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With tears, tattoos, Prince fans remember him a year later

For Prince fans, the one-year anniversary of his shocking death from an accidental drug overdose is a time for sadness and celebration.

It was a year ago Friday that the music superstar was found dead at Paisley Park, the suburban Minneapolis recording complex where he lived.

Fans from around the globe have flocked to Paisley Park, now a museum, for a four-day celebration that includes performances by Prince's former bandmates and panel discussions. Fans who didn't want to pop for a $549 ticket to get into Paisley could head to a street party outside First Avenue, the club he made famous in "Purple Rain." And the Minnesota History Center is staging a special exhibit of Prince memorabilia, including his iconic "Purple Rain" costume.

Here's a look at how some of Prince's fans are remembering his legacy and mourning his loss.

A 6-HOUR DRIVE FOR PRINCE

Mary Adams and her 10-year-old daughter, Rachel, visited First Avenue on Friday to pose for a picture in front of Prince's star, repainted from silver to gold soon after his death.

The duo drove six hours from Kansas City, Missouri, listening to Prince the whole way.

"I needed to come here," said Adams, 50. "This is where it began."

Adams grew up listening to Prince. After he died, she got her first tattoo — Prince's glyph adorned with open lilies — on her arm.

"He'll always be with me now," she said.

Adams said Prince's tenacity and drive to do things his own way helped Adams, an actor, realize it was OK to be herself.

"He inspired me to be me, and I love him for it — and I always will," she said, choking up.

She planned pilgrimages to the Minneapolis house made famous in the movie "Purple Rain" and to Prince's old neighborhood. She and her daughter went to Paisley Park but weren't allowed to leave a memorial — a purple lei and a card — at the fence outside.

"This should be a time when we should all be able to go there and pay our respects and say our goodbyes — and it feels like you have to pay a small fortune to get in, and it breaks my heart," she said.

"I don't think he would dig that."

FEELING THE LOSS

Malinda Listenbee, 46, of Huntsville, Alabama, wore a Prince shirt as she and her husband Ulton waited to enter Paisley Park.

She recalled hearing about Prince's death a year ago by overhearing nurses talk about it while at a doctor's appointment. She said it felt like she lost a family member.

"He was a caring person, a giving person, and it just felt like I knew him," she said.

The couple had already been to Paisley Park once, in November, when they took a VIP tour and played on Prince's ping-pong table.

"I feel like this is a time to celebrate," she said. "This is a happy space."

PRINCE'S PURPLE ARMY

Rhonda Soso, of Compton, California, was among fans shooting pictures outside Paisley Park. She wore a pendant of Prince's symbol, which she had also spray-painted in black along the legs of her white pants.

Soso said she was there "just to be part of the purple family, the purple army."

She said it was difficult to no longer have Prince, but "his spirit, his energy is still with us."

LOCALS LOVE THEIR PRINCE

Liz Larson, 36, of Minneapolis, stopped by the star outside First Avenue on her way to work Friday to pay her respects.

She said her mother was a singer in the 1980s and would sometimes hang out with Prince at First Avenue. Larson remembers being at concerts there herself when Prince would suddenly show up to play.

Prince's music "was something you could always put on if you wanted to make people dance at a party," she said. "It would always shift the mood."

Larson felt isolated last year when Prince died — traveling on business with co-workers who didn't share her grief. This year, she planned to be at First Avenue's dance party Saturday with her husband and 6-month-old son — in a Prince onesie.

Ryan Matson, 39, of Ramsey, also stopped by Prince's star to get a photo. He said he had always liked his music, but "after he died, you started liking his songs all over again."

He planned to go home after work, have a few beers and watch "Purple Rain."

__

Baenen reported from Chanhassen, Minnesota. Associated Press writer Steve Karnowski contributed.

The Latest: Prince fans join 'purple family' at Paisley Park

The Latest on the anniversary of Prince's death (all times local):

9:15 a.m.

A few fans are starting to gather outside Paisley Park on the anniversary of megastar Prince's death.

Rhonda Soso traveled from Compton, California, to shoot photos on a sunny Friday morning of the recording-complex-turned-museum in suburban Minneapolis where Prince lived and died.

Soso is in Chanhassen for a four-day celebration of Prince's life and music that started Thursday at Paisley Park. She wore a Prince symbol pendant and had spray-painted the symbol in black along the legs of her white pants.

Soso says she is here "just to be part of the purple family, the purple army." She says it's difficult knowing that Prince is no longer here, but that "his spirit, his energy is still with us."

Prince died one year ago of an accidental fentanyl overdose.

___

12:30 a.m.

For Prince fans, the one-year anniversary of his shocking death from an accidental drug overdose will be a time for sadness and celebration.

It was a year ago Friday that the music superstar was found dead at Paisley Park, the suburban Minneapolis recording complex where he lived.

At Paisley Park, which has been turned into a museum, a full four days of events are on tap, ranging from concert performances by Prince's former bandmates to panel discussions. Fans who can't afford those high-priced tickets can head to a street party outside First Avenue, the club he made world famous in "Purple Rain." And the Minnesota History Center is staging a special exhibit of Prince memorabilia, including his iconic "Purple Rain" suit.

Sylvia Moy, Motown songwriter and producer, dies at age 78

Motown songwriter Sylvia Moy, the storied recording studio's first female producer who penned or collaborated on several hits, including Stevie Wonder's "My Cherie Amour" and Marvin Gaye's "It Takes Two," has died in suburban Detroit. She was 78.

Moy died Saturday at a hospital in Dearborn from complications from pneumonia, her brother, Melvin Moy, told The Associated Press on Thursday.

Sylvia Moy started her career as a singer, but she knew she had the ability to write songs and produce at the hit-making Detroit recording studio — something her brother said was atypical at the time.

"We're talking about the 1960s," he said. "Racism and sexism — that was what was going on in the '60s, and certain disciplines relative to the music business were taboo for women."

Motown founder Berry Gordy gave Moy her first shot, but with a catch: She had to come up with something for a young Stevie Wonder.

"He was in puberty and his voice had changed," Melvin Moy said. "Other producers couldn't find something that fit."

But Sylvia Moy found something. She and Wonder worked on different chord progressions until they found a vibe they both thought could be developed.

"Then she worked on the lyrics and the melodies, and bam! It was a hit," her brother said.

That hit was "Uptight (Everything's Alright)," which peaked at No. 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1966, after its release in late 1965.

Inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2006, Moy was Motown's first female producer and "pioneered some really, really unique things for women," said Motown arranger and musician Paul Riser.

