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high school

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High school coach bloodied on sideline after headbutting player

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TV cameras captured some tense moments on the sidelines during the Georgia high school playoffs Friday night.

In a game between Colquitt County and Mill Creek, Colquitt coach Rush Propst appears to headbutt one of his players on the sideline in the second quarter.

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Moments later, blood was seen pouring from Propst's forehead.

Colquitt County is the defending AAAAAA state football champs. They beat Mill Creek 52-31 Friday and earned a spot in the state championship game.

Propst gained national notoriety on the MTV show "Two-a-Days" while coaching Hoover High School, a national football powerhouse.

High school coaches hilariously collide on sidelines during big play

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Two Texas high school football coaches are going viral for their (team's) touchdown dance that resulted from a blooper.

Seen from the upstairs coaching booth, Childress High School assistants are running the field on the sidelines as the special teams returns a blocked field goal for a touchdown. They both stumble before the score but get up in time to hug and jump with each other after it happens.

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Watch below:

WATCH: Childress Head Coach Jason Sims tweeted this video of two of his coaches racing down the sidelines after a big...Posted by NewsChannel10 on Thursday, November 5, 2015

High school football player suspended for 'praising God'

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A high school football player in Arizona could miss the school's first playoff game in 25 years after an official deemed a gesture to in praise of God as "excessive celebration."

Pedro Banda, 17, was flagged for unsportsmanlike conduct and ejected from a game last week after he pointed his index finger to the sky following a touchdown.

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The senior running back at Dysart High School in El Mirage, northwest of Phoenix, says he was praising God. The official and opposing coach believe he may have been taunting opponents.

Glendale coach Brian Bowman told the Arizona Republic the game was “chippy between players throughout” and felt that Banda was part of it.

“I know he got one (unsportsmanlike conduct penalty in the first quarter) when he got into it with one of our kids,” Bowman said. “They had given him a warning a couple of plays before his touchdown gave them a 28-0 lead with 4 minutes left. They gave him a warning and ejected one of our guys. It felt like taunting because it happened right after that.”

The unsportsmanlike penalty, coupled with the ejection for excessive celebration means Banda must serve a one game suspension. An appeal is being reviewed by the Arizona Interscholastic Association. The association's bylaw, however, states ejections are not subject to appeal.

Banda told Arizona TV station KNXV he will continue to do the gesture after scoring touchdowns.

“I just thank God for all the power he’s given me to play the game," Banda said. "And I just give the glory to Him.”

Texas high school football player dies after collapsing at game

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A Texas high school football player died Saturday after he collapsed during a game Friday night.

According to the Jacksonville Progress, Cam'Ron Matthews, a 16-year-old junior at Alto High School, was on the sidelines during a game against Price-Carlisle when he had a seizure and collapsed. Coaches and officials tended to him until a helicopter arrived to take him to East Texas Medical Center, where he died Saturday evening.

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“He was a great football player," Alto High School Athletic Director Paul Gould told KTRE. "He played offense and defense for us. He would do everything you ask him to do and did it well … just overall a great kid."

GoFundMe page set up for the teen's family had raised $5,685 by early Monday.

"He was an all-around great kid, athlete, strong in his faith & a friend to many," the page reads

Read more here and here.

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<script type='text/javascript' src='http://ktre.images.worldnow.com/interface/js/WNVideo.js?rnd=270497;hostDomain=www.KTRE.com;playerWidth=610;playerHeight=373;isShowIcon=true;clipId=11932369;flvUri=;partnerclipid=;adTag=News;advertisingZone=;enableAds=true;landingPage=;islandingPageoverride=false;playerType=STANDARD_EMBEDDEDscript;controlsType=fixed'></script>KTRE.com | Lufkin and Nacogdoches, Texas

Report: High school football coach admits he ordered players to hit referee

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An assistant football coach at a San Antonio, Texas, high school allegedly admitted that he told players to hit a refereeESPN reports.

According to ESPN, Mack Breed, a secondary coach at John Jay High School, told Principal Robert Harris that he ordered the hit because the referee, Robert Watts, missed calls and used racial slurs. Watts denied those allegations.

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The news came after two players appeared to blindside Watts in a video from a Sept. 4 game in Marble Falls. The clip, which was posted to YouTube the next day, has been viewed nearly 11 million times.

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The two players, who are 15 and 17, have been transferred to an alternative school. They could be allowed to return to John Jay High in January.

Read more here.

– The Cox Media Group National Content Desk contributed to this report.

