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Posted: January 15, 2017

WSB Radio host's daughter raises money in his memory

Amira Marshall honors the memory of her father Royal by participating in her school's fundraising event for the American Heart Association.  She was the top fundraiser at Woodward Academy this year. Pictured with WSB Radio's Veronica Waters.
Annette Marshall
Amira Marshall honors the memory of her father Royal by participating in her school's fundraising event for the American Heart Association.  She was the top fundraiser at Woodward Academy this year. Pictured with WSB Radio's Veronica Waters.

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            WSB Radio host's daughter raises money in his memory
Years ago, Amira Marshall stopped by her father's workplace, WSB Radio.  Pictured with WSB's Veronica Waters.

By Veronica Waters and Edgar Treiguts

WSB Radio

ATLANTA —

Amira Marshall has a fond memory of her father. 

“Every day after school, he would make me and my sister strawberries,” she says through tears.

It’s one of the few memories the now 10-year-old has of her late dad, Royal Marshall.  That’s because Amira was only four when he fell victim to a heart attack, on January 15, 2011. 

The loss was one also taken hard by the WSB Radio family.  Royal was a beloved colleague, serving roles as talk show host of "The Royal Treatment," producer, and sidekick to Neal Boortz on his show. 

Amira still recalls vividly that terrible night her father passed away at the young age of 43.

"I kind of remember the ambulance running in, the day that he had died," says Amira, her voice breaking, "and I remember my mom calling me to go downstairs and get the phone for her." 

But she has taken the tragedy and turned it into a mission, commemorating her father’s memory by participating in the Jump Rope for Heart fundraiser, benefitting the American Heart Association.  She did it first last year when the event was held at her school, Woodward Academy.  The day the students jumped rope fell on the fifth-year anniversary of Royal's death.     

Amira was the tops in fundraising at Woodward, bringing in more than $3,000.  And that was fifth-best in the Southeast.  She hopes to repeat it this year--but not for the accolades.

“It’s important to me because first I want to honor my dad, and second because I wouldn’t want anyone else feeling like I did,” Amira tells WSB’s Veronica Waters.  “It’s a very sad feeling and I wouldn’t want anyone to feel like that.”

Her fundraising page says, "I want to help others with special hearts and keep kids like me active."  

Amira’s advice? 

“Do your part to save a heart.”  

Click here to donate.


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