Riser said she was a great song and lyric writer, a classical vocalist, sang opera and taught other vocalists. She later moved from songwriting into producing and arranging, and eventually opened her own recording studio in Detroit.

In addition to her brother, Sylvia Moy is survived by another brother and five sisters. Her funeral will be held this weekend in Detroit.

Prince home state marks death anniversary with celebrations

For Prince fans, Friday's one-year anniversary of his shocking death from an accidental drug overdose will be a time for sadness and celebration.

At his Paisley Park home and recording studio-turned-museum, a full four days of events are on tap, ranging from concert performances by his former bandmates to panel discussions. Fans who can't afford those high-priced tickets can head to a street party outside First Avenue, the club he made world famous in "Purple Rain." And the Minnesota History Center is staging a special exhibit of Prince memorabilia, including his iconic "Purple Rain" suit.

Here's a look at how Prince's home state will honor his legacy and mourn his loss:

PAISLEY PARK

Prince's home base in the Minneapolis suburb of Chanhassen is marking the anniversary with a roster of shows from artists such as his old band The Revolution, Morris Day and the Time and New Power Generation. Also on the docket: panel discussions featuring such speakers as his old band mates — think Lisa (Coleman) and Wendy (Melvoin) from "Purple Rain" and The Revolution — along with many more.

Fans who could afford it spent $999 for VIP passes for the Paisley schedule, and the estate said those were sold out. A relatively cheaper option — $549 general admission passes — was still available midweek.

Prince's siblings, who are on track to inherit an estate valued around $200 million, are hosting an all-night dance party in the Minneapolis suburb of Golden Valley with Dez Dickerson, Apollonia Kotero, Andre Cymone and others.

FIRST AVENUE

The downtown Minneapolis club where Prince filmed key parts of "Purple Rain" is hosting late-night dance parties Friday and Saturday with tracks from the late superstar.

A memorial street party outside the club is also on tap for Saturday. It will be reminiscent of the one that drew thousands of mourners on the night of Prince's death to cry, dance and sing along.

PIECES OF HISTORY

Prince's "Purple Rain" costume — purple jacket, white ruffled shirt and studded pants — was put out for display at the Minnesota History Center in St. Paul through Sunday. The museum is also marking the anniversary by featuring handwritten lyrics to an unreleased song, "I Hope We Work It Out," signed by Prince in 1977. Prince performed it for record executives when he first signed with Warner Bros.

PAINTING THE TOWN PURPLE

Several landmarks in Minneapolis will be lit up in Prince purple, including U.S. Bank Stadium, Target Field, the IDS Center, and the Interstate 35W and Lowry Avenue bridges over the Mississippi River.

Documentary delves into life of music pioneer Clive Davis

Clive Davis celebrated his legacy with the debut of a documentary about his life, along with performances from artists he helped become icons, during the opening night of the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival.

Davis, 85, said it was a dream come true to launch "Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives" at Radio City Music Hall since he grew up in Brooklyn and didn't visit Manhattan until he was 13.

The music mogul was all smiles at the multi-hour event Wednesday night, as performers like Aretha Franklin, Carly Simon, Barry Manilow and Earth, Wind & Fire took the stage to pay tribute to Davis.

"All of them fresh from not performing at the inauguration," Robert De Niro, who co-founded the festival, said before the film began, earning laughs and handclaps from the audience.

Jennifer Hudson left the stage to walk into the aisles to dance with the crowd as she sang Whitney Houston's "I Wanna Dance With Somebody."

"Where is Clive at?" she yelled. Davis earned a loud cheer from the audience when he started dancing.

When Franklin — who closed the show — sang "Natural Woman," she pointed to Davis and sang the lyrics, "He makes me feel." She also called her longtime collaborator a "chieftain" and "humanitarian."

Others shared the sentiment on-screen. "The Soundtrack of Our Lives," directed by Chris Perkel, gave a peek into Davis' personal and professional life. He lost his parents while he was an undergraduate at New York University, and later attended Harvard Law School. After working as a lawyer for Columbia Records, he was promoted to president in 1967, despite not desiring a career in music.

"I had no inkling that music would be my passion of life," he said in an interview with The Associated Press on Tuesday from his office at the new Sony building in Manhattan. "I had no money after my parents died, so I went through school on scholarships. And I was going to be a lawyer."

He said watching the documentary was somewhat hard, especially scenes with Houston, who died in 2012.

"It was very emotional to see artists that I worked with 20, 30, 40 years ago have the same vivid memories of how we interrelated and what we worked on and issues that arose," he said. "It certainly gives a very compelling picture of the relationship that I had with Whitney Houston and of course that's filled with emotional impact, and it really showed sides of Whitney that no one has ever seen before."

Davis went on to become the world's most popular music executive, discovering talents such as Houston, Alicia Keys and Manilow and creating second acts for legends like Franklin and Santana. He even had a large role in shaping the careers of Bruce Springsteen, Janis Joplin and Billy Joel.

"What a movie," Manilow yelled before he sang some of his popular hits.

Other performers included Kenny G and Dionne Warwick, who earned a standing ovation after she hit a high note. Whoopi Goldberg worked as the emcee in between the performances.

"No matter who you voted for, fight for the arts in school please," she told the audience. "This is in our hands now."

Davis founded Arista Records in 1975 and J Records in 2000. His documentary will be available on Apple Music.

_____

Online:

http://www.clivedavis.com/

Prince's 1980s band hits the road for memorial tour

For members of Prince's 1980s backing band The Revolution, reuniting and hitting the road for a spring U.S. tour is how they are coping with the "Purple Rain" pop superstar's unexpected death a year ago.

"We're taking it to the people who are grieving like we are, and letting them have a little bit of relief," guitarist Wendy Melvoin, sitting on a couch with other members of the band during a break at their Minneapolis rehearsal space, said Wednesday.

When Prince died of an accidental painkiller overdose, members of The Revolution were mourning at a Minneapolis hotel and made an impromptu video, promising to reunite for shows honoring their one-time flamboyant front man. After three sold-out shows at the fabled First Avenue nightclub (the setting of Prince's hit 1984 movie "Purple Rain") in September, The Revolution is back, preparing to kick off a tour Friday at Paisley Park in the Minneapolis suburb of Chanhassen on the anniversary of Prince's death.

The tour includes stops in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New York, Cleveland, Detroit, Los Angeles and San Francisco before ending in Seattle on July 15.

Melvoin is joined by bassist BrownMark, keyboardists Matt Fink and Lisa Coleman, and drummer Bobby Z. The reunited Revolution plans to play Prince's synthesizer-heavy 1980s music through his lauded 1987 double album "Sign o' the Times."

