also spent far more heavily on TV than Abrams, inundating the airwaves with a HOPE-themed pitch. 

In her victory speech, Abrams moved to unite the party by praising Evans’ supporters. She pledged to repeal a campus carry law, expand the HOPE scholarship, improve workforce training programs and strengthen labor unions. 

And she tried to appeal to more centrist voters by saying she would be the “state’s public education governor” – emphasis on the word “public.” 

“Together we will shape a future with a boundless belief in the historic investment of children who are at the very core of every decision we make,” she said

– AJC staff writer Ariel Hart contributed to this report.

Too many returns lands some Amazon customers on banned list

Amazon is now following the lead of traditional retailers. 

The online shopping giant is banning customers who return too many purchases, The Wall Street Journal reported.

>> Read more trending news 

And in some cases, the company didn’t tell its customers why they were banned.

Nir Nissim told The Wall Street Journal that his account was closed earlier this year, claiming that he violated the conditions of use agreement. The email advised Nissim that he would not be permitted to open a new account or use another one to order with Amazon.

Nissim said he returned one item this year, a computer drive, and four last year. He also said he had a $450 gift card that became worthless. After contacting Amazon, even Chief Executive Jeff Bezos, he was eventually reinstated. He was told by an Amazon employee on behalf of Bezos, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Shira Golan was another customer who unexpectedly lost access after she was told she “reported an unusual number of problems.” Golan said she spends thousands of dollars a year with the retailer and that she has asked for refunds on clothing and shoes when they were damaged or wrong.

Amazon wouldn’t release how many customers have been banned because of having too many returns. But bans are not new for the retailer. In 2015, Paul Fidalgo was banned for returning smartphones over a short period of time. During the ban, Fidalgo not only couldn’t shop on the site, he also was not able to purchase any new content for his Kindle e-reader. Fidalgo though could read past content he had downloaded.

“It was dizzying and disorienting,” Fidalgo told The Wall Street Journal. “You don’t realize how intertwined a company is with your daily routine, until it’s shut off.”

Fidalgo was allowed back on Amazon after he received credits and asked the company how he could redeem them.

CNBC reached out to Amazon on how it picks accounts for closure after The Wall Street Journal report.

The company said:

We want everyone to be able to use Amazon, but there are rare occasions where someone abuses our service over an extended period of time. We never take these decisions lightly, but with over 300 million customers around the world, we take action when appropriate to protect the experience for all our customers. If a customer believes we’ve made an error, we encourage them to contact us directly so we can review their account and take appropriate action.

WATCH: Adoptive mom's heartwarming video shows older boys including shy son in basketball game

A video and message posted by a Green County, Oklahoma, mom is spreading quickly on social media.

>> Watch the news report here

Christy Rowden posted the video Monday afternoon after a heartwarming moment at a park.

>> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news 

Rowden said she was at the park with her two children that afternoon when a bus of students from Oologah Upper Elementary pulled up and started playing on the basketball court.

Rowden’s 7-year-old son was adopted from Uganda. Rowden said he can be shy and, as a result, stood back as the older boys played basketball.

>> Watch the video here

Soon after, the fifth-grade boys reportedly came up to her son, Asher, introduced themselves and invited him to play.

The boys quickly welcomed him into their game, cheering him on and giving high-fives.

>> Read more trending news 

Rowden said the moment brought a tear to her eye, especially since she is the mom of a black boy in a mostly white community.

Rowden shared the post to remind people that there is still good in the world and to thank the children who were so kind to her son.

>> See the Facebook post here

4-year-old mistakes gun for toy, shoots, kills little brother

A Virginia family is mourning the death of a 2-year-old boy after he was shot and killed by his 4-year-old brother.

Tyson Aponte was shot in the chest when his brother picked up what he thought was a toy. In reality it was a loaded gun, WTVR reported.

>> Read more trending news 

The children’s mother was home when the shooting happened Tuesday morning.

Tyson was taken to the University of Virginia Health System where he died, WCAV reported.

“It’s of paramount importance to make sure your guns are secured and out of the reach of children and everything,” Major Donald Lowe told WTVR. “At least have them unloaded or a safety lock on them, whatever you have to do to keep them from being discharged accidentally.”

Police are investigating.

“Our heart breaks for this family ... they’re devastated, naturally, so we want to do everything we can to help them,” Lowe told WTVR.

Man charged with murder in chase, crash that killed North Carolina trooper

A man wanted following a fatal crash involving a North Carolina Highway Patrol trooper has been captured.

>> Shooter dead in Panama City, Florida standoff, reports say

Authorities had been looking for 22-year-old Dakota Kape Whitt after Trooper Samuel N. Bullard, 24, of Wilkes County, died late Monday in a crash along Interstate 77 in Yadkin County during a chase.

WGHP-TV reports that during the chase, one trooper noticed he did not see a second patrol car behind him. When his attempt at contacting the other trooper failed, he turned around and found the patrol car engulfed in flames.

>> Read more trending news 

“Our SHP family is devastated by the loss of Trooper Bullard. We are struggling to find words that describe the hurting we feel right now,” said Col. Glenn M. McNeill Jr., commander of the State Highway Patrol. “Trooper Bullard died as he was fulfilling his promise to the people of North Carolina, protecting and serving his community.” 

It happened around 11:30 p.m. on I-77 southbound near NC-67. The area is about 70 miles north of Charlotte and due west of Winston-Salem.

