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Stars turn out for lavish French Riviera AIDS fundraiser

A star-studded French Riviera AIDS fundraising gala has raised more than $20 million (17.8 million euros) to combat the disease globally.

Guests at the 24th annual amfAR Cinema Against AIDS gala were treated Thursday to musical performances by Nicki Minaj, Rita Ora and Diana Ross, a fashion show and auction of items for the superrich.

The lavish evening, which raises money for AIDS research and education programs across the globe, attracts some of world's biggest celebrities, including Leonardo DiCaprio, Eva Longoria, Will Smith, Nicole Kidman and David Beckham. Many are in the area for the Cannes Film Festival, which runs through Sunday.

The champagne-fueled dinner event included a fashion show that earned more than three million euros ($3.36 million) by itself.

This year's gala theme celebrated the "Golden Age of Hollywood."

A chance to play soccer against Beckham sold for 350,000 euros ($392,000), the same price paid for a five-day trek to visit the Dalai Lama. A 1958 Jaguar XK150 sold for 600,000 euros (approximately $671,000).

British social media celebrity among dead from concert blast

It was not just family and friends mourning Martyn Hett this week. Even Mariah Carey was shocked by his death in the Ariana Grande concert bombing.

Carey posted a picture of Hett — one of 22 people killed in Monday night's bombing at the Manchester Arena — on Instagram wearing a T-shirt bearing her image.

"Devastated to learn that one of the victims in Manchester was part of the #Lambily," Carey wrote in the post, using the name she has given to her legion of fans. "RIP Martyn Hett. We will cherish your memory forever. His family and all the families affected are in my thoughts and prayers."

It was a tribute that surely would have touched the 29-year-old public relations worker who listed the singer's name as his religious view on Facebook and said on Twitter that, "My life peaked when I met Mariah Carey."

Hett's irreverent sense of humor was made for social media and he embraced many different platforms, with more than 12,000 Twitter followers and a half million views on a YouTube film he posted four years ago in which he spliced together scenes featuring one of the stars of iconic Manchester-based soap opera "Coronation Street."

The video showed fleeting scenes of Sue Nicholls, the actress who plays character Audrey Roberts, and a habit she has of saying "Hmm" at the end of sentences.

Britain's ITV network, which airs the long-running soap affectionately known as "Corrie," said on its website that it would dedicate a bench on the set to victims of the bombing.

"The dedication will be planned in the coming weeks following an outpouring of affection for 29-year-old 'Corrie' super-fan Martyn and all those who lost their lives and have been injured following the Manchester Arena bombing," ITV said.

Calling Hett a super-fan was no overstatement. He had a tattoo of one of the show's best-known characters, Deirdre Barlow, inked onto his left calf in the British television show "Tattoo Fixers." He also appeared on another show, "Come Dine With Me."

Hett's family could not be reached for comment Thursday, but in a statement released by Manchester police, they called him "the icon of all our lives."

"His infectious laugh and his niche sense of humor will stay with us forever," the family said.

Hett's sense of humor rang out from the final tweet on his Twitter feed, apparently made during Monday night's concert.

"When you sneak out for a toilet break on the Macy Gray song and the entire arena had the same idea #DangerousWomanTour," he tweeted.

The managing director of Rumpus PR, where Hett worked, paid tribute to him in a statement.

"Martyn loved life and I hope his lasting legacy is that people — in these dreadful times — choose to live their lives with joy not hate, just like he did," Paul Evans said.

'Hamilton' star to perform at Boston July 4th celebration

Tony Award-winning actor and musician Leslie Odom Jr., who starred in the Broadway phenomenon "Hamilton," will be among the guest artists at Boston's iconic July Fourth concert and fireworks celebration.

The Boston Pops announced Wednesday that Odom, singer-songwriter Andy Grammer and Grammy Award-winning musician Melissa Etheridge will headline the Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular this year under the direction of Pops conductor Keith Lockhart.

Organizers say a new work from composer Alan Menken, known for his scores in multiple Disney movies, and Tony Award-winning lyricist Jack Feldman will be premiered at the celebration.

The event typically draws about a half million people to the Charles River Esplanade. It will be broadcast on Bloomberg Television, which recently signed on as a media partner.

Ariana Grande fans tremble as they recall Manchester attack

Rihanna Hardy had been excited about seeing Ariana Grande ever since she got her concert ticket as a Christmas gift. So when the day came, the 11-year-old left school a couple of hours early to make sure to get to Manchester Arena on time.

Her parents, Ryan and Shauna, took the afternoon off work, and the family drove the 140 miles (225 kilometers) from Newcastle to Manchester. They struggled to find the arena's multistory parking lot, and barely managed to buy Rihanna a black Ariana Grande tour sweatshirt before the concert started.

But what was supposed to be a special night for Rihanna and thousands of other young concertgoers turned into a tragedy when a suicide bomb blasted off just outside the cavernous hall. It killed 22 people, including an 8-year-old girl, and injured 59 — the deadliest attack in Britain in more than a decade.

"Poor Rihanna ... just kept asking every five or 10 seconds, 'Are we going to die?' Those were her exact words," her father said.