"We have the ability now to give people a glimpse of what we experienced with him," BrownMark said. "And I think that's a powerful thing. I know it helped me heal."

While Prince had a reputation as a perfectionist, members of The Revolution remember the good times goofing in the studio.

"We had fun. We had a lot of fun. Sometimes we would be rehearsing and we'd crack up, we'd just laugh for an hour, cracking jokes," BrownMark recalls.

"We'd go play softball," keyboardist Fink said. "'OK, we're not going to rehearse today, let's go play softball.'"

After years of recording and touring with The Revolution, Prince "did what any boss would do and just put it (the band) to bed," Bobby Z. said.

"That intense run we had, all those years, it was starting to come apart at the seams, with personalities and under that kind of pressure, just like human beings do, and he just kind of made a decision," the drummer said. "And he wanted to move on as basically a solo artist with a backing band, no disrespect. But this was a band he was a very critical member of."

Whether The Revolution will continue beyond this tour is an open question.

"We'd love to be able to see if there are some legs with this," Melvoin said.

___

Follow Jeff Baenen on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jeffbaenen.

1 year after Prince's death, another turn for The Revolution

For members of Prince's 1980s backing band The Revolution, reuniting and hitting the road for a spring U.S. tour is how they are coping with the "Purple Rain" pop superstar's unexpected death a year ago.

"We're taking it to the people who are grieving like we are, and letting them have a little bit of relief," guitarist Wendy Melvoin, sitting on a couch with other members of the band during a break at their Minneapolis rehearsal space, said Wednesday.

When Prince died of an accidental painkiller overdose, members of The Revolution were mourning at a Minneapolis hotel and made an impromptu video, promising to reunite for shows honoring their one-time flamboyant front man. After three sold-out shows at the fabled First Avenue nightclub (the setting of Prince's hit 1984 movie "Purple Rain") in September, The Revolution is back, preparing to kick off a tour Friday at Paisley Park in the Minneapolis suburb of Chanhassen on the anniversary of Prince's death.

The tour includes stops in Chicago, Washington, D.C., New York, Cleveland, Detroit, Los Angeles and San Francisco before ending in Seattle on July 15.

Melvoin is joined by bassist BrownMark, keyboardists Matt Fink and Lisa Coleman, and drummer Bobby Z. The reunited Revolution plans to play Prince's synthesizer-heavy 1980s music through his lauded 1987 double album "Sign o' the Times."

"We have the ability now to give people a glimpse of what we experienced with him," BrownMark said. "And I think that's a powerful thing. I know it helped me heal."

While Prince had a reputation as a perfectionist, members of The Revolution remember the good times goofing in the studio.

"We had fun. We had a lot of fun. Sometimes we would be rehearsing and we'd crack up, we'd just laugh for an hour, cracking jokes," BrownMark recalls.

"We'd go play softball," keyboardist Fink said. "'OK, we're not going to rehearse today, let's go play softball.'"

After years of recording and touring with The Revolution, Prince "did what any boss would do and just put it (the band) to bed," Bobby Z. said.

"That intense run we had, all those years, it was starting to come apart at the seams, with personalities and under that kind of pressure, just like human beings do, and he just kind of made a decision," the drummer said. "And he wanted to move on as basically a solo artist with a backing band, no disrespect. But this was a band he was a very critical member of."

Whether The Revolution will continue beyond this tour is an open question.

"We'd love to be able to see if there are some legs with this," Melvoin said.

___

Follow Jeff Baenen on Twitter at https://twitter.com/jeffbaenen .

Prince left behind a treasure trove to see at Paisley Park

One visit to the sprawling Minnesota recording complex that Prince called home may not be enough.

Paisley Park, in the Minneapolis suburb of Chanhassen, opened as a museum in October, just six months after the "Purple Rain" megastar died there of a painkiller overdose. Prince left behind more than 7,000 artifacts, including costumes and shoes, and more than 121 guitars and instruments.

Paisley Park spokesman Mitch Maguire said the Oscar- and seven-time Grammy Award-winning musician did archivists a favor because he would "seemingly hang onto everything." That allows the museum to switch archival pieces out, so fans coming back for tours will have a new experience.

Among the items planned for future exhibits are the red wool hat Prince wore during an all-star jam at the 2004 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony and a blue Stratocaster guitar Prince played during part of his legendary 2007 Super Bowl halftime show.

A four-day celebration of Prince will be held April 20-23 at Paisley Park during the anniversary of his death.

Documents highlight Prince's struggle with opioid addiction

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at Paisley Park on April 21. Nearly a year after his accidental overdose death at his suburban Minneapolis studio and estate, investigators still don't know how he got the fentanyl that killed him. The newly unsealed documents give the clearest picture yet of Prince's struggle with opioid painkillers.

___

WHAT DO AUTHORITIES SAY HAPPENED?

Investigators heard plenty from the people at Paisley Park when Prince's body was discovered. They told investigators that Prince was recently "going through withdrawals, which are believed to be the result of the abuse of prescription medication."

When authorities later checked a database set up to monitor who's getting prescriptions for controlled substances, they found nothing for Prince. But there was a prescription for the opioid painkiller oxycodone written for Kirk Johnson, Prince's bodyguard.

The prescription was dated April 14, 2016, the same day Prince was revived with an anti-overdose drug after falling ill on a plane. Dr. Michael Schulenberg, who wrote the prescription, told authorities he put the prescription in Johnson's name to protect Prince's privacy, according to a detective's affidavit. Schulenberg's attorney, Amy Conners, said in a statement that Schulenberg never prescribed opioids to Prince directly nor to another person with the intent of giving them to the singer.

Johnson's attorney, Clayton Tyler, said Johnson "did not secure nor supply the drugs which caused Prince's death." An autopsy showed Prince died of an overdose of fentanyl, another drug in the opioid family.

___

WHAT ARE POTENTIAL CHARGES?

Writing a prescription under another person's name violates state and federal law, said Ruth Martinez, executive director of the Minnesota Board of Medical Practice.

Martinez said she could not comment on whether the board is investigating Schulenberg's treatment of Prince. The agency's website on Monday listed no disciplinary or corrective actions taken against the doctor.

The board doesn't launch investigations unless someone makes a complaint. Complaints typically take 90 to 120 days to resolve, she said.

A person convicted under the law could be stripped of the ability to prescribe controlled substances by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and face other discipline from the state medical board.

___

WHY NO CHARGES YET?

