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New: Up to 1 inch of snow possible in metro Atlanta on Friday 

Updated chance of snow forecast

ATLANTA FORECAST

Today: Mostly cloudy. High: 49

Tonight: Rain possible. Low: 43

Tomorrow: Mostly cloudy. High: 48

» For a detailed forecast, visit The Atlanta Journal-Constitution weather page.

While the mixture of sleet and rain moved out of the Atlanta area, sleet could return Thursday and up to 1 inch of snow is possible Friday, Channel 2 Action News meteorologists said.

“It looks like Friday, there is a chance for the metro area to see rain mixed with snow actually change over to snow,” Channel 2 Chief meteorologist Glenn Burns said, adding that between half an inch and 1 inch of snow could accumulate. 

But Burns stressed that the forecast could change and shift north or south, meaning Atlanta wouldn’t see snow.

So don’t panic and wipe clean the bread and milk aisles of your neighborhood grocery stores.

“There is still a lot of uncertainty,” Channel 2 meteorologist Brad Nitz said.

Temps are expected to be in the mid-30s in Atlanta by 6 a.m. Friday.

“If anything falls and makes it to the ground, it wouldn’t stick around for long,” Nitz said. “It’ll be melting snow. But up above the ground, higher up in the atmosphere where it’s below freezing, falling as snow and then melting as it approaches the ground, so you get that rain/snow mix.”

Currently, It’s 41 degrees in Atlanta.

The expected high Thursday is 48 degrees, the news station reported. The average high for this time of year is 56.

What You Need to Know: Winter Solstice

What You Need to Know: Winter Solstice

Supermoon 2017: 12 must-see photos that lit up social media

Did you miss the supermoon that delighted skygazers Sunday night? Here’s the good news: Photographers around the world shared must-see snapshots of the phenomenon on social media.

>> Click here or scroll down to see the photos

>> MORE PHOTOS: Supermoon 2017 around the world

>> Sunday supermoon kicks off trilogy of spectacular lunar viewing

>> Supermoon 2017: How to see, photograph the majestic ‘Full Cold Moon’ this weekend

>> Read more trending news

You’ll also get a chance to see other supermoons on Jan. 1 and Jan. 31, 2018.

Photos: Supermoon delights skygazers around the world

A trilogy of supermoons began Dec. 3, 2017, with a full cold moon that could be viewed in person or online. The other supermoons will occur Jan. 1 and Jan. 31, 2018.

Photos: Bali volcano Mount Agung prompts mass evacuation

Indonesian authorities ordered a mass evacuation of people Monday from an expanded danger zone around an erupting volcano on Bali.

NASA to launch JPSS-1 weather satellite Saturday morning

NASA, in partnership with the NOAA, will launch a satellite Saturday that will help improve weather forecasts.

>> Read more trending news

The satellite launch was scheduled for earlier this week, but was postponed twice, once because of high winds and once because of technical difficulties.

The launch for the JPSS-1 satellite is scheduled at 4:47 a.m. Saturday, according to NASA.

>> Related: NASA postpones JPSS-1 weather satellite launch

A live stream of the launch will be available on NASA’s website starting at 4:15 a.m.

The satellites will help improve NOAA forecasts for the three to seven day time frame. The data collected from the JPSS is fed into the numerical forecast models to help improve them. The satellites will also collect atmospheric measurements, ground conditions and ocean conditions like vegetation, hurricane intensity and atmospheric moisture. 

The JPSS-1 will be launch from Vandenburg Air Force Base in California pending proper flight conditions. The launch was originally scheduled for Tuesday.

>> Related: NASA scrubs launch of JPSS-1 weather satellite again

This satellite is a polar orbiting satellite, which means it will orbit the earth from the one pole to the other passing the equator 14 times a day. Full coverage of the planet will then be provided twice a day.

JPSS-2 is planned to launch in 2021, and JPSS-3 and JPSS-4 are anticipated to launch in 2026 and 2031.

NASA scrubs launch of JPSS-1 weather satellite again

4:37 a.m. EST Wednesday: The satellite launch scheduled for this morning was canceled due to upper level winds, according to NASA.

ORIGINAL STORY: NASA, in partnership with the NOAA, will launch a satellite today that will help improve weather forecasts.

>> PREVIOUS STORY: NASA postpones JPSS-1 weather satellite launch

The launch for the JPSS-1 satellite is scheduled for 4:47 a.m. EST, according to NASA.

A live stream of the launch will be available on NASA’s website.

The satellites will help improve NOAA forecasts for the three- to seven-day time frame. The data collected from the JPSS is fed into the numerical forecast models to help improve them. The satellites will also collect atmospheric measurements, ground conditions and ocean conditions like vegetation, hurricane intensity and atmospheric moisture. 

>> Read more trending news 

The JPSS-1 will be launched from Vandenburg Air Force Base in California pending proper flight conditions. The launch was originally scheduled for Tuesday but was delayed until today.

This satellite is a polar orbiting satellite, which means it will orbit the earth from the one pole to the other passing the equator 14 times a day. Full coverage of the planet will be provided then twice a day.