The family took their seats, close to the stage, just before the first of two supporting acts warmed up the crowd. The arena, which seats 21,000, was packed. Many clutched pink balloons and donned cat ears, like those the 23-year-old Grande is famous for wearing.

As the former star of the Nickelodeon series "Victorious" sang and danced her way through her set, the arena heated up. Young children and their parents glistened with sweat.

Then, as the concert ended, the horror began.

Just a few minutes after Grande finished her final song, "Dangerous Woman," blew a kiss to the audience and left the stage, the house lights came back on. People began filing toward the exits.

It was then that a suspect identified as 22-year-old Salman Abedi set off his suicide bomb in the foyer, near a road linking the venue to the city's railway station. Witnesses described seeing bolts and other bits of metal at the scene of the blast.

The boom echoed through Manchester Arena, shaking the floor with a hollow thud. Thousands of Ariana Grande fans — many of them youngsters accompanied by their parents — fell silent for a few seconds, in shock. Then the screaming started.

"I thought we were going to die. It was just horrendous," said Rihanna's mother.

Panic descended on the hall.

"It was just sheer chaos," said Kirstyn Pollard, who had a seat close to the stage. "People were trying to get off the balconies. It was awful."

Melissa Andre and two friends clambered over a security barrier in their rush to get out. It was already dented from other concertgoers fleeing the arena, as officials tried frantically to restore order.

"A security official was on stage saying 'Be calm, everything's fine,'" said Andre, 20. "I think they were just saying that to calm people down before they got out. And then when we got out, the alarm went off."

Police were called in at 10:33 p.m. As they arrived, a smell hung in the air — a bit like smoke, a bit like burning, nothing the Hardys had ever smelled before.

"I can't describe it. It was a really awful smell," Shauna Hardy said. "And there was just alarms going off, police everywhere. Sirens everywhere. People running, screaming. It was just crazy. Absolutely crazy."

Ryan Hardy desperately tried to slow down his wife and daughter as they left the arena, worried they might fall in the crush of people fleeing the carnage. They emerged from the stifling heat of the concert hall into the cool night.

"Everyone else was running out the entrance while he was walking out the entrance," Rihanna — still wearing her Ariana Grande sweatshirt — said Tuesday, looking up proudly at her dad.

Police and paramedics rushed to aid the wounded, wrapping some in foil blankets to keep them warm and ward off shock. Others hobbled off into the night, their clothes torn and stained by blood.

Charlotte Fairclough, 14, was part of the rush to flee.

"Everyone was like scrambling over each other," she said. "Quite a few people got knocked over. It was like just a race to get out."

When Charlotte got out, she immediately called her mom, Stacy, who was waiting to pick up her daughter and a friend. The she called again to say she'd heard a big bang.

Her mother, at the time, wasn't too worried.

"I'd heard fireworks earlier in the night, so I wasn't too concerned to start with," she said.

The full scale of the attack did not hit home until they turned on the news at a hotel.

The Hardy family escaped unscathed, but the shock of the night endured even as they tried to sleep it off. When a door slammed loudly at half past five in the morning, Rihanna got frightened.

"There are a lot of people killed, a lot of people injured, a lot of people missing," Shauna Hardy said. "And we just feel so so lucky that we are all together."

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Associated Press writer Rob Harris in Manchester contributed.

Elvis and red velvet boost value of jet up for auction

A private jet once owned by Elvis Presley and featured on the National Geographic Channel is set to be auctioned after sitting on a runway in New Mexico for 30 years.

The red 1962 Lockheed Jetstar, one of many owned by the King of rock 'n' roll, has no engines and needs a restoration of its cockpit. But Elvis designed the interior that has red velvet seats and red shag carpet. The plane had been a source of mystery in Roswell, New Mexico where it has sat largely untouched and tucked away at a small airport's tarmac.

Liveauctioneers.com, which is handling the bidding, said the jet was owned by Elvis and his father, Vernon Presley. "This jet has the potential of being fully restored, and placed on exhibit for the world to come see," the auction website said.

Photos of the plane show exterior in need of restoration and seats of the cockpit torn.

Roswell International Air Center Interim Director Scott Stark said the plane is privately owned and rarely was open for tours. "It's been five or six years since there have been any tours of it," Stark said.

However, the owner has allowed the plane to be shown at various aviation events. Stark said the owner, whose name has not been released, recently decided to sell it.

GWS Auctions Inc. of California said on its website the plane will be auctioned May 27 at an event in California featuring celebrity memorabilia including handwritten notes from The Beach Boys and lost photos of the late R&B singer Aaliyah.

GWS Auctions Inc. did not immediately return a phone message and email from The Associated Press.

The auction house estimates the Elvis plane's value at $2 million to $3.5 million.

Elvis also owned more well-known planes. The Lisa Marie plane, for example, can be seen at Graceland in Memphis, Tennessee.

Presley was born in Tupelo on Jan. 8, 1935, and moved to Memphis with his parents at age 13. He became a leading figure in the fledgling rockabilly scene by covering songs originally performed by African-American artists like Big Mama Thornton (Hound Dog) and Arthur Crudup (That's All Right).