A year might seem like a long time without charges, but criminal justice experts say the fact that no one's been charged doesn't mean no one ever will. They say it's a complex thing to track illegally obtained pills, and investigators and prosecutors want to build strong cases before interviewing witnesses who might provide useful information.

Although they can resort to subpoenas, the targets can exercise their right against self-incrimination — and the only way to get them to talk after that is by offering immunity. And, experts say, prosecutors and investigators don't want to lose a high-profile case such as Prince's — likely increasing their caution.

___

HOW OFTEN DO PRESCRIBERS USE FALSE NAMES?

Martinez of the Minnesota medical board said it's "quite infrequent" for a doctor to write out a prescription for someone in another person's name.

Two Los Angeles attorneys say it happens all the time in Hollywood. Celebrities frequently use aliases in hospitals and doctor's offices.

Laws against prescribing with a false name are not usually enforced when a doctor intends to protect a celebrity's privacy, said Los Angeles attorney Ellyn Garofalo.

She represented a doctor who was acquitted of all charges, including false name allegations, in the death of Anna Nicole Smith, the Playboy model and reality TV star who died of an accidental overdose in 2007.

"They would be indicting every pharmacist in Beverly Hills if this were strictly enforced," Garofalo said Monday.

Los Angeles criminal defense attorney Harland Braun said there are good reasons for doctors to want to protect privacy with the insatiable appetite for celebrity gossip.

"Say you have a major male actor who has a prescription for Viagra, do you want that out on TMZ?" Braun said.

___

Amy Forliti and Doug Glass contributed from Minneapolis.

Prince search warrants lay bare struggle with opioids

Court documents unsealed in the investigation into Prince's death paint a picture of a man struggling with an addiction to prescription opioids and withdrawal, with various pills stashed in bottles around the pop superstar's suburban Minneapolis studio and estate.

But the search warrants and affidavits unsealed Monday shed no new light on how Prince got the fentanyl that killed him.

The documents were unsealed in Carver County District Court as the yearlong investigation into Prince's death continues. They show authorities searched Paisley Park, cellphone records of Prince's associates, and Prince's email accounts to try to determine how he got the fentanyl, a synthetic opioid drug 50 times more powerful than heroin.

The documents don't reveal answers to that question, but do provide the most details yet seen on Prince's struggle with addiction to prescription opioids in the days before he died.

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate on April 21. Just six days earlier, he passed out on a plane and had to be revived with two doses of a drug that reverses the effects of an opioid overdose.

Associates at Paisley Park also told investigators that Prince was recently "going through withdrawals, which are believed to be the result of the abuse of prescription medication," an affidavit said.

The documents unsealed Monday allege Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg, a family physician who saw the musician twice last April, told authorities he prescribed the opioid painkiller oxycodone to Prince but put it under the name of Prince's bodyguard and close friend, Kirk Johnson, "for Prince's privacy.,"

Schulenberg's attorney, Amy Conners, disputed that. She said in a statement that Schulenberg "never directly prescribed opioids to Prince, nor did he ever prescribe opioids to any other person with the intent that they would be given to Prince."

F. Clayton Tyler, Johnson's attorney, released a statement saying that after reviewing the documents, "we believe that it is clear that Kirk Johnson did not secure nor supply the drugs which caused Prince's death."

Schulenberg is practicing family medicine in Minnesota and Conners said there are no restrictions on his license.

It is illegal for a doctor to write a prescription for someone under another person's name.

Joe Tamburino, a Minnesota defense attorney who is not associated with the Prince case, said while Schulenberg and Johnson could face charges if the allegations are true, it's unlikely state or federal prosecutors would pursue them. He called them low-level offenses that wouldn't draw prison time.

He said for prosecutors, the source of the fentanyl is the big target.

"The oxycodone in this case is only tangential to the whole case," Tamburino said, later adding. "The real meat and potatoes is going to be that fentanyl thing."

The documents said Prince did not have any prescriptions, including for fentanyl.

James L. Jones, a spokesman for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's field office in Chicago, said anyone convicted of writing a prescription for someone under another person's name could lose their DEA registration — meaning they could no longer prescribe medications — and could face discipline from their state medical board.

In practice, laws against prescribing drugs for someone under a false name are not usually enforced when a doctor intends to protect a celebrity's privacy, said Los Angeles attorney Ellyn Garofalo. She represented a doctor who was acquitted of all charges, including false name allegations, in the death of Anna Nicole Smith, the Playboy model and reality TV star who died of an accidental overdose in 2007.

"They would be indicting every pharmacist in Beverly Hills if this were strictly enforced," Garofalo said Monday.

Oxycodone, the generic name for the active ingredient in OxyContin, was not listed as a cause of Prince's death. But it is part of a family of painkillers driving the nation's overdose and addiction epidemic, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly 2 million Americans abused or were addicted to prescription opioids, including oxycodone, in 2014.

Patients who take prescription opioids eventually build up a tolerance and need to take stronger doses to get the same effect. In some patients, the cycle leads to addiction.

A search of Prince's home yielded numerous pills in various containers. Some were in prescription bottles for Johnson. Some pills in other bottles were marked "Watson 853," a label used for a drug that is a mix of acetaminophen and hydrocodone, another opioid painkiller. Last August, an official with knowledge of the investigation told The Associated Press that at least one of those pills tested positive for fentanyl, meaning the pill was counterfeit and obtained illegally. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because of the ongoing investigation.

In addition to the dozens of pills recovered, authorities also found a pamphlet for an addiction recovery center in California, the documents unsealed Monday show. The day before Prince died, Paisley Park staffers contacted the California addiction specialist as they were trying to get Prince help.

Prince did not have a cellphone and authorities searched multiple email accounts that they believed he was using, as they tried to determine how he got the drug that killed him, according to the search warrants. The search warrants don't reveal the outcome of the email searches.

The documents also say some of the drugs in Prince's bedroom were in a suitcase with the name "Peter Bravestrong" on it. Police believe Bravestrong was an alias that Prince used when he traveled.

Investigators have said little publicly about the case over the last year, other than it is active.

Documents highlight Prince's struggle with opioid addiction

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at Paisley Park on April 21. Nearly a year after his accidental overdose death at his suburban Minneapolis studio and estate, investigators still don't know how he got the fentanyl that killed him. The newly unsealed documents give the clearest picture yet of Prince's struggle with opioid painkillers.

___

WHAT DO AUTHORITIES SAY HAPPENED?

Investigators heard plenty from the people at Paisley Park when Prince's body was discovered. They told investigators that Prince was recently "going through withdrawals, which are believed to be the result of the abuse of prescription medication."

