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John McCain takes apparent jab at Trump during interview about Vietnam War

Sen. John McCain appeared to take a swipe at President Donald Trump during an interview about the Vietnam War on CSPAN-3 American History TV, criticizing people from “the highest income level” who avoided the military draft by finding a doctor who would say that “they had a bone spur,” CNN reported.

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Trump attended the New York Military Academy as a young man and received five military draft deferments during the Vietnam War, CNN reported. One was a medical deferment after he was diagnosed with bone spurs in his foot. 

It’s the latest war of words between the Arizona Republican and the president. During the early stages of the 2016 presidential campaign, Trump claimed McCain was not a was hero because he was captured during the Vietnam War. Trump never apologized for the remarks, and McCain has since been one of his most vocal Republican critics in Congress, CNN reported.

“One aspect of the conflict, by the way, that I will never ever countenance is that we drafted the lowest income level of America and the highest income level found a doctor that would say they had a bone spur,” McCain told C-SPAN3. “That is wrong. That is wrong. If we are going to ask every American to serve, every American should serve.”

McCain never mentions Trump by name in the interview, but the President's deferment because of a bone spur is widely known and his family was well off at the time.

Trump told The New York Times in 2016 that a doctor "gave me a letter -- a very strong letter -- on the heels."

"Over a period of time, it healed up," he said.

McCain spent five years as a prisoner of war during the Vietnam War, declining to be released despite being the son of an admiral.

Air Force may recall up to 1,000 retired pilots

The U.S. Air Force may recall as many as 1,000 retired military pilots to active duty because of an executive order signed Friday by President Donald Trump,  ABC News reported.

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By law, only 25 retired pilots can be recalled through voluntary programs to serve in any one branch of military service, but Trump’s executive order removes that limit, ABC News reported. The order expands the national state of emergency declared in 2001 by President George W. Bush in the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks as part of an effort “to mitigate the Air Force’s acute shortage of pilots,” said Navy Commander Gary Ross, a Pentagon spokesman.

Secretary of Air Force Heather Wilson said the service was short by 1,555 pilots -- including 1,211 fighter pilots -- at the end of the 2016 fiscal year.

"We anticipate that the Secretary of Defense will delegate the authority to the Secretary of the Air Force to recall up to 1,000 retired pilots for up to three years," Ross said in a statement Friday. "The pilot supply shortage is a national level challenge that could have adverse effects on all aspects of both the government and commercial aviation sectors for years to come."

Australia receives ‘unprecedented’ letter from North Korea

In an unusual step, North Korea has sent an open letter addressed to parliaments in several countries, declaring itself a “full-fledged nuclear power” and accusing President Donald Trump of “trying to drive the world into a horrible nuclear disaster,” CNN reported.

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Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop called the letter, dated Sept. 28, “unprecedented” and posted a copy of the cover letter on her verified Facebook page.

Her office confirmed to CNN that the letter, which was published by The Sydney Morning Herald, was genuine.

The letter appears to have been distributed a week after Trump’s address to the United Nations Security Council, after the president said that if the United States was forced to defend itself or its allies, it would have no choice “but to totally destroy North Korea.”

In the letter, North Korea condemned Trump’s statement and reiterated that it was tantamount to a declaration of war, CNN reported.

In the letter, North Korea condemned that statement as tantamount to a declaration of war, something North Korean officials said shortly after the speech. The United States denied that Trump had declared war on North Korea, which is also known as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.

“If Trump thinks that he would bring the DPRK (Democratic People's Republic of Korea), a nuclear power, to its knees through nuclear war threat, it will be a big miscalculation and an expression of ignorance,” the letter said, according to CNN.

"I see (the letter) it as evidence that the collective strategy of imposing maximum diplomatic and economic pressure through sanctions on North Korea is working," Bishop said.

4 soldiers killed in ambush: Where is Niger and what are U.S. troops doing there?

Questions remain in the aftermath of an ambush attack on a group including U.S. Army soldiers in Niger that left four American service members dead on Oct. 4.

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Defense Department officials said Staff Sgt. Bryan Black, 35, Staff Sgt. Jeremiah Johnson, 39, Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright, 29 and Sgt. La David Johnson, 25, were killed in an attack during an advise-and-assist mission in southwestern Niger.

The circumstances that led to the attack remain under investigation.

The American military operation in Niger is one of about 20 in Africa and part of the U.S. Africa Command, according to NPR. The command is aimed at building military relations with African nations and other key players in the region. It began operations in 2007.

Here is what we know about Niger and U.S. military presence in the country:

Where is Niger?

Niger is a landlocked country in western Africa, bordered by Chad, Nigeria, Benin, Burkina Faso, Mali, Algeria and Libya.

The country became independent from France in 1960. Political instability and a series of military coups followed.

Is Niger generally safe for Americans?

