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Stormy Daniels on '60 Minutes': 5 revelations from the interview

Adult film star Stormy Daniels spoke to Anderson Cooper about her alleged 2006 affair with Donald Trump in a highly anticipated interview that aired Sunday on "60 Minutes."

>> Watch the full interview here

Here are five things we learned:

>> Stormy Daniels: Complete interview transcript

1. Daniels said she had sex with Trump one time in 2006. She said the encounter with the then-"Apprentice" host occurred in his hotel suite after she met him at a Lake Tahoe celebrity golf tournament.

"He goes, ‘Got an idea, honey bunch. Would you ever consider going on and being a contestant?'" Daniels said. "And I laughed and said, 'NBC's never gonna let, you know, an adult film star be on.' ... 'No, no,' he goes, 'That's why I want you. You're gonna shock a lot of people. You're smart and they won't know what to expect.'"

Later, she said she went to the restroom and found him "on the edge of the bed when I walked out, perched."

"I realized exactly what I'd gotten myself into," Daniels said. "And I was like, 'Ugh, here we go.' And I just felt like maybe – it was sort of – I had it coming for making a bad decision for going to someone's room alone, and I just heard the voice in my head, 'Well, you put yourself in a bad situation and bad things happen, so you deserve this.'"

Daniels said that although she was not attracted to Trump, she consented to the sex. They kept in touch about the possibility of appearing on "Celebrity Apprentice" but did not have sex again, she said.

"I thought of it as a business deal," she said.

>> Stormy Daniels on '60 Minutes': Cast of characters

2. She does not consider herself a "victim." "This is not a #MeToo," she said. "I was not a victim. I've never said I was a victim. I think trying to use me to further someone else's agenda does horrible damage to people who are true victims."

>> Former Playboy Playmate Karen McDougal files lawsuit to speak about alleged Trump affair

3. Daniels said a man threatened her in 2011 after she made a deal to sell her story to an In Touch sister publication. "I was in a parking lot, going to a fitness class with my infant daughter – taking, you know, the seats facing backwards in the backseat, diaper bag, you know, getting all the stuff out – and a guy walked up on me and said to me, 'Leave Trump alone. Forget the story.' And then he leaned around and looked at my daughter and said, 'That's a beautiful little girl. It'd be a shame if something happened to her mom.' And then he was gone," Daniels said.

She said didn't call the police because she was scared and would "instantly" recognize the man if she ever saw him again.

Brent H. Blakely, an attorney for Trump lawyer Michael Cohen, shot back against Daniels' claim Sunday night in a letter to Daniels' attorney, Michael Avenatti, according to a tweet by Maggie Haberman of The New York Times.

"In truth, Mr. Cohen had absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with any such person or incident, and does not even believe that any such person exists, or that such incident ever occurred," the letter said.

>> See Haberman's tweet here

>> Porn star Stormy Daniels sues Trump over hush agreement, says it’s void, reports say

4. Daniels said she signed previous statements denying the affair because she "felt intimidated and honestly bullied." 

"And I didn't know what to do, and so I signed it even though I had repeatedly expressed that I wouldn't break the agreement," she said. "But I was not comfortable lying."

When asked whether the previous denials hurt Daniels' credibility, Avenatti responded: "I think there's no question that it calls into question her credibility. I also think that there's no question that when the American people take all of the facts and evidence into consideration, that they are going to conclude that this woman is telling the truth."

>> Read more trending news 

5. Daniels stayed mum on whether she has messages, photos or other evidence of the alleged affair. "I can't answer that right now," she said, adding, "My attorney has recommended that I don't discuss those things."

The comment aired days after her attorney tweeted a photo of a mysterious DVD.

"If 'a picture is worth a thousand words,' how many words is this worth????? #60minutes #pleasedenyit #basta," Avenatti wrote Thursday

>> See his tweet here

In the "60 Minutes" interview, Cooper asked Avenatti whether he was bluffing.

"You should ask some of the other people in my career when they've bet on me bluffing," Avenatti said.

March for Our Lives: Emma Gonzalez stands in silence for Parkland victims, stuns crowd

Emma Gonzalez, a survivor of last month's deadly school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, has used her words to advocate for gun reform and gain a national audience. But on Saturday, her silence spoke louder.