When authorities later checked a database set up to monitor who's getting prescriptions for controlled substances, they found nothing for Prince. But there was a prescription for the opioid painkiller oxycodone written for Kirk Johnson, Prince's bodyguard.

The prescription was dated April 14, 2016, the same day Prince was revived with an anti-overdose drug after falling ill on a plane. Dr. Michael Schulenberg, who wrote the prescription, told authorities he put the prescription in Johnson's name to protect Prince's privacy, according to a detective's affidavit. Schulenberg's attorney, Amy Conners, said in a statement that Schulenberg never prescribed opioids to Prince directly nor to another person with the intent of giving them to the singer.

Johnson's attorney, Clayton Tyler, said Johnson "did not secure nor supply the drugs which caused Prince's death." An autopsy showed Prince died of an overdose of fentanyl, another drug in the opioid family.

___

WHAT ARE POTENTIAL CHARGES?

Writing a prescription under another person's name violates state and federal law, said Ruth Martinez, executive director of the Minnesota Board of Medical Practice.

Martinez said she could not comment on whether the board is investigating Schulenberg's treatment of Prince. The agency's website on Monday listed no disciplinary or corrective actions taken against the doctor.

The board doesn't launch investigations unless someone makes a complaint. Complaints typically take 90 to 120 days to resolve, she said.

A person convicted under the law could be stripped of the ability to prescribe controlled substances by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and face other discipline from the state medical board.

___

WHY NO CHARGES YET?

A year might seem like a long time without charges, but criminal justice experts say the fact that no one's been charged doesn't mean no one ever will. They say it's a complex thing to track illegally obtained pills, and investigators and prosecutors want to build strong cases before interviewing witnesses who might provide useful information.

Although they can resort to subpoenas, the targets can exercise their right against self-incrimination — and the only way to get them to talk after that is by offering immunity. And, experts say, prosecutors and investigators don't want to lose a high-profile case such as Prince's — likely increasing their caution.

___

HOW OFTEN DO PRESCRIBERS USE FALSE NAMES?

Martinez of the Minnesota medical board said it's "quite infrequent" for a doctor to write out a prescription for someone in another person's name.

Two Los Angeles attorneys say it happens all the time in Hollywood. Celebrities frequently use aliases in hospitals and doctor's offices.

Laws against prescribing with a false name are not usually enforced when a doctor intends to protect a celebrity's privacy, said Los Angeles attorney Ellyn Garofalo.

She represented a doctor who was acquitted of all charges, including false name allegations, in the death of Anna Nicole Smith, the Playboy model and reality TV star who died of an accidental overdose in 2007.

"They would be indicting every pharmacist in Beverly Hills if this were strictly enforced," Garofalo said Monday.

Los Angeles criminal defense attorney Harland Braun said there are good reasons for doctors to want to protect privacy with the insatiable appetite for celebrity gossip.

"Say you have a major male actor who has a prescription for Viagra, do you want that out on TMZ?" Braun said.

___

Amy Forliti and Doug Glass contributed from Minneapolis.

Affidavit: Doc prescribed Prince opioids under friend's name

Court documents unsealed Monday in the investigation into Prince's death suggest a doctor and a close friend helped him improperly obtain prescription opioid painkillers, but they shed no new light on how the superstar got the fentanyl that killed him.

The affidavits and search warrants were unsealed in Carver County District Court as the yearlong investigation into Prince's death continues. The documents show authorities searched Paisley Park, cellphone records of Prince's associates, and Prince's email accounts to try to determine how he got the fentanyl, a synthetic opioid drug 50 times more powerful than heroin.

The documents don't reveal answers to that question, but do provide the most details yet seen on Prince's struggle with addiction to prescription opioids in the days before he died.

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park estate on April 21. Just six days earlier, he fell ill on a plane and had to be revived with two doses of a drug that reverses the effects of an opioid overdose.

Associates at Paisley Park also told investigators that Prince was recently "going through withdrawals, which are believed to be the result of the abuse of prescription medication."

The documents unsealed Monday allege Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg, a family physician who saw the musician twice last April, told authorities he prescribed the opioid painkiller oxycodone to Prince but put it under the name of Prince's bodyguard and close friend, Kirk Johnson, "for Prince's privacy," one affidavit said.

Schulenberg's attorney, Amy Conners, disputed that. She said in a statement that Schulenberg "never directly prescribed opioids to Prince, nor did he ever prescribe opioids to any other person with the intent that they would be given to Prince."

F. Clayton Tyler, Johnson's attorney, released a statement saying that after reviewing the documents, "we believe that it is clear that Kirk Johnson did not secure nor supply the drugs which caused Prince's death."

Schulenberg is practicing family medicine in Minnesota and Conners said there are no restrictions on his license.

It is illegal for a doctor to write a prescription for someone under another person's name.

Joe Tamburino, a Minnesota defense attorney who is not associated with the Prince case, said while Schulenberg and Johnson could face charges if the allegations are true, it's unlikely state or federal prosecutors would pursue them. He called them low-level offenses that wouldn't draw prison time.

He said for prosecutors, the source of the fentanyl is the big target.

"The oxycodone in this case is only tangential to the whole case," Tamburino said. "If this was a fentanyl script, oh boy, it would be a totally different situation. ... The real meat and potatoes is going to be that fentanyl thing."

The documents said Prince did not have any prescriptions, including for fentanyl.

James L. Jones, a spokesman for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration's field office in Chicago, said anyone convicted of writing a prescription for someone under another person's name could lose their DEA registration — meaning they could no longer prescribe medications — and could face discipline from their state medical board.

In practice, laws against prescribing drugs for someone under a false name are not usually enforced when a doctor intends to protect a celebrity's privacy, said Los Angeles attorney Ellyn Garofalo. She represented a doctor who was acquitted of all charges, including false name allegations, in the death of Anna Nicole Smith, the Playboy model and reality TV star who died of an accidental overdose in 2007.

"They would be indicting every pharmacist in Beverly Hills if this were strictly enforced," Garofalo said Monday.

Oxycodone, the generic name for the active ingredient in OxyContin, was not listed as a cause of Prince's death. But it is part of a family of painkillers driving the nation's overdose and addiction epidemic, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nearly 2 million Americans abused or were addicted to prescription opioids, including oxycodone, in 2014.

Patients who take prescription opioids eventually build up a tolerance and need to take stronger doses to get the same effect. In some patients, the cycle leads to dependence and addiction.