The U.S. State Department in April issued a warning for Americans traveling in Niger to stay away from “locations frequented by Westerners” and to keep to hotels with armed Nigerien security officers because of the risk of terror attacks and kidnapping threats against Westerners.

“Niger’s southeastern border with Nigeria and east of Maradi are poorly controlled,” State Department officials said. “Boko Haram and several factions affiliated with ISIS have conducted cross-border attacks into Niger. The government of Niger has increased its security forces in the border areas, but the situation remains unstable and travel is not advised.”

What about for soldiers – is it generally safe?

Despite the threat of violence, officials said the Oct. 4 deaths were the first American service members to be killed in combat in Niger.

“I think clearly there's risk for our forces in Niger,” said Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Kenneth F. McKenzie, the director of the Joint Staff. “Any time we deploy full forces globally, we will look very hard at the enablers that need to be in place in order to provide security for them. And that ranges from the ability to pull them out if they are injured, to the ability to reinforce them at the point of a fight if they … need reinforcement. We look at all those things and evaluate on a continual basis.”

How big is the American military presence there?

Officials with the Defense Department said this month that about 1,000 troops in the region work with about 4,000 French service members. The U.S. military has had some presence in the country since 2012, according to CNN.

What are U.S. soldiers doing there?

Pentagon spokeswoman Dana White said U.S. armed forces have been working for years with West African nations to combat the threat of terrorism.

The Army soldiers killed in the Oct. 4 attack were assisting with Nigerien security force counterterrorism operations about 125 miles north of Niamey, the country’s capitol city, according to thee Defense Department.

“We’re providing refueling support, intelligence support, surveillance support,” Defense Secretary James Mattis said. “But also we have troops on the ground. Their job is to help the people in the region learn how to defend themselves. We call it foreign internal defense training, and we actually do these kinds of missions by, with and through our allies.”

Taliban hostage rescued after 5 years in captivity didn't believe Trump was president

A Canadian man who had been held in Afghanistan for five years by Taliban-tied kidnappers revealed that he thought his kidnapper was joking when he said Donald Trump was president of the United States.

Joshua Boyle said one of his captors told him Trump was president just before he was forced to film a “proof-of-life” video, according to the Toronto Star.

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“It didn’t enter my mind that he was being serious,” Boyle said.

The Boyle family, including Joshua, his American-born wife, Caitlan Coleman, and their three young children, who were all born in captivity, were rescued by Pakistani forces after U.S. intelligence informed them of the of the family’s location.

The family was in the trunk of a car being transferred to another location when their kidnappers engaged in a shootout with Pakistani forces. Some of their kidnappers died in the fight while others fled, but the entire family made it to safety.

Iran nuclear deal: What to know about Trump's aggressive new strategy

UPDATE 1:30 p.m. ET:

President Donald Trump said Friday during a news conference that Iran is not living up to the “spirit” of the nuclear deal signed in 2015.

Trump criticized the deal, calling it “one of the worst” and most “one-sided transactions the United States has ever entered into.”  

>> Full transcript: Read President Trump’s remarks about the Iran nuclear deal 

The president’s new strategy will include tougher sanctions that will aim to deny the Iranian regime all paths to nuclear weapons.

>> Here is President Trump’s new strategy on Iran

ORIGINAL REPORT:

President Donald Trump is expected to announce an aggressive new strategy toward Iran on Friday, disavowing the 2015 nuclear accord that was negotiated by his predecessor, Barack Obama. But Trump will stop short -- at least for now -- of scrapping the agreement or even rewriting it.

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"It is time for the entire world to join us in demanding that Iran’s government end its pursuit of death and destruction,” Trump said in a statement released early Friday.

Here are some things to know about Trump’s actions on the accord, which was signed by the United States, Iran, Britain, France, Germany, Russia, China and the European Union.

  • In his remarks, scheduled for 12:45 p.m. Friday, Trump will declare his intention not to certify Iran’s compliance with the deal. But the move does not amount to tearing up the deal, which was a promise he made during his run for the presidency in 2016.

  • Trump will send the agreement to Congress, which will have 60 days to determine a policy. 

  • If Congress imposes new punitive economic sanctions on Iran, the nuclear deal likely would fall through. However, Trump wants legislators to adopt new measures to keep it in place and define parameters by which the United States would impose new sanctions in the event Iran violates its agreements.

  • Some of the violations could be defined as continued ballistic launches by Iran, refusal to extend its constraints on the production of nuclear fuel, or if U.S. intelligence agencies conclude that Iran could produce a nuclear weapon in a year or less.

  • Two times, Trump reluctantly certified the deal, but told his top advisers that he would no longer do it. To do so, he asserted, would make it appear that the president was breaking his campaign process.

  • Iran has rejected reopening the accord or negotiating a new one. 