His provocative dancing and hit records turned him into one of the 20th century's most recognizable icons. Historians say his music also helped usher in the fall of racial segregation.

Elvis was 42 when he died on Aug. 16, 1977, in Memphis.

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Follow Russell Contreras on Twitter at http://twitter.com/russcontreras .

Not just 'Sgt. Pepper': Many 1967 musical firsts echo today

"Sgt. Pepper" was only the beginning. Half a century after the Beatles' psychedelic landmark, it stands as one of many musical astonishments of 1967 that shaped what we listen to now.

It was a year of technical, lyrical and rhythmic innovation, of the highest craftsmanship and most inspired anti-craftsmanship. The rock album became an art form, and the tight, two-minute hits of Motown and Stax began to give way to the funk of James Brown and Sly and the Family Stone and the fiery candor of Aretha Franklin and "Respect." It was the dawn of the rock festival, in Monterey, and of the pop soundtrack, Simon & Garfunkel's music for "The Graduate."

And it was the year Bob Dylan and the backing performers who would name themselves the Band quietly gathered in a pink house just outside of Woodstock, New York, and recorded dozens of songs old and new that were the birth of "roots music" and the foundation for rock's most famous bootleg, "The Basement Tapes."

"We were in our own little world, up in the mountains, kind of isolated from everything that was going on," says the Band's Robbie Robertson. "But looking back at that time, you could see that the stars were aligned and there was a magic people have been trying to dissect ever since."

There were endings in 1967 — the deaths of Otis Redding and Woody Guthrie — but many more beginnings. Few years contained so many notable debuts, from artists who would influence punk, heavy metal, glam rock, progressive rock, new wave and other musical trends: The Velvet Underground, the Jimi Hendrix Experience, the Doors, along with first albums by Leonard Cohen, Janis Joplin (with Big Brother and the Holding Company), the Grateful Dead, David Bowie, Pink Floyd and Sly and the Family Stone, who called their record "A Whole New Thing."

The month before Woody Guthrie died, his son, Arlo, debuted with the album "Alice's Restaurant." Side One was the anti-war classic "Alice's Restaurant Massacree," 18 minutes of deadpan absurdity about Thanksgiving and litter that would become a holiday tradition for the emerging "progressive" FM radio format.

In 1967, a 21-year-old Berkeley dropout, Jann Wenner, borrowed $7,500 and from a San Francisco loft turned out the first issue of Rolling Stone, which helped bring serious attention to music then-dismissed by most establishment newspapers and magazines. During a recent interview, Wenner said 1967 was an ideal time to launch such a publication. Rock was not only maturing, but becoming more interconnected. The Monterey festival in June helped introduce the Who and Hendrix to American audiences and musicians, while also bringing together performers from Los Angeles (the Byrds, the Mamas and the Papas) and San Francisco (the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane).

"There was a lot of energy and recognition of fellow artists coming from around the world and trying to do the same thing," Wenner says.

"All those new, highly visual acts at Monterey expanded greatly the idea of what you can do on stage," says the music critic Robert Hilburn. "After those events alone, anything seemed possible — this rock 'n' roll force was unleashed in all its creative power and glory."

Music scenes thrived throughout the United States and in England, where the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, the Who, Cream and others were making some of their best music; and a young Reg Dwight renamed himself Elton John and began his songwriting partnership with Bernie Taupin.

Besides "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band," the Beatles released the hits "Strawberry Fields" and "Penny Lane" and unveiled their paean to the Summer of Love, "All You Need is Love." The Stones issued the acclaimed "Between the Buttons" album and the classic two-sided single "Ruby Tuesday" and "Let's Spend the Night Together." The Who's "The Who Sell Out" cleverly interspersed mock-radio commercials and jingles between such hits as "I Can See for Miles." Cream's "Disraeli Gears," often listed among rock's greatest albums, includes the band's signature song, and one of rock's signature guitar riffs, "Sunshine of Your Love."

"The classic album era begins around this time and it canonizes music in a very different way than when you hear a single," says Ann Powers, a music critic for NPR and author of "Good Booty: Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music," which comes out in August. "And that's a powerful reason why the music remains so resonant, because the album is a like a novel set to music. It's the form we share with our children and the form we teach and the form we collect."

In the U.S., San Francisco's Haight-Asbury district was the home of Flower Power and Scott McKenzie's "San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)" the unofficial anthem. It was the year Joplin, the Dead and other San Francisco acts broke through nationally and Jefferson Airplane released its two most famous songs, "Somebody to Love" and "White Rabbit."

In Los Angeles, a label called Original Sound helped Dyke and the Blazers' "Funky Broadway" become a minor hit and likely the first one to include the word "funky." The Byrds warned aspiring musicians with the single "So You Want to Be a Rock 'n' Roll Star" while a folk trio called the Stone Poneys hit the top 20 with "Different Drum," which helped make a star of the 21-year-old lead singer, Linda Ronstadt. Buffalo Springfield, the short-lived quintet featuring Neil Young and Stephen Stills, released its protest classic "For What It's Worth" and the album "Buffalo Springfield Again," an innovative blend of pop, folk, rock and country that helped shape L.A. music for years.