A search of Prince's home yielded numerous pills in various containers. Some were in prescription bottles for Johnson. Some pills in other bottles were marked "Watson 853," a label used for a drug that is a mix of acetaminophen and hydrocodone, another opioid painkiller. Last August, an official with knowledge of the investigation told The Associated Press that at least one of those pills tested positive for fentanyl, meaning the pill was counterfeit and obtained illegally. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because of the ongoing investigation.

In addition to the dozens of pills recovered, authorities also found a pamphlet for an addiction recovery center in California, the documents unsealed Monday show. The day before Prince died, Paisley Park staffers contacted the California addiction specialist as they were trying to get Prince help.

Dr. Howard Kornfeld sent his son, Andrew, to Minnesota that night, and the younger Kornfeld was among those who found Prince's body. Andrew Kornfeld was carrying buprenorphine, a medication that can be used to help treat opioid addiction. The Kornfelds' attorney, William Mauzy, has said Andrew had intended to give the medication to a doctor.

Prince did not have a cellphone and authorities searched multiple email accounts that they believed he was using, as they tried to determine how he got the drug that killed him, according to the search warrants. The search warrants don't reveal the outcome of the email searches.

The documents also say some of the drugs in Prince's bedroom were in a suitcase with the name "Peter Bravestrong" on it. Police believe Bravestrong was an alias that Prince used when he traveled.

Investigators have said little publicly about the case over the last year, other than it is active.

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Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/amyforliti . More of her work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/amy-forliti .

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AP Medical Writer Carla K. Johnson contributed to this story from Chicago. Doug Glass contributed from Minneapolis.

The Latest: Doctor disputes prescribing opioids for Prince

The Latest on the investigation into the death of Prince (all times local):

4:15 p.m.

A Minnesota doctor is disputing that he ever prescribed opioids to Prince or to anyone else with the intent they be given to Prince.

Search warrants unsealed Monday by investigators looking into Prince's overdose death nearly a year ago said that Dr. Michael Schulenberg prescribed opioids to Prince but put them in the name of Prince confidante Kirk Johnson.

Schulenberg's attorney, Amy Conners, says in a statement that Schulenberg didn't prescribe opioids either directly or indirectly to Prince.

An autopsy found Prince died of fentanyl.

An attorney for Johnson says Johnson "did not secure nor supply" the drugs that caused Prince's death.

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2:15 p.m.

A search warrant filed in the investigation of pop superstar Prince's death says the singer routinely got vitamin B12 injections so he could "feel better" before performances.

Several search warrants were unsealed Monday near the one-year anniversary of Prince's death of a fentanyl overdose. Authorities haven't yet charged anyone in the case.

The B12 detail was included in a detective's affidavit seeking one of the search warrants. The detective wrote that Prince didn't have a regular doctor, and instead saw various doctors arranged by his managers who would give him B12 injections before performances.

The injections are promoted online as a treatment for vitamin deficiencies that can lead to symptoms such as anemia.

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1:45 p.m.

A Minnesota defense attorney who's well-versed on drug cases says prosecutors are unlikely to pursue charges against a doctor who allegedly wrote a prescription for Prince in someone else's name.

Joe Tamburino is not associated with the Prince case. But he says allegations that a doctor wrote an illegal prescription for oxycodone is likely a low priority — because Prince died of fentanyl.

He says authorities could charge Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg and Prince's friend, Kirk Johnson, with a low-level felony that wouldn't result in prison time.

But, he says, that prescription is tangential to the case. Documents unsealed Monday don't say how Prince got the fentanyl that killed him, and Tamburino says finding the answer to that will be the target for investigators.

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9:05 a.m.

A court document says a doctor prescribed oxycodone for Prince under the name of the musician's friend to protect his privacy.

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park home on April 21.

Autopsy results showed he died from an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic drug 50 times more powerful than heroin.

According to search warrants unsealed Monday, authorities searched Paisley Park, cellphone records of Prince's associates, and Prince's emails to try to determine where he got the fentanyl that killed him.

The documents suggest Prince was struggling with prescription opioid addiction.

One affidavit says Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg admitted he prescribed oxycodone for Prince in a Prince's associate's name "for Prince's privacy."

A message left with Schulenberg's attorney wasn't immediately returned.

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12:15 a.m.

It's been nearly a year since Prince died from an accidental drug overdose at his suburban Minneapolis estate, yet investigators still haven't interviewed a key associate or asked a grand jury to consider whether criminal charges are warranted, according to an official with knowledge of the investigation.

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park home on April 21. Authorities later said he died of an overdose of fentanyl, a powerful synthetic drug. They still don't know the origin of those drugs and there has been no indication that they are poised to hold anyone responsible anytime soon.

On Monday, search warrants executed by local authorities are due to be unsealed, likely including one from the first search of Paisley Park.

'Showtime at the Apollo' to be weekly Fox series next season

The Fox network says it has picked up "Showtime at the Apollo" as a one-hour weekly series set to debut next season. The show will feature as its host Steve Harvey, who presided over two "Apollo" specials earlier this season.

Performers on those specials included John Legend, Ja Rule, Doug E. Fresh, Chaka Khan and Flo Rida.

Along with more guest stars, the upcoming series will feature elements from the Apollo's legendary Amateur Night, the live talent competition now in its 82nd year.

The Apollo Theater launched the careers of legendary artists including James Brown, Stevie Wonder, Lauryn Hill and The Jackson Five.

Janet Jackson's husband posts message to star on website

The pair recently became parents to a baby boy, Eissa Al Mana. A rep for Jackson did not confirm that they have split, but a message on his website next to a photo of Jackson professes his love for her, calling her the most beautiful person in the world.

The message ends: "We will be together in the Great Forever."

The singer showed off her a picture of her and her son for the first time Friday in a social media post .

The Latest: Painkiller prescribed for Prince in another name

The Latest on the investigation into the death of Prince (all times local):

9:05 a.m.

A court document says a doctor prescribed oxycodone for Prince under the name of the musician's friend to protect his privacy.

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park home on April 21.

Autopsy results showed he died from an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic drug 50 times more powerful than heroin.

According to search warrants unsealed Monday, authorities searched Paisley Park, cellphone records of Prince's associates, and Prince's emails to try to determine where he got the fentanyl that killed him.

The documents suggest Prince was struggling with prescription opioid addiction.

One affidavit says Dr. Michael Todd Schulenberg admitted he prescribed oxycodone for Prince in a Prince's associate's name "for Prince's privacy."

A message left with Schulenberg's attorney wasn't immediately returned.

___

12:15 a.m.