NASA postpones JPSS-1 weather satellite launch

NASA, in partnership with the NOAA, scrubbed Tuesday’s launch of a weather satellite that will help improve weather forecasts due to a last-minute technical problem.

JPSS-1 is the first of a few polar orbiting satellites to launch from the Joint Polar Satellite System.

>> Read more trending news 

The satellites will help improve NOAA forecasts for the three- to seven-day time frame. The data collected from the JPSS is fed into the numerical forecast models to help improve them. The satellites will also collect atmospheric measurements, ground conditions and ocean conditions like vegetation, hurricane intensity, and atmospheric moisture.

The JPSS-1 was scheduled to be launched around 4:47 a.m. EST from Vandenburg Air Force Base in California. The launch has been postponed until Wednesday.

This satellite is a polar orbiting satellite, which means it will orbit the earth from the one pole to the other passing the equator 14 times a day. Full coverage of the planet will be provided then twice a day.

Surfing in Ohio? 911 calls pour in as men ride waves on raging river

Emergency dispatchers in Dayton, Ohio, received multiple 911 calls Monday reporting two people potentially drowning in the Great Miami River, bloated and raging after Sunday’s record rainfall.

But surfers Shannon Thomas and Josh Wright were having the times of their lives.

“I had a blast. It was probably one of the best surfs I’ve had in a while,” Thomas said.

>> Watch the video here

The professional river surfer was about to begin his last surf when ambulances, fire trucks, police and park rangers — and a water rescue boat — arrived near the River Run drop just upstream from the Monument Avenue bridge.

“Basically, people aren’t educated enough,” said Thomas, 32. “They see somebody in the river and they immediately think they are drowning. They can’t fathom why someone would be out there on a board surfing.”

>> On DaytonDailyNews.com: Tornadoes, record rain pound region, leave ‘pretty tremendous damage’

Thomas, a 2003 Fairmont High School graduate, said he and friend Wright were taking all the proper precautions: using a buddy system, wearing helmets, wetsuits, PDFs and outfitted with leashes that could quickly be released in case of entanglement.

“At no point were me or my buddy in distress,” said Thomas, who tapped his helmet at the arriving emergency responders, an international symbol that one is not in danger.

After exiting the river, Thomas said he had a 20-minute talk with the authorities.

>> Read more trending news

“They were basically threatening me with inciting or inducing panic,” said Thomas.

Thomas, who is sponsored by Badfish Stand Up Paddle, was not cited because he broke no laws, he said.

The wave created by the unusually high water is on par with one of the best river features in the nation, Thomas said.

“At that level it’s very similar to the Glenwood Springs, Colorado, wave, which is probably one of the most famous waves in the country,” he said.

New earthquake simulations show how the 'big one' could shake the Pacific Northwest

Fifty new simulations of "the big one” show how a magnitude 9.0 earthquake from the Cascadia Subduction Zone could play out.

>> Watch the news report here

The Cascadia Subduction Zone is a fault that sits along the bottom of the Pacific Ocean, and two plates colliding could eventually slip, triggering a massive earthquake that could shake the Northwest

More coverage on KIRO7.com:

>> SLIDESHOW: Geologic illustrations explain the Cascadia subduction

>> SLIDESHOW: How the 'big one' could play out

>> How to build a 7-day disaster emergency survival kit on a budget

>> Washington state's largest quake drill ever to test readiness for ‘the big one' 

>> Mexico's strongest earthquake in a century recorded at Mt. Rainier

>> 5 things to help you easily understand 'the big one' 

A University of Washington research project ran simulations using different combinations for three key factors: the epicenter of the earthquake, how far inland the earthquake will rupture and which sections of the fault will generate the strongest shaking.

The results show that the location at which the earthquake starts matters most, and the scenarios can drastically change depending on where the earthquake hits. 

One animation shows a scenario that’s bad for Seattle, in which an earthquake begins off the southern Oregon coast and the fault line breaks north, with seismic waves building up along the way. By contrast, a better scenario for Seattle would actually be an earthquake that begins closer – off the Olympic Peninsula – where the fault line breaks away from the city. 

But make no mistake, the magnitude 9.0 scenarios are bad, and models show the ground shaking for 100 seconds. That’s four times longer than it shook during the 2001 Nisqually quake, which, at magnitude 6.8, did plenty of damage and rattled many nerves.

>> Read more trending news 

"We know a magnitude 9.0 earthquake occurred in Cascadia in the year 1700, but we didn't have any seismometers or recording instruments at the time," said Erin Wirth, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Washington.

Wirth said scenarios show the level of shaking could be 10 times different depending on where the earthquake begins and the direction in which the fault line ruptures.

Past models have looked at one or two scenarios, but this is the first study with 50 scenarios. The point is to show the wide range of possibilities of a magnitude 9.0 earthquake. The next steps for researchers is to take this information and model the impacts on tsumamis, landslides and tall buildings in Seattle.

They hope that information will help planners and emergency managers prepare for "the big one."

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