In Muscle Shoals, Alabama, Wilson Pickett recorded his version of "Funky Broadway" and reached the top 10. In Memphis, Stax was at its peak, with a triumphant tour of Europe featuring Redding and Booker T. & the M.G.'s, Redding's dazzling performance at Monterey and classic singles by Sam and Dave ("Soul Man") and Arthur Conley ("Sweet Soul Music"). Stax never approached such success again; Redding was killed in a plane crash in December, days after adding overdubs to what became his greatest hit, "(Sittin' On the) Dock of the Bay."

One of Redding's greatest heirs would debut the same year. In Grand Rapids, Michigan, the founders of Hot Line Music Journal helped out a high school friend and released the album, "Back Up Train"; Al Greene soon dropped the final "e'' from his last name. In Philadelphia, producers Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff had their first 10 top hit, the Soul Survivors' "Expressway to Your Heart," and in the 1970s would supplant Motown as a commercial empire. At King Studios in Cincinnati, James Brown gathered his backing musicians and recorded "Cold Sweat," widely considered one of the first funk records and a track sampled by Public Enemy, DJ Shadow and other rap and hip-hop artists.

"We like to celebrate debut work, but the best work often happens when mature artists have to confront challenges from outside music. James Brown had been making music for quite a while by 1967. But being part of African-American culture, he's looking at the rise of Black Power and Afro-centrism and he knows he needs to try different things," Powers says.

"And this leads to a new phase and a new freedom. And you can still see that impact. Black Power became extremely influential with hip-hip artists. You look at Kendrick Lamar and you can imagine Kendrick Lamar as part of 1967. He has a different sound, but the sentiments and the political stance are not that far off."

In Detroit, Motown's golden age would soon end. The songwriting team of Holland-Dozier-Holland had left by 1968 because of a royalties dispute, and the rise of Sly and the Family Stone, in tune with the more militant politics of the late '60s, moved commercial tastes from the label's polished sound.

But in 1967, Berry Gordy's "Hitsville" studios were as productive as ever, from the Marvin Gaye-Tammi Terrell duet "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" to Stevie Wonder's "I Was Made to Love Her" and Smokey Robinson and the Miracles' "I Second That Emotion." A rival Detroit company, Revilot Records, helped launch one of the great funk performers of the 1970s and '80s, George Clinton, whose "(I Wanna) Testify" was a hit in 1967 for Clinton and his group, the Parliaments.

In New York, Bert Berns signed up 21-year-old Van Morrison for Bang Records and produced one of rock's catchiest and most enduring songs, "Brown Eyed Girl." Franklin, producer Jerry Wexler and some top session players completed Franklin's breakthrough album, one she had begun in Muscle Shoals, "I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You." Soon after, Franklin recorded one of Gerry Goffin's and Carole King's final collaborations and one of her most beloved hits, "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman."

High art, social consciousness and psychedelic jams were in fashion in '67, but there was space for carefree, radio-friendly singles, from the Turtles' "Happy Together" to Jackie Wilson's "Higher and Higher" and the Rascals' "Groovin'." The Box Tops' million-selling "The Letter" was a showcase for 16-year-old singer Alex Chilton, who became a formative influence on "alternative rock" in the following decades.

And the hottest act? A quartet that released four No. 1 albums and topped the charts for more than six months despite criticism that it wasn't a real group.

"It was a halcyon time for us," says Michael Nesmith, of the Monkees.

DJ Khaled calls former Sony executive L.A. Reid a 'legend'

L.A. Reid is no longer with Sony's Epic Records, but DJ Khaled believes the former chairman will bounce back in no time.

"L.A. Reid, he a legend. I'm sure he got some amazing things about to happen. You know nothing but love for L.A. Reid," said DJ Khaled at Sunday's Billboard Music Awards in Las Vegas.

Sony Music Entertainment released a seven-word statement last weekend announcing the exit: "L.A. Reid will be leaving the company." The label had no additional comment.

"Good friend of mine," added DJ Khaled. "He's amazing. He's the Berry Gordy of our time. L.A. Reid is amazing. That's my thoughts. He's an amazing person and he's a great executive, a great music mogul and he's a great friend."

Khaled, who was nominated for top rap album for "Major Key," said he will continue to "be great" in the wake of Reid's departure. Reid was instrumental in DJ Khaled breakout musical success.

"I mean, at the end of the day it's you know, L.A. expects me to be great, you know what I'm saying? And I'm going to continue being great and he going to be proud of me. And that is that."

Reid joined the company as CEO in 2011. Epic Records recently had the No. 1 song on the Billboard Hot 100 chart with "I'm the One," by DJ Khaled featuring Justin Bieber, Chance the Rapper and Quavo from Migos.

At Epic, Reid helped push acts like Grammy-winner Meghan Trainor, girl group Fifth Harmony and rapper-singer-producer Future to success.