It's been nearly a year since Prince died from an accidental drug overdose at his suburban Minneapolis estate, yet investigators still haven't interviewed a key associate or asked a grand jury to consider whether criminal charges are warranted, according to an official with knowledge of the investigation.

Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at his Paisley Park home on April 21. Authorities later said he died of an overdose of fentanyl, a powerful synthetic drug. They still don't know the origin of those drugs and there has been no indication that they are poised to hold anyone responsible anytime soon.

On Monday, search warrants executed by local authorities are due to be unsealed, likely including one from the first search of Paisley Park.

Deals ensure cash keeps flowing to unsettled Prince estate

A year after Prince died of an accidental drug overdose, his Paisley Park studio complex and home is now a museum and concert venue. Fans can now stream most of his classic albums, and a remastered "Purple Rain" album is due out in June along with two albums of unreleased music and two concert films from his vault.

Prince left no known will and had no known children when he died last April 21, and the judge overseeing Prince's estate has yet to formally declare six of his siblings as its heirs. However, those running the estate have taken steps to preserve his musical legacy and keep the cash coming in. Here's a look at where things stand:

THE MUSIC

The value of the music deals hasn't been disclosed, and key financial information in voluminous court filings is sealed.

Universal Music Group was a big winner, reaching major deals that gave it the licensing rights to Prince's vault of unreleased music and his independently recorded albums, publishing rights and merchandising rights.

Under related deals, Prince's music is now available from major streaming services including Spotify, Apple Music, Pandora, Amazon Music and iHeartRadio.

But a lawsuit remains pending against Jay Z's Roc Nation and the Tidal streaming service over alleged copyright violations. Tidal claims Prince gave it the exclusive right to stream his albums, including his Warner Bros. catalog. Estate lawyers say he gave Tidal limited rights to only one album, 2015's "Hit N Run: Phase 1."

PAISLEY PARK

Paisley Park, which is run by the company that runs Elvis Presley's Graceland, opened for public tours in October. Visitors can see the studios and soundstage where Prince worked and pay their respects at the Paisley Park-shaped urn that holds his ashes. It also hosts dance parties and movie and video showings on Friday and Saturday nights.

Close to 100,000 people from around the world have taken the tour, even though winter was expected to be the slow season, said Joel Weinshanker, managing partner of PPark Management, who has a similar role with Graceland. He wouldn't release revenue figures.

Weinshanker said he expects several hundred thousand visitors in the first full year of operations, which he said would make it the No. 2 museum dedicated to an entertainer behind Graceland.

He said most of the money is going toward preserving the building, which he said was in "grave disrepair" when Prince died, and toward protecting its contents. He said the heating and cooling system had to be replaced, some rooms where videos were stored had recent water damage, and valuable custom-designed outfits were improperly stored on wire hangers.

From April 20-23, Paisley Park will mark the anniversary of Prince's death with Celebration 2017, which will include concerts and other programming. Acts scheduled to appear include The Revolution, Morris Day and the Time, New Power Generation, Liv Warfield and Shelby J., with members of 3RDEYEGIRL, the band Prince was nurturing when he died. Weinshanker said it will draw guests from 28 countries.

THE PROBATE CASE

Barring any surprises, six Prince siblings will get equal shares of his estate, which court filings have suggested is worth around $200 million. Federal and estate taxes are expected to consume nearly half of that.

Judge Kevin Eide wrote last month that he was "reasonably certain" he'll ultimately declare the heirs to be Prince's sister, Tyka Nelson, and his half-siblings Sharon Nelson, Norrine Nelson, John R. Nelson, Omarr Baker and Alfred Jackson.

After Prince died, more than 45 people filed claims purporting to be his wife, children, siblings or other relatives. They've all been rejected, but Eide has said he'll wait for some appeals to run their course before making a final ruling, which could take several months or more. The six presumptive heirs have asked him to speed things up. A hearing on that request is set for May 10.

THE DISPUTES

With so much money at stake, there's been some infighting. Court documents and testimony show that the siblings disagreed over who should control the estate, eventually settling on Comerica Bank & Trust as the executor.

The older half-siblings — Norrine, Sharon, John and Alfred — also wanted a co-executor, former Prince attorney L. Londell McMillan, who was a key figure in the deals for monetizing Prince's entertainment assets.

But Tyka and Omarr opposed McMillan, questioning his fitness to serve and accusing him of mismanaging a family tribute concert last October. They wanted CNN commentator Van Jones, who advised Prince on philanthropy. Citing the siblings' inability to agree, the judge put Comerica in sole control.

McMillan continues to advise Norrine, Sharon and John, though a recent filing indicates Jackson has broken with him. Lawyers for Omarr and Tyka have subpoenaed a potentially huge volume of documents from McMillan. The judge will consider a motion to quash that subpoena at the May 10 hearing.

Sharon, meanwhile, claimed last month that Comerica was being "dictatorial and bullish." Comerica denied any disrespectful, abusive or hostile conduct, but said the heirs don't get to vote on how it runs the estate.

Lady Gaga will make history as female headliner at Coachella

Lady Gaga will make history when she performs at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts festival this weekend, marking a decade since a solo woman has been billed as a headliner on the prestigious musical stage.

Beyonce had been slated to headline the festival in Indio, California, but backed out because she's pregnant with twins. Bjork was the last solo female to headline Coachella in 2007, so it begs the question: Why has it taken so long?

Women have always performed at Coachella, which began Friday, since it was launched in 1999. In the last few years the number of female performers has grown, including acts that blend alternative and pop, such as Sia and Tegan & Sara, to mega genre-mashers like M.I.A., Janelle Monae and Santigold.

Coachella is known as the festival for cool kids — and musicians. That leaves little to no room for acts that dominate Top 40 radio, where women have a strong presence, from Katy Perry to Rihanna.

Halsey, the Grammy-nominated singer who is readying her second alternative album and had one of last year's biggest pop hits with "Closer" alongside the Chainsmokers, performed at Coachella last year. The 22-year-old said women who perform alternative music are often billed as pop artists because of their sex.

"Festivals like Coachella, they pride themselves on being part of the counterculture, being tastemakers, upholding themselves to a certain standard of the artists that they include, and I think one of the problems is that female artists are so often tainted as pop artists even when they don't necessarily intend to be," Halsey said. "Female artists can put out the same style of a record as a male artist and when a male artist does it, it has a certain type of dignity, it has a certain type of edge ... as soon as a woman puts out a record of the same caliber, it's immediately filed as a pop record no matter what."

Halsey said it's something she's experienced in her own career with the success of "Closer."