>> Watch the moment here

>> School district arms students, teachers with rocks in case of school shooting

"Six minutes and about 20 seconds," Gonzalez said onstage at the March for Our Lives rally in Washington, D.C. "In a little over six minutes, 17 of our friends were taken from us, 15 were injured, and everyone – absolutely everyone – in the Douglas community was forever altered.

>> March for Our Lives: See what the rally looked like from outer space

"Everyone who was there understands," she continued. "Everyone who has been touched by the cold grip of gun violence understands. For us, long, tearful, chaotic hours in the scorching afternoon sun were spent not knowing. No one understood the extent of what had happened. No one could believe that there were bodies in that building waiting to be identified for over a day. No one knew that the people who were missing had stopped breathing long before any of us had even known that a code red had been called. No one could comprehend the devastating aftermath or how far this would reach or where this would go. For those who still can't comprehend because they refuse to, I'll tell you where it went: right into the ground, 6 feet deep. 

>> MLK’s 9-year-old granddaughter, Yolanda Renee King, rallies crowd at March for Our Lives

"Six minutes and 20 seconds with an AR-15, and my friend Carmen would never complain to me about piano practice. Aaron Feis would never call Kira 'Miss Sunshine.' Alex Schachter would never walk into school with his brother, Ryan. Scott Beigel would never joke around with Cameron at camp. Helena Ramsey would never hang out after school with Max. Gina Montalto would never wave to her friend Liam at lunch. Joaquin Oliver would never play basketball with Sam or Dylan. Alaina Petty would never. Cara Loughran would never. Chris Hixon would never. Luke Hoyer would never. Martin Duque Anguiano would never. Peter Wang would never. Alyssa Alhadeff would never. Jamie Guttenberg would never. Meadow Pollack would never."

>> PHOTOS: March for Our Lives

Gonzalez then fell silent as the crowd looked on. That silence lasted more than four minutes as she and the crowd tearfully paid tribute to the victims. 

>> Read more trending news 

"Since the time that I came out here, it has been 6 minutes and 20 seconds," she said after an alarm rang from the podium. "The shooter has ceased shooting and will soon abandon his rifle, blend in with the students as they escape and walk free for an hour before arrest. Fight for your lives before it's someone else's job."

March for Our Lives: See what the gun reform rally looked like from outer space

An image that shows what the crowds at Saturday's March for Our Lives rally in Washington, D.C., looked like from space is going viral.

>> See the photo here

>> School district arms students, teachers with rocks in case of school shooting

In the image, captured just before noon Saturday by the DigitalGlobe WorldView-2 satellite, protesters fill the streets of the nation's capital. The Washington Post posted the photo in a tweet shared by thousands and liked by more than 14,000 people as of Sunday morning.

>> PHOTOS: March for Our Lives

According to The Hill, nearly 800,000 people attended the D.C. rally, where gun control advocates called for action following the deadly school shooting in Parkland, Florida, last month. Protesters also organized rallies in several major cities across the country, including Atlanta, Boston and New York.

>> Read more trending news 

Read more here.

Trump: 'Crazy Joe Biden' would 'go down fast and hard' in a fight

President Donald Trump took to Twitter early Thursday to slam Joe Biden over controversial comments that the former vice president made at a rally Tuesday.

>> Read more trending news 

Without a voice, DC reporter Jamie Dupree's work still resonates across the US

A familiar Cox Radio voice is determined to be heard again.

>> On WSBTV.com: Cox DC bureau reporter loses voice in medical mystery

Cox Media Group Washington correspondent Jamie Dupree has spent more than three decades covering Capitol Hill, but nearly two years ago, his method of communication had to change.

>> The radio silence of Jamie Dupree

Doctors say a rare neurological condition is making it difficult for his brain to tell his tongue what to do while speaking. Placing a pen in his mouth helps him speak.

“It’s hard, but I am working to come back hard,” Dupree tells WSB Radio.

>> Read Jamie Dupree's Washington Insider blog here

He is now hoping a meeting with specialists at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta will help him figure out why he lost his voice. 

And the reporter in him has not quit.

“He still does interviews; he feeds us audio,” WSB Radio News Director Chris Camp says. Dupree also covers Congress via Facebook, Twitter and Cox Media Group websites. 

>> DC reporter Jamie Dupree honored on House floor

“He may not be able to talk, but boy you can hear him awful loud,” Camp adds.

Dupree is thankful to all who have wished him well. While the condition has obviously affected his job, that is not what he says hurts him the most.