Ty Dolla $ign, who was featured on the Fifth Harmony hit "Work From Home," had similar words of praise. "L.A. Reid is my big homie and I'm sure he'll be all right. At all times he is," he said.

Reid also guided Mariah Carey, Rihanna, Bieber and Kanye West to chart-topping success as president of Island Def Jam. Reid founded LaFace Records and helped launch hits with Toni Braxton, Outkast, TLC and Pink.

Beyonce, Jay Z celebrate twins at star-studded baby shower

Beyonce and Jay Z have celebrated the impending birth of their twins with a star-studded baby shower

A picture posted on the singer's Instagram account Sunday shows Beyonce in a bikini top and highlighting her pregnancy with an intricate design painted on her belly. A note on the photos show "The Carter Push Party" took place on Saturday. Jay Z's real name is Shawn Carter.

Beyonce's mother, Tina Lawson, shared photos and videos from the party on Instagram . Some of the guests at the gathering included Serena Williams, who's also pregnant, and La La Anthony. Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams from Beyonce's days with Destiny's Child were also in attendance.

Beyonce and Jay Z have a 5-year-old daughter, Blue Ivy.

The Black Eyed Peas to be Champions League final warm-up act

The Black Eyed Peas will perform on the field before Real Madrid plays Juventus in the Champions League final.

UEFA announced the warm-up act Monday for the match on June 3 at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, Wales.

It is the second year the game will kick off after a concert. A performance by Alicia Keys meant the Real Madrid-Atletico Madrid final last year started four minutes late at the San Siro in Milan.

The Champions League final typically draws an average global television audience of at least 160 million.

Hello! Drake breaks Adele's record at Billboard Music Awards

Adele set a record at the show in 2012 with 12 wins. The rapper, who walked into the show Sunday with 22 nominations, won top artist, top male artist and top Billboard 200 album ("Views"), among others, at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.

"I got my whole family up here," said Drake, who stood onstage with nearly two dozen people, including his father, Lil Wayne and Nicki Minaj.

Drake was presented the top artist award by Prince Jackson, the late Michael Jackson's eldest son. Drake beat out Beyonce, Justin Bieber, Rihanna, Adele, Ariana Grande, the Weeknd, twenty one pilots, Shawn Mendes and the Chainsmokers for the top prize. Of those nominees, only Drake and the Chainsmokers attended the Billboard Awards.

But other big names showed up.

Cher, who received the Icon award, sang her dance anthem "Believe" in a glittery number that included pasties and blonde hair with pink tips. She later changed to a huge, curly black 'do — and wore a black sheer bodysuit and leather jacket for "If I Could Turn Back Time." Her performance had the audience on its feet, singing and dancing.

"I wanted to do what I do since I was 4 years old and I've been doing it for 53 years," said Cher, who turned 71 on Saturday. "And I can do a five-minute plank. Just saying."

"I think luck has so much to do with my success with a little bit of something thrown in," she added.

Korean boy band BTS, who won top social artist, earned one of the night's loudest ovations. Another highlight was Celine Dion.

In a beautiful, Met Gala-ready white gown, she belted out "My Heart Will Go On," the Oscar-winning song from "Titanic." The film is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. John Legend and Florida Georgia Line also had a shining moment when they sang a duet version of the country duo's soft hit, "H.O.L.Y."

Dan Reynolds of the rock band Imagine Dragons led a moment of silence for Chris Cornell, who died Thursday. He called the Soundgarden and Audioslave singer "a true innovator," ''a musical architect," ''a prolific songwriting" and "a legendary performer" — as a large photo of Cornell singing with his eyes closed was displayed behind him.

"We send our respects as well as our love to Chris' family at this time," Reynolds said.

Miley Cyrus sang her breezy new single, "Malibu," delivering a sound and muted style that marked a departure from the hits that made her a pop star years ago. She was teary eyed at the end of the performance.

"And for the first time in years with pants on," Noah Cyrus, standing next to father Billy Ray Cyrus, introduced her older sister, who was wearing white shorts and a cowboy hat.

Minaj kicked off the show with an explosive nine-minute performance of her hit songs alongside her mentor Lil Wayne and frequent collaborator David Guetta. She recently broke Aretha Franklin's record for most songs placed on the Billboard Hot 100 chart by a female artist.

Co-host Vanessa Hudgens impersonated Minaj's rap style at the top of the show, and it was the first of the many good moments for the actress and singer Sunday night. Hudgens, who hosted with Ludacris, also sang Dion's "I'm Your Lady" and wowed with her fashion choices. Even Drake noticed her, saying she looked "incredible."

Beyonce and twenty one pilots each won five awards, while the Chainsmokers — who tied Drake with 22 nominations — won four awards, including top Hot 100 song for "Closer" with Halsey.

"This feels good but it feels so wrong because I love Drake so much," said Halsey (Drake's "One Dance" was also nominated for top Hot 100 song).

The Chainsmokers performed "Young" with Andrew Taggart on vocals and Alex Pall behind the board (they were also backed by a drummer), and Drake performed from the Fountains of Bellagio. Ed Sheeran sang "Castle on the Hill" from Santiago, Chile, while Bruno Mars performed his silky new single, "Versace on the Floor," from Amsterdam.

