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Youngblood

Host of Spotlight Gold - Saturdays from 7:00am - Noon

Latest from Youngblood

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Watch: Aretha Franklin 'The House That Jack Built'

Today we Spotlight another classic by Aretha Franklin. 'The House That Jack Built' was released in 1968. The song reached #2 on the U.S. R&B charts in 1968. Listen to KISS 104.1 for more.

Watch the video below:

Spotlight Gold - Saturdays from 7:00am - Noon.

Watch: The Temptations - I Wish It Would Rain

Spotlight Gold with Youngblood is back and this week we're first Spotlighting a soulful classic from The Temptations.

Watch 'I Wish It Would Rain' below:

Spotlight Gold - Saturdays from 7:00am - Noon.

World’s Energy Leaders Impressed and Inspired by Kemper Facility

The Kemper County energy facility has become an epicenter of attention for a world community seeking to learn more about this innovative carbon capture technology. Southern Company is proudly inventing America’s – and the world’s – energy future through the development of the world’s most advanced coal plant – the Kemper County energy facility. The result of decades of robust, proprietary research and development, the Kemper project has garnered enormous support from energy leaders across the U.S. and around the world. And Mississippi Power is completing the project with an unwavering focus on safety and quality. When the Kemper County energy facility is fully operational using Mississippi lignite as its primary fuel, it will be the world’s first lignite-fueled plant to combine Southern Company’s patented TRIG™ coal gasification system with carbon capture systems. For years now a steady flow of energy leaders, national policy makers, scientists and engineers have journeyed to Kemper County, Mississippi to witness firsthand what some are saying is energy‘s future. U.S. Secretary of Energy Dr. Ernest Moniz visited the facility as part of a contingent of Department of Energy officials. “You’re really seeing the future rise up in this activity behind us,” Moniz said. Moniz also called Kemper the “plant of the future” and said it would need to be replicated worldwide to ensure clean, safe, reliable and affordable energy for everyone. Tord Lien, Norway’s minister of Petroleum and Energy said he wanted to see the Kemper project in person. Norway is a pioneer in carbon capture technology. “I’m truly impressed with what I’ve seen. Viewing this plant has given me a new perspective on how to proceed with carbon capture,” he said, adding that he thought all the international dignitaries in attendance would return to their home countries “with new dedication and inspiration.” Carbon capture experts from England, France and Norway have also visited the facility as part of an ongoing effort by Southern Company, the U.S. Department of Energy and carbon capture-related facilities worldwide to promote better communication, cooperation and technical exchange among the world’s emerging carbon capture and sequestration initiatives. “I have to say we’re really impressed with what we’ve seen here and what’s been accomplished here at the Kemper County project,” said Aslak Einbu of Norway. “The U.S. is really in the lead today in terms of implementing this new technology. Although Europe and the U.S. have different approaches on how to cope with climate change, it’s interesting to see these plants starting to show up, and although we don’t have any plants in Europe like this so far, this project shows that it’s actually possible to do it.” Kemper has seen a huge interest from Pacific Rim countries where coal demand is very high. “Our impression of this facility (Kemper) is very great,” said Kyoichi Nakanishi, assistant manager Overseas Business Group, Chugoku Electric said.  “This is state of the art technology that is contributing to the local economy but also can impact the world as a whole.” Jukka Uosukainen, a top climate technology official for the United Nations, who is passionate about technology and protecting the environment for future generations said a day at the Kemper County energy facility left him convinced the technology in Mississippi will change the world.   “I'm ready to speak loudly for this,” he said. “Meeting you today assures me we can bring the people and the technology to the places that need it.” Mihaela Cartsei, the acting director of the Energy and Environment Program at the Atlantic Council, is from Romania. Officials in her country are looking closely at the technology as a solution for cleaner energy. Her first visit to the Kemper facility impressed her on many levels, from the engineering and construction expertise to the potential of the technology for use by future generations. “We hope to see this technology advance,” Cartsei said. “This is a solution that can be applied in other countries as well. What I would love to do  going forward is spread this information further and wider to see if we can take some of the lessons learned here and the technology here and develop a new project somewhere else in the world.” A collaboration centered on a cleaner future for coal brought representatives from the Canadian Consulate, the Saskatchewan Provincial Government and representatives of SASKPower to the Kemper County energy facility. Even though SASK’s Boundary Dam power plant doesn’t gasify coal or capture carbon dioxide before combustion as the Kemper plant will do, Boundary Dam represents the world’s first foray into carbon capture for a conventional coal-fired facility.   In addition to touring the Kemper plant, the delegation visited other facilities involved in enhanced oil recovery where captured carbon dioxide from the Kemper County energy facility will be used for even more energy production. “I’ve represented Saskatchewan on the energy council for several years, and I’ve always heard about Kemper,” Fred Bradshaw, a member of Saskatchewan’s Legislative Assembly said.  “We’ve got a large supply of coal in the world, and we’re going to have to have power.  If we’re going to move the world forward we have to have coal in the mix, and it’ll have to be in the mix for a number of years. Given the way our respective federal governments are putting more regulations on carbon emissions, projects like these have to be initiated.” The Kemper project will capture carbon dioxide pre-combustion – during the process of turning lignite coal into synthesis gas. That gas will then be used to generate power. Captured carbon dioxide is expected to boost oil production through enhanced oil recovery. And contracts are in place to sell captured carbon dioxide to oil companies. To learn more, visit the Kemper County energy facility website.

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