"It was this giant pop record and immediately I was a pop artist even though I put out an alternative album, I played alternative festivals and I was on alternative radio," she said. "As soon as (you) do one pop record it's like the kiss of death for a female artist sometimes."

Gary Bongiovanni, CEO of concert trade publication Pollstar, said he didn't think the gap between male and female headliners at Coachella was calculated.

"I don't see that there's any sexism. There's nothing more than trying to put together a bill of artists that the public wants to see. And we live in a world where a significant majority of the acts are either male or male-fronted bands versus females or female-fronted bands," he said. "If you look at the level of business all of those artists do and you try to cobble together a lineup that's going to be appealing, it's difficult, and there are a lot of the female acts that may not lend themselves to performing in front of 60,000 or 80,000 people in an open field, versus headlining an area or more likely a theater."

In last year's Pollstar chart of the 100 top-grossing North America tours, women made up about 15 percent of the list, which was dominated by male acts and male-fronted bands. Only two women cracked the Top 10: Beyonce was No.1 and Adele came in fifth.

Coachella is sold out before the lineup is announced, so the festival has the luxury of picking performers instead of relying on acts to help sell tickets.

Along with Gaga, this year's headliners include Radiohead and Kendrick Lamar, who released his hotly anticipated new album Friday. Some of the female performers include Lorde, Banks, Tove Lo, Kehlani, Nao, Kiiara and Bishop Briggs. Yukimi Nagano, who fronts Swedish band Little Dragon, is returning to Coachella for a third time.

Nagano said she was surprised that it's been 10 years since a woman headlined the festival, adding: "I think it's a really positive thing."

Jason White, executive vice president of marketing at Beats by Dre, said the company is purposely, and exclusively, giving attention to women at the festival: Their space at Coachella will only feature female performers, including Erykah Badu, DJ Kiss, Ana Calderon, JCK DVY and Jasmine Solano.

"I think it really meshes incredibly well with what's going on with Coachella because you do have Gaga, we're excited about seeing Kehlani (and) there's some really solid performers this year," he said.

Halsey, who spoke over the phone Thursday as she drove to the desert to watch Coachella as a fan, said she was thrilled to see Gaga take the stage. She said the recent Super Bowl halftime performer is one of those pioneering female acts that haven't been boxed into a genre, though she knows "the extremes (Gaga) has to go to maintain that counterculture are much greater than that of what a male artist has to do."

"Drake is still considered a rap/rhythm artist even though he is essentially a pop artist when you look at the decisions that he makes and the climate that kind of surrounds his projects," Halsey said.

"And when you have a female artist in the same lane, they get written off as a pop artist simply because they're female, simply because the conversation with them, it goes to fashion, makeup or whatever, and those are questions and comments that don't surround the brand and surround the career of a male artist."

_____

Online:

https://www.coachella.com/

Comedian Charlie Murphy, brother of Eddie, dies at 57

Charlie Murphy, the older brother of Eddie Murphy and a comic performer in his own right who turned encounters with Rick James and Prince into standout sketches on "Chappelle's Show," has died. He was 57.

Murphy died Wednesday in New York of leukemia, according to his representative, Domenick Nati.

He was perhaps best-known for his appearances on Dave Chappelle's Comedy Central show. In the recurring segment "Charlie Murphy's True Hollywood Stories," Murphy would recount how his brother's fame brought him into the orbit of the biggest stars. His versions of the experiences, played out by him, Chappelle and others, became enduring hits.

In one sketch, James is shown as an impulsive big-mouth who keeps spouting, "I'm Rick James, (expletive)!" and trades punches with Murphy. In another, Prince is at first mocked for his frilly shirt but then shows his slick moves on the basketball court. The music legend then serves everyone pancakes.

"Who the (expletive) could make up" those events, Murphy asked at the end of the sketch.

He collaborated with writing his brother's starring films "Norbert" and "Vampire in Brooklyn." He voiced a role in the animated TV series that includes "The Boondocks" and also appeared in the comedy series "Black Jesus."

Fellow celebrities mourned his death.

Comedian Chris Rock tweeted, "We just lost one of the funniest most real brothers of all time." Former basketball great Magic Johnson tweeted that "I haven't seen anything as funny as Charlie Murphy & Dave Chappelle's skits on the Chappelle's Show!" and "Hamilton" playwright Lin-Manuel Miranda tweeted that Murphy's "storytelling was hilarious and unforgettable."

DL Hughley, who toured with Murphy and other comedians recently, tweeted: "After every gig, he rushed home to be with his kids. He died with gigs on the books."

Murphy's feature films include "Our Family Wedding," ''King's Ransom" and "CB4."

He is credited with appearances to air later this year on the Starz TV drama series "Power."

"He joined 'Power' for our upcoming season, and his talent shines in every scene," the channel said in a statement.

Faith Hill, Tim McGraw weigh in on famous musical couples

Faith Hill and Tim McGraw, who embarked on their third Soul2Soul tour last week, talk about what they admire about other musician couples both inside country music and outside the genre.

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BEYONCE and JAY Z

Although this royal couple has only toured once together, the On the Run Tour in 2014 was a cinematic event. Beyonce and Jay Z teased the tour with a Bonnie and Clyde-inspired trailer and highlights from the tour ended up on HBO as a special. "The truth is, I want to be Beyonce every single freaking night of my life," Hill said. "So I go out there thinking, 'I am Beyonce!'"

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GARTH BROOKS and TRISHA YEARWOOD

The couple has been singing together for longer than they have been married. Yearwood was a backup singer on Brooks' "No Fences" album and she was the opener on his first headlining tour. Married in 2005, they have been touring together on the Garth Brooks World Tour since 2014. McGraw broke out in the '90s thanks in part to Brooks bringing country music to a much wider audience. "We all came here at the same time, but Garth is Garth and nobody can be Garth," McGraw said. "He opened the door for a lot of us."

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FAITH EVANS and THE NOTORIOUS B.I.G

— Earlier this year CNN accidentally tweeted a headline with the wrong singer named Faith on a news item about Evans releasing a duet album with her late rapper husband, whose real name is Christopher Wallace. Fans on Twitter were quick to poke fun at the mistake, but Hill responded enthusiastically: "This sounds awesome!" Evans responded on Twitter with a suggestion: "Up for a bonus duet, Ms. Hill?"

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VINCE GILL and AMY GRANT

These two sweethearts put the love back in holiday season with their annual Christmas shows they've been doing for more than a dozen years that highlight Grant's contemporary Christian hits and Gill's premier guitar chops. "She is an incredible woman," Hill said of Grant, while Vince "is one of the most respected people in the business."

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