Other performers include Lorde, Sam Hunt, Halsey, Camila Cabello and Julia Michaels.

At the show, Diddy honored his former friend and artist Notorious B.I.G, who would have turned 45 on Sunday. Diddy also introduced CJ Wallace, B.I.G's son, who spoke about his father's legacy. Then Diddy showed the trailer of the documentary, "Can't Stop, Won't Stop: A Bad Boy Story," which will be available on Apple Music on June 25.

Former One Direction singer Zayn was named best new artist, while Justin Timberlake's Oscar-nominated "Can't Stop the Feeling!" won top radio song and top selling song.

Blake Shelton won top country artist and showed love for his beau and fellow singer Gwen Stefani.

"I felt like the luckiest guy in the room 'cause Gwen was here with me anyway," he said.

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Online:

https://www.billboardmusicawards.com/

Judge confirms Prince's 6 siblings as heirs to his estate

A judge confirmed Prince's six siblings to be his rightful heirs in a ruling released Friday, bringing them a big step closer to collecting their shares of the music legend's multimillion-dollar estate.

Carver County District Judge Kevin Eide formally declared that Prince died without a will and that his heirs are his sister, Tyka Nelson, and five half-siblings — Sharon Nelson, Norrine Nelson, John R. Nelson, Omarr Baker and Alfred Jackson.

The siblings will still have to wait to inherit their shares of Prince's estate, which court filings suggest has an estimated value of about $200 million, though taxes are expected to consume about half of that.

More than 45 people came forward in the wake of Prince's death, claiming to be his wife, children, siblings or other relatives. Some, including a Colorado prison inmate who said he was Prince's son, were ruled out through DNA testing. Others, such as a woman and girl who claimed to be Prince's niece and grandniece, had their claims rejected as a matter of law.

Some of those people filed appeals, and Eide said that if appellate courts send any of the rejected claimants back to him, he will consider them. And until the appeals are resolved, Eide said the siblings won't be able to collect anything without his approval.

And under state law, others who feel they have credible claims of heirship have a year from the judge's order to come forward with their claims.

Eide previously signaled that the six siblings would likely be named Prince's heirs, but he also had said he wouldn't make the declaration until appeals had been decided. Lawyers for the siblings didn't want to wait, though, saying further delays would increase costs to the estate and impede its efficient administration. The siblings' attorneys didn't immediately reply to phone calls seeking comment Friday.

Attorneys for rejected claimants had urged Eide to wait for appeals to be resolved before naming the heirs. Andrew Stoltmann, a lawyer for the woman and girl who say they are Prince's niece and grand-niece, said Friday that he hadn't seen the new ruling but would examine it and determine whether to appeal it.

Prince died April 21, 2016, of an accidental overdose of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid drug 50 times more powerful than heroin.

Since his death, Prince's Paisley Park studio complex and home has been turned into a museum and concert venue. His estate has also struck deals to make his albums available by streaming, and next month plans to release a remastered "Purple Rain" album as well as two albums of unreleased music and two concert films. The values of those deals and revenue generated from Paisley Park tours have not been disclosed.

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Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: https://twitter.com/amyforliti

Forbes: Jay Z and Beyonce worth a combined $1.16 billion

Jay Z and Beyonce are a billion-dollar couple according to one estimate.

Forbes puts the combined wealth of the married superstars at $1.16 billion. The magazine estimates Jay Z's fortune at $810 million. It says Beyonce has amassed $350 million.

Forbes says most of Jay Z's money is involved in Roc Nation and his other companies. Both the rapper and the singer also have a significant stake in the Tidal streaming music service.

Jay Z signed a 10-year pact with Live Nation to partner on concert events worth $200 million.

The couple has a 5-year-old daughter, Blue Ivy. Beyonce is pregnant with twins.

After 6 years, L.A. Reid out as chairman of Epic Records

Sony Music Entertainment released a seven-word statement Saturday announcing the exit: "L.A. Reid will be leaving the company."

The label had no additional comment.

Reid joined the company as CEO in 2011. Epic Records currently has the No. 1 song on the Billboard Hot 100 chart with "I'm the One," by DJ Khaled featuring Justin Bieber, Chance the Rapper and Quavo from Migos.

At Epic, Reid helped push acts like Grammy-winner Meghan Trainor, girl group Fifth Harmony and rapper-singer-producer Future to success.

Reid also guided Mariah Carey, Rihanna, Bieber and Kanye West to chart-topping success as president of Island Def Jam. Reid founded LaFace Records and helped launch hits with Toni Braxton, Outkast, TLC and Pink.

APNewsBreak: Beyonce, Bruno Mars lead BET Awards nominations

Beyonce dominated last year's BET Awards with "Lemonade," but there's more juice in her cup.

The pop star is nominated for seven awards at the 2017 BET Awards, the network told The Associated Press on Monday. The show will take place June 25 at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles.

Bruno Mars follows Beyonce with five nominations.