In his statement Friday, Trump said his decision was the “culmination of nine months of deliberation” with Congress and U.S. allies on how to best protect American security.

Trump meets military leaders, mentions ‘calm before the storm’

Posing with military leaders and their spouses for photographs before a dinner at the White House on Thursday, President Donald Trump was ambiguous as spoke of “the calm before the storm,” CNN reported.

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“You guys know what this represents? Maybe it's the calm before the storm,” Trump said after a meeting with his top military commanders.

When reporters pressed him on what the statement meant, Trump replied: “It could be, the calm, the calm before the storm.”

Reporters asked if the storm was related to Iran or ISIS.

“We have the world's great military people in this room, I will tell you that. And uh, we're gonna have a great evening, thank you all for coming.”

When reporters persisted, Trump said, “You'll find out.”

Doctors who treated Pulse victims prepared Las Vegas hospital for mass shooting

Doctors who worked on victims and survivors of the Pulse nightclub shooting in June, 2016 were in Las Vegas discussing what they learned with doctors.

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The doctors from Orlando Regional Medical Center were in Las Vegas two weeks before Sunday’s deadly concert mass shooting.

“The horror of their tragedy was so similar to ours,” said Dr. Gary Parrish, ORMC medical director of the emergency department.

At Pulse nightclub in June 2016, 49 people were killed and more than 50 others were injured in Orlando.

More than 50 were killed Sunday night and hundreds of others were injured at a country concert in Las Vegas when a gunman at Mandalay Bay hotel opened fire.

Parrish ran ORMC’s department on the night of Pulse, and two months ago he spoke to Nevada’s only Level I trauma center UMC in Las Vegas.

Parrish said that he shared his experience from the moments, days, even months after the massacre at Pulse.

>> Las Vegas shooting: Remembering the victims

"What I told them was they need to be prepared for the rest of the story,” Parrish said.

Parrish said every major hospital trains for mass casualty events, but he wanted medical staff in Las Vegas to know what he felt his team wasn't quite ready for.

"The patient identification process. The family reunification process,” Parrish said.

He said the damage caused by higher velocity firearms doesn't compare to a typical gunshot wound.

"I have no doubt those injuries were more severe than they might otherwise see,” Parrish said.

Parrish said the experience sticks with him and likely always will. He knows Las Vegas doctors and nurses will understand that soon, too. He just hopes sharing his story helped them cope a little better with their own.

"I tell them, I hope it never happens again. But the reason they're interested in having some of our staff there is because we all have a sense that it's very likely this may happen again,” Parrish said.

3 US troops killed in ambush in Niger

Three members of the U.S. Special Operations Forces were killed and two others were wounded in southwest Niger when a patrol was attacked Wednesday, CNN reported.

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The administration officials said the two wounded U.S. troops had been evacuated to Niger’s capital city of Niamey and would soon be moved to Germany. They were described by the officials as being in a "stable condition," CNN reported.

The U.S. troops were part of a team advising and assisting local forces when they were attacked.

U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Anthony Falvo, a spokesman for U.S. Africa Command, told CNN late Wednesday that "a joint U.S. and Nigerien patrol came under hostile fire in southwest Niger," but said that the military was still "working to confirm details on the incident."

Racial slurs found at Air Force Academy; superintendent has harsh words for cadets

An investigation continues into who wrote racial slurs on the message boards of five African-American cadet candidates at the U.S. Air Force Academy Preparatory School outside Denver.

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The school was established to mold students who show leadership and other qualities that make them potentially strong applicants to the academy, but need to work on their academics before they’re admitted to the military academy, The Washington Post reported.

The messages were discovered Monday and were first reported on by The Air Force Times.

One of the cadet candidates’ mothers put the a photo of the slur on her Facebook page showing that the message left said “go home" and then the slur.

She posted, “This is why I’m so hurt! These young people are supposed to bond and protect each other and the country. Who would my son have to watch out for? The enemy or the enemy?”

The father of the same cadet told The Air Force Times the messages were “utter stupidity,” adding, “That word has zero power in my house.”

The father said that his son is fine after the messages were left.

The Air Force Academy’s superintendent, Lt. Gen. Jay Silveria, had harsh words for those who posted the message.

“There is absolutely no place in our Air Force for racism -- it’s not who we are, nor will we tolerate it in any shape of fashion. Period. Those who don’t understand that are behind the power curve and better catch up,” ABC News reported.

Silveria said during his address to the cadet wing and the prep school students Thursday, “If you can’t treat someone with dignity and respect, then you need to get out. If you can’t treat someone from another gender whether it’s a man or a woman with dignity and respect, then you need to get out. If you demean someone in any way, then you need to get out. And if you can’t treat someone from another race or a different colored skin with dignity and respect, then you need to get out.”

The the academy’s security detail is investigating, but no further information has been released, The Air Force Times reported.

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