“Think about not being able to talk to your kids, or your wife or your father or your friends. While my work is hard and different, life is about a lot more than that.”

>> WATCH: WSB-TVs Berndt Petersen speaks with Jamie about his struggle over the past couple years

Dupree says Emory researchers are trying a new treatment that will slow down the movement of his tongue to make it easier for him to speak. In the meantime, Jamie wants everyone to know his overall health is good.

“Even though he can't speak, Jamie is still the most trusted voice in Washington DC,” WSB Radio’s Bill Caiaccio says of his colleague and friend. “He was already the hardest working reporter in our nation’s capital, and now he works even harder to get the job done.”

WSB Radio anchor Chris Chandler echoes those sentiments, saying, "I've always said Jamie is the most valuable on-air presence on our stations, and he still is.

“There's not a word of news from Washington that he hasn't reported and broken down for us.”

Mark Arum, WSB Radio traffic anchor and talk show host, adds that Dupree is an invaluable resource: “He might have lost his voice, but he still has the drive to get the story and get it right.”

>> Read more trending news 

Sabrina Cupit, who anchors midday for WSB Radio, says Dupree is so much more than his voice: “His knowledge of Washington, his connections, his balanced reporting; they are all still a major part of what we do on air every day here at WSB.

“Personally, I have never met a kinder, more honest or just downright great human being in my life. I am praying for the return of his voice. I do miss hearing it.”

Get Dupree's take on what's happening in Washington delivered to your inbox every weekday by clicking here.

Jamie Dupree is a reporter for the Cox Media Group Washington News Bureau. 

Former Playboy Playmate Karen McDougal files lawsuit to speak about alleged Trump affair

Former Playboy model Karen McDougal is suing to break a 2016 contract that reportedly requires her to keep silent about an affair with Donald Trump years before he became president.

>> For the latest Trump coverage, visit Jamie Dupree’s Washington Insider blog

In the complaint — which was obtained by The New York Times — McDougal’s lawyers allege that she had a “10-month relationship with Mr. Trump” in 2006. They say McDougal decided to pursue a lawsuit because “she has become aware of the broad effort to silence and intimidate her and others.”

The former Playmate is suing in the Los Angeles Superior court, and she’s charging American Media Inc. with paying her $150,000 for her story, then killing it. American Media Inc. owns the National Enquirer, which has been friendly to Trump during his candidacy and tenure in the White House.

McDougal also claims that Trump lawyer Michael Cohen was involved in the deal and that she was misled in the proceedings.

>> Read more trending news 

She is the second woman to accuse the president’s personal lawyer of paying her to keep silent about an extramarital relationship with Trump. McDougal says she was paid $150,000 for her silence — earlier this year, the Wall Street Journal outlined payments Cohen made to porn star Stormy Daniels. Both women claim that their affairs with Trump occurred in 2006, after he married Melania Trump.

Daniels is currently being sued by Cohen, who claims that she violated the confidentiality agreement she signed in 2016. Daniels' story doesn’t look like it’s ending anytime soon, as she’s lined up for an interview with “60 Minutes.”

Parents of bullies could face $500 fine if Pennsylvania bill becomes law

A Pennsylvania lawmaker has introduced legislation that could have parents footing the bill if their child bullies another kid at school.

>> Watch the news report here

It started out as a rule in Sharpsburg.

>> On WPXI.com: Parents face fines in new anti-bullying ordinance

WPXI checked with the police officer who enforces the law and he said it is working as a deterrent.

He also said it's raised awareness of how serious bullying is, and the potential consequences.

After Brentwood and Sharpsburg passed local anti-bullying ordinances that fine parents of bullies, a state lawmaker is proposing more encompassing legislation.

State Rep. Frank Burns' bill gives parents three strikes. He's from Cambria County.

>> Read more trending news 

The first time a child bullies someone, the school is required to inform his or her parents how it handled the situation. If it happens a second time, parents would have to take a class on bullying and attend a bullying resolution conference.

The third time, parents would receive a court citation and pay up to a $500 fine.

In a statement issued last week, the Democrat said bullying can lead to physical assaults and suicide.

He said holding students, parents and officials accountable "is the only way to put an end to this scourge."

The proposal also includes an anonymous bullying reporting system requiring the state education department to track bullying incidents and file monthly reports.

Sharpsburg police have yet to file any citations against parents.