Beyonce, who won video of the year with "Formation" last year, is nominated for the top prize again with "Sorry." Her competition includes her sister Solange ("Cranes In the Sky"); Mars' playful "24K Magic"; Migos' No. 1 hit "Bad and Boujee"; and Big Sean's anthemic "Bounce Back."

Beyonce and Solange — who has four nominations — will go head-to-head for best female R&B/pop artist, along with Rihanna, Mary J. Blige and Kehlani. Beyonce's other nominations include album of the year for "Lemonade," the viewer's choice award and video director of the year. She's nominated twice for best collaboration with the songs "Freedom" (with Kendrick Lamar) and "Shining" (shared with Jay Z and DJ Khaled).

The winners in the 19 categories, including film and sports awards, will be selected by BET's Voting Academy, comprised of entertainment professionals and fans.

Mars, whose latest album was inspired by '90s R&B, is also nominated for best male R&B/pop artist, album of the year, the viewer's choice award and video director of the year.

Chance the Rapper, who scored four nominations and won three Grammys this year, will battle Lamar, Drake, J. Cole, Future and Big Sean for best male hip-hop artist. Nicki Minaj will compete with rival Remy Ma for best female hip-hop artist, an award Minaj has won since 2010.

Hip-hop trio Migos also scored four nominations.

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Online:

http://www.bet.com/shows/bet-awards/bet-awards-2017-splashpage.html

Brandy, Tyrese perform at Mother's Day music festival

Platinum-selling R&B singers Tyrese, Brandy, Anthony Hamilton and Kem celebrated Mother's Day two days early at a concert in front of feverish fans in Brooklyn.

The second annual SJ Presents Mother's Day Good Music Festival took place at the Barclays Center, which also included rising singer-songwriter Major.

Brandy was energetic as she worked the stage left to right, singing memorable hit songs such as "I Wanna Be Down," ''Full Moon" and "Sittin' Up In My Room." Tyrese, also a star of the "Fast & Furious" box office franchise, closed the four-hour show.

Hamilton's performance went from upbeat to soulful as fans sang along with the Grammy-winning singer. He was supported by The Hamiltones, his lively backing band who earned loud cheers from the crowd when hitting impressive high notes.

Kem, whose sound blends R&B, neo-soul and jazz, was a powerhouse with a large backing band dressed nattily in tuxedos.

"God bless the mothers — we love you," he yelled.

The Detroit-raised singer, who was once homeless and a drug addict, said his mother gave birth to him when she was 17 and that his grandfather was preacher, so the time was a rough one for his mother. He thanked God for supporting her and him onstage and said he wanted to give back as a result.

Then Kem told the audience he would give $5,000 to the YMCA in Brooklyn and $5,000 to the organization WIN (Women In Need), which supports homeless women and their children.

Last year's Mother's Day Good Music Festival, also held at the Barclays Center, featured R&B singers Monica, Ginuwine, Tank, Keyshia Cole and Avant.

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Online:

http://sjpresentsinc.com/

Dior takes celeb crowd caving with LA cruise collection show

Dior took its star-studded crowd on an ultra-chic cave expedition Thursday night with an eclectic cruise collection inspired by the Lascaux caves in southwestern France.

Rihanna, Charlize Theron, Demi Moore, Brie Larson, Kelly Rowland and Nick Jonas were among the A-list audience packed into glammed-up, safari-style tents atop a hilly nature reserve northwest of Los Angeles.

"We would like to share with this collection another side of this beautiful city," explained creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri in an interview before the dusty, outdoor runway show featuring live rhythmic music. "There is not only red carpet!"

Moore, dressed in a velvet blazer and high-collar lace top, called the setting "magnificent."

"It's incredible, getting a whole experience, not just a fashion show," she said.

Chiuri said Christian Dior visited California in 1947 and proclaimed it "a paradise." She aimed to pay homage to the iconic designer's love of the city while embracing Los Angeles' natural beauty and laid-back style.

"I really believe that now it's possible to mix a different element, to find the balance that speaks to the heritage, but in some way moves the brand to the future for women," the Italian designer explained.

Animal drawings inspired by the wall paintings in Lascaux made their way onto cozy swearers, flowing skirts and loose trousers.

Long fringe dangled from necklines, adorned dresses, skirt hems and ponchos.

"They were very kind of Western frontier women," said Anjelica Huston of the models. "Had a little bit Peruvian, a little bit Lascaux. Very, very pretty. Very beautiful."

Colorful patterned dresses in shades of rust, terra cotta, mustard and brown were topped with tailored blazers, biker jackets and belted overcoats.

Each outfit was completed with a Western-style hat adorned with turquoise beads or animal sketches.

Leather sandals, pointy flats and lace-up boots walked the dirt-path runway — practical footwear for Dior's stylish adventurer.

Theron, who has modeled for the French luxury band, called the show "magical" and "inspirational."

"It's always a pleasure and a luxury to wear Dior," said Rihanna, who was wearing ripped jeans and an off-the-shoulder fur wrap. "For one, it's expensive. For two, it's really well-made and it's always something that helps you express your femininity at the highest level."