>> No leads in fatal drive-by shooting of grandmother; police asking for public’s help

Chris Knox with the NCSHP said Bullard was a three-year veteran assigned to Surry County.

Troopers said the incident started with a license check. A black BMW did not stop and troopers went after it. Trooper Bullard was involved in a collision at Mile Marker 80.

Whitt was taken into custody without incident around 3:30 a.m. Wednesday. He's charged with murder, felony fleeing to elude arrest in a motor vehicle and driving with a revoked license. 

Philip Roth dead at 85: Writers, public figures remember Pulitzer Prize-winning author

Philip Roth – the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "American Pastoral" and other highly acclaimed works such as "Portnoy's Complaint," "The Human Stain" and "The Plot Against America" – has died of congestive heart failure, The Associated Press reported late Tuesday. He was 85.

>> PHOTOS: Notable deaths 2018

Fellow writers and public figures took to Twitter to share their condolences and reflect on Roth's novels. Here's what they had to say:

>> Read more trending news 

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Aaron Hernandez’s fiancee Shayanna Jenkins announces pregnancy

The late Aaron Hernandez's fiancee, Shayanna Jenkins, announced Tuesday that she's expecting another child.

Jenkins took to Instagram to announce the pregnancy and didn't reveal who the father of the baby is.

>> Read more trending news 

"Many of you have had speculated that I may be expecting another miracle which is very accurate," Jenkins wrote in her Instagram post. "We are beyond excited about the new addition and chapter we will soon begin."

Jenkins revealed she'd be having another daughter, saying she "couldn’t be a luckier woman to have such a perfect little girl that’s prepared to become the best big sister, and even more blessed to welcome another baby girl to our home."

On Boston25News.com: 'He could've been saved,' Shayanna Jenkins tells Dr. Phil

The pregnancy comes just over a year after Hernandez's death, when he hanged himself in prison on April 19, 2017.

Hernandez's suicide note to Jenkins featured him calling her his "soul-mate" and saying she would be "rich" after his death.

Mom with cancer sees twin daughters graduate in special ceremony before her death

When twin sisters Morgan and Regan McVey graduate Thursday from Talawanda High School in Oxford, Ohio, it will actually be their second commencement ceremony.

Earlier this year, the school provided a special moment for the seniors and their mother, who was diagnosed with cancer last fall.

As the school year moved into its second semester, it was evident their mother, Carey McVey, would not live to see the graduation ceremony.

>> WATCH: Texas teen walks for first time in months, stuns prom date in heartwarming viral video

“Mr. (Tom) York and others arranged to give us a mini graduation ceremony,” Regan said of the school’s principal. “We had our caps and gowns and got our actual diplomas. Mom got to see them.”

“That was one thing she wanted to see,” Morgan added.

Their mother died in February. She was 43 years old, according to her obituary.

The diplomas were on a table at their home until last week when they were returned to the school so the seniors could receive them again at Thursday’s ceremony.

>> Read more trending news 

The gesture, the twins said, reinforced their decision to attend the Oxford school.

The McVey twins were unknown to their classmates when they started at Talawanda High School four years ago after finishing the eighth grade at Queen of Peace School.

“We had to make new friends here. We did not know anyone,” Morgan McVey said.

The high school choice took some discussion between the sisters.

“Regan wanted to go to Talawanda. I wanted to go to Badin,” Morgan said.

Now, they both said they are happy with their decision.

“The school really supported us through it all,” Morgan said, referring to her mother’s cancer diagnosis and her death.

>> On Journal-News.com: Oxford community advocate ‘lived life to the fullest’

While the family tragedy will forever be linked to their senior year of high school, they said they did not let it affect their personalities or interactions with others, although classmates were often surprised by that.

“We are always happy. We joke around a lot. We talk a lot. People forget. Then they say, ‘Your mother… .’ It’s definitely been an experience,” Regan said.

Both young women have been cheerleaders all four years of high school and both have been involved in dance all four years, with Regan on homecoming court her junior year and prom court this spring.

Both, also found satisfaction in passing on their own love of dance by teaching it to younger children at area dance studios.

The fact they are twins earned them a memorable experience outside of school, too.

As their senior year dawned, they appeared in a television commercial promoting the Big Ten conference. The theme of the promo was twins and they auditioned last spring in Chicago, which led to a two-day video shoot, also in Chicago.

>> On Journal-News.com: New gateways to welcome Miami U., Oxford visitors

The commercial appeared on the Big Ten Network and ESPN as well as other television channels. For Morgan, it was a strange feeling the first time she saw it aired.

“I did not know it was out. I was in bed with my television on and saw my face. It just popped up,” she said.

They said they are thinking about using it as a stepping stone to doing some modeling, but they know that profession is a difficult one to get into and then only lasts a certain time. They are planning a careful route of going to college to train for teaching professions and then see what happens.

Regan McVey is looking at early childhood education while Morgan is opting for a degree in integrated language arts for grades 7-12. They plan to attend Miami University Hamilton in the fall to start their college careers.

>> On Journal-News.com: Hall of Famer Huismann approved as Talawanda’s head girls hoop coach

Morgan said no one in their family teaches, but she hopes to emulate some of the good teachers she has had at Talawanda.

Regan opts for younger students after her work with young dancers.

“I like little kids. I think it’s interesting to teach them when they are young,” she said.

The sisters are among 21 members of the graduating class recognized with the President’s Award for Educational Achievement.

The twins agree high school at Talawanda has been a great experience. Their mother and their father, Shane, were both Talawanda High School graduates.

Photos: Notable deaths 2018

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