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Ohio lawmaker's bill to name Labrador retriever state dog gets 'ruff' response from PETA

Ohio State Rep. Jeff Rezabek wants to name the Labrador retriever as the official state dog, but People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals would rather that the American mutt get the special designation.

>> PHOTOS: Official state dogs

PETA, an animal rights group with 6.5 million members, fired off a letter to Rezabek, R-Clayton, to tell him that his well-intentioned legislation could end up hurting Labradors.

>> Read more trending news 

Puppy mills would cash in on the demand, while Ohio’s animal shelters would see an uptick in Labradors when new owners discover that they’re expensive, time-consuming and in need of training, according to PETA.

>> On DaytonDailyNews.com: Patio pooch? Bills would let restaurants decide whether to allow dogs

“The last thing that Ohio’s already severely crowded animal shelters need is a deluge of yet another type of dog,” said PETA President Ingrid Newkirk in a written release. “If Ohioans’ hearts are set on naming an official state dog, PETA suggests the humble, healthy and 100 percent lovable all-American mutt.”

>> On DaytonDailyNews.com: Vicious dogs: Ohio moves to change laws on dog owners

Rezabek introduced the Labrador bill earlier this month, and it has yet to receive a hearing. He said he had not yet seen the letter from PETA.

Death penalty for some drug dealers part of Trump opioid plan, report says

President Donald Trump's proposal to fight the nation's growing opioid epidemic reportedly includes pursuing the death penalty for some drug traffickers. 

According to Reuters, Trump will detail his plan – which calls for stronger penalties for dealers, fewer opioid prescriptions, and improvements to drug education and access to treatment – Monday in New Hampshire.

>> Read more trending news 

Andrew Bremberg, Trump's domestic policy director, said the Justice Department "will seek the death penalty against drug traffickers when it's appropriate under current law," Reuters reported. The death penalty currently can be sought for some drug-related murders, the news service reported.

Read more here or here.

NYT: Democrat Conor Lamb wins PA’s special election, beating Rick Saccone in a Trump stronghold

Update March 14, 2018 7:35 p.m EDT: Democrat Conor Lamb has won Pennsylvania’s special election in the 18th Congressional district, beating Republican Rick Saccone in a GOP stronghold by a thin margin of just over 600 votes, according to The New York Times, which called the election late Wednesday.

Republicans have not conceded the election and are likely to demand a recount, the Times reported.

Update March 14, 2018 2:32 p.m. EDT: Sources told WPXI’s Rick Earle that the Republican party has hired an independent firm to look for voting irregularities in Tuesday’s special election.

Although unofficial results for the race put Democratic candidate Conor Lamb just a few hundred votes ahead of his Republican rival for the 18th Congressional District seat, Rick Saccone, a recount of the vote is unlikely. If the race was one that was statewide, it would trigger an autmoatic recount, as less than .5 percent separates Lamb and Saccone’s tallies. The same rules don’t apply to congressional races.

 >> On WPXI.com: Why there may not be a recount in the 18th Congressional District race

A recount can only happen if three or more voters from each precinct petition for a recount due to fraud or errors in the vote counting.

Update March 14, 2018 12:50 a.m. EDT: Democratic candidate Conor Lamb has declared victory over opponent Rick Saccone in the closely watched special election in Pennsylvania for the 18th Congressional District seat.

>> Visit WPXI.com for complete coverage of this developing story

Saccone has not conceded.

The Pennsylvania Secretary of State's election results website currently has Lamb with a 113,111-112,532 edge in votes. However, there are still an unclear number of absentee, provisional and military ballots to count.

>> Read more trending news 

ORIGINAL STORY: Polls have closed in the special election for the 18th Congressional District, a race that has drawn national attention and is seen by some as a referendum on President Donald Trump.

Political newcomer Conor Lamb showed strength in fundraising and the polls for Democrats, who are seeking to control a seat that has been primarily Republican for decades. 

The GOP pinned its hopes to Rick Saccone, a four-term state representative who has tied himself very closely to Trump throughout the campaign.

The seat opened in October when longtime representative Tim Murphy resigned amid a scandal.

The district, which stretches through parts of Greene, Allegheny, Washington and Westmoreland counties, could change by May after the state Supreme Court threw out the electoral map in January, saying it was unconstitutional. 

The court issued a new map intended to take effect by the May primaries, although Republicans have challenged that map in court.

The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

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