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Online:

http://www.dior.com

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Club owner who turned Sunset Strip into rock heaven dies

Mario Maglieri, the Hollywood entrepreneur who doubled as a godfather figure to generations of rock stars from the Doors' Jim Morrison to Guns 'N Roses' Axl Rose, has died at age 93.

Maglieri died Thursday morning "surrounded by loved ones," his family said in a statement. No cause of death was given.

For decades he operated two of Hollywood's most venerable and legendary Sunset Strip nightclubs — the Whiskey A Go Go and the Rainbow Bar & Grill.

"Rest In Peace Mario Maglieri King of The Sunset Strip," the marquee over the Whiskey proclaimed Friday.

It was at the Whiskey that the Doors found a following as the house band in the 1960s. Over the years Led Zeppelin, the Police, Van Halen and literally hundreds of other acts spanning generations have played there.

The Beatles dropped by for a visit during their first U.S. tour in 1964. George Harrison, annoyed by a paparazzi, threw a drink at him, hitting actress Mamie Van Doren instead.

At the Rainbow, Maglieri would keep many of his musicians in booze and food, occasionally having to throw one or more of them out when they caused too much trouble.

"The rowdiest? Oh, Guns N' Roses! I had to put them out I don't know how many times," he told the Los Angeles Times in 1993. "They're good guys, but they get out of hand."

Born Feb. 7, 1924, in Seppino, Italy, Mario Mikeal Maglieri moved to the United States with his family at age 4.

He ran restaurants and clubs in Chicago for a few years before moving to Los Angeles in the 1960s to manage the Whiskey, eventually taking it over. A few years later, he and partners took over a nearby Sunset Strip restaurant and renamed it the Rainbow.

It was a heady time on the Strip in those early years, one punctuated by up-and-coming young musicians and their groupies, many living in nearby Laurel Canyon. There was an abundance of drugs and alcohol as well, although Maglieri said he never partook of the former.

"I'm 70 years old, and I've never smoked a joint in my life," he told the Times in 1993. "People ask me and I tell them, 'Dope is for dopes.' People want to fight me on that, I'll fight them. I've seen too many lives destroyed by drugs."

He said he bought Janis Joplin a bottle of her favorite whiskey, Southern Comfort, three days before she died of a drug overdose in 1970. He also spent a good deal of time trying to talk Morrison into cutting back on his substance abuse before he died in 1971.

"He was a good boy. It's too bad I couldn't straighten him out, because I tried awful hard," he said.

But he also recalled numerous good times, among them talking politics with John Lennon in the parking lot and watching members of Led Zeppelin have fun.

"Every time they were in town, they'd party in the middle booth," he said. "And them guys know how to party."

He is survived by his wife, Scarlett; a son, Mikeal; and three grandchildren.

A public memorial is scheduled May 28 at the Rainbow.

2nd weekend of Jazz Fest kicks off with 'locals day'

Fans braved an inordinate amount of rain on Thursday to kick off the second weekend of the seven-day New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.

The rain muddied and puddled the infield of the Fair Grounds Race Course but failed to keep music lovers away from the festival, which showcased performances by Widespread Panic, Darius Rucker and Corinne Bailey Rae.

A packed crowd stood under gray skies before the festival's largest stage to cheer Widespread Panic, the jam band from Athens, Georgia, who went through a litany of their songs, including "Travelin' Light," and "Heroes."

Rucker, who gained fame with Hootie & the Blowfish before pursuing a solo career as a country music performer, closed out the festival's second-largest stage, dancing and singing his way through his 90-minute set.

Thursday is often less crowded than the weekends and is a popular day for New Orleans-area residents to attend the festival. NOLA.com/The Times-Picayune reports (http://bit.ly/2pewurJ ) there also are usually lots of younger faces in the crowd thanks to School Day at the Fest, a program dedicated to bringing New Orleans students to the city's largest classroom to get an education in what makes their city's culture unique.

Sunny skies are expected for the last three days of the festival, which ends Sunday. Friday's headliners include Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds, Wilco, Earth, Wind & Fire and Boney James.

Halle Berry to appear on VH1 show celebrating moms

Halle Berry has signed on for VH1's show honoring moms ahead of Mother's Day.

The cable channel says the Oscar-winning actress will honor a mother from the non-profit domestic violence organization, the Jenesse Center, at "Dear Mama: An Event To Honor Moms." VH1 says the second annual edition of the show will include stars paying tribute to their mothers.

Other scheduled guests include Mary J. Blige, Ludacris, Kelly Rowland, Robin Thicke, Maxwell and DJ Khaled.

"Blackish" star Anthony Anderson will host alongside actress and former MTV VJ La La Anthony.

The show premieres May 8 at 10 p.m. on VH1.

Janet Jackson separates from husband, plans to resume tour

Jackson says in a video posted on Twitter that she has separated from husband Wissam Al Mana. She says, "We are in court and the rest is in God's hands."

The couple's son was born in January.

The 50-year-old singer has also announced a return to the road on Sept. 7, 18 months after postponing her "Unbreakable" tour. She didn't say where the performance will take place.

Jackson is also changing the name of the tour to "State of the World."

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