Coach suspended after 161-2 rout

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You may expect a coach to be suspended for losing too many games. But what about when his team wins one?

That's exactly what happened to the head coach of a high school girls basketball team in California after they beat the other team 161-2.  

That is not a typo.  The Arroyo Valley High School girl's basketball team beat Bloomington High School  by nearly 160 points the Sporting News reported.

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But despite putting the bench in, they still scored and handily beat their opponents. 

That's where the suspension comes in.  According to the local newspaper, Arroyo Valley's school board suspended Michael Anderson for two games .

The Inland Valley Daily Bulletin reported Anderson played the starters for the first half and they scored an average of 13 points a minute, or 104 points in the first 16-minute half.

Some say putting the bench in the second half was too little too late.  The Daily Bulletin said Anderson should have slowed the game once it became obvious that the other team was no match.  They did report that Anderson imposed a 23-second wait on shots for his team. 

Another coach suggested in a Daily Bulletin story, that Anderson should have followed his lead when a score is one-sided and let the other side score and change the way the team played further, going so far as to not block a shot or steal the ball.  

As for the team, they handily beat their opponents in the first game of Anderson's suspension.  Arroyo Valley beat Indian Springs 80-19 Wednesday night.  Anderson will return courtside on Monday.

WATCH: Autistic high school football player scores team's final touchdown of season

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It was a touching moment on a high school football field near Pittsburgh when a player with autism helped end the season on a high note.

Valley High School junior Zach Clarke scored his first-ever touchdown, thanks in part to players from both sides of the field.

“I just ran up the middle and I was gone,” Clarke said. “I scored.”

The athletic departments from both Valley and Freeport schools worked the heartwarming end to the season out before Friday’s game.

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“I said, ‘I’ll give you the ball and you run to the end zone,’ and he said, ‘All right,’” quarterback Phillip Petit said.

Players from both teams celebrated with Clarke and carried him off the field on their shoulders. The crowd went wild cheering for Clarke, as well.

“The coaches were crying. The fans were crying. Everybody was crying,” Valley coach Muzzy Colosimo said.

The touchdown meant a lot to Clarke’s parents, who were at the game.

“I said to my husband, ‘Oh my gosh, he’s in,’” Clarke’s mother, Kathy Clarke, said. “And then, ‘Oh my gosh, he’s running for a touchdown.’”

The game’s final score: Freeport 39, Valley 30. The game was played at James E. Swartz Memorial Field in Freeport, Pennsylvania. Freeport is about 40 miles outside Pittsburgh in Armstrong County. 

“It’s definitely one of the moments that will live in my mind forever,” said Freeport quarterback Andrew Romanchack. “It was a moment that changes a person.”

3 deaths in 1 week: How risky is high school football?

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A 16-year-old high school football player died Wednesday following an on-field collision.

Tom Cutinella was a junior at Shoreham-Wading River High School. He was pronounced dead after collapsing during the third quarter of a varsity football game.  But school officials say football is not to blame.

STEVEN COHEN, Shoreham-Wading Superintendent WNBC: "It was the result of a typical football play.  It was just a freak accident."

Cutinella's death is the third death of a high school football player due to football-related injuries in a week.  Demario Harris Jr. of Troy, Alabama, died Friday after being tackled. That same day, Isaiah Langston of Rolesville High School collapsed and died during pre-game warm-ups.

That certainly makes for an eye-catching headline. But let's look at the overall numbers behind school football deaths.

In a 2013 study, The American Journal of Sports Medicine found football-related fatalities in high school and college average 12.2 per year.  That is about one in every 100,000 participants. Fatalities are most commonly from indirect causes, such as heat illness and cardiac failure. College football players are also 2.8 times more likely to suffer fatal injury than high schoolers.

And the popularity of college football may be an issue here. The New York Times paraphrases Kate Carr, president and chief executive of Safe Kids Worldwide, as saying that "some of the intense culture of professional and collegiate football is trickling down to the high school level."

Some school districts have instituted stricter practice and equipment guidelines in response to evidence that deaths have increased since 1994.

According to a study in the International Journal of Biometeorology, deaths from heat-related injuries nearly tripled from 1994 to 2009. Researchers said some of the increase may be explained by higher temperatures during practice times and an increase in average BMI among football players, though those are only a couple of possible factors.

Students and teammates held a candlelight vigil for Cutinella on the school's football field Thursday.  Cutinella's grandfather told The New York Times that even though there are risks associated with football, he would never ask his grandsons to quit playing.

 

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