Now Playing
KISS104 FM
Last Song Played
Today's R&B and Throwbacks
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
KISS104 FM
Last Song Played
Today's R&B and Throwbacks

local

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >

Show me the money! UGA assistant coaches get raises

The Georgia Bulldogs’ run to the College Football Playoff National Championship Game wouldn’t have been possible without the work of Kirby Smart’s staff.

And now they’re going to be compensated because of it.

Smart’s 10 on-field assistants will earn nearly $2 million more in 2018 than they did in 2017.

In 2017, Smart’s assistants made $4.56 million. In 2018, they’ll make $6.42 million.

Defensive Coordinator Mel Tucker has received a raise to $1.5 million, up from $900,000 last year. Georgia’s defense was one of the best in the country this past season.

Assistant coach James Coley, who is expected to move from receivers coach to another position, has been bumped to $850,000 from $450,000 last year.

Coley turned down a job offer from Texas A&M to become offensive coordinator.

Offensive line coach Sam Pittman will now earn $825,000, after earning $660,000 last year. 

Offensive coordinator Jim Chaney received a $100,000 raise and will now earn $950,000.

Strength and conditioning coordinator Scott Sinclair also received a significant bump and will now earn $450,000. Sinclair earned $300,000 last year. 

2018 staff:

  • Mel Tucker - $1,500,000
  • Jim Chaney - $950,000
  • James Coley - $850,000
  • Sam Pittman - $825,000
  • Dell McGee - $550,000
  • Tray Scott - $420,000
  • Cortez Hankton - $375,000
  • Glenn Schumann - $325,000
  • Dan Lanning - $325,000
  • Scott Fountain - $300,000 

2017 staff: 

  • Mel Tucker - $900,000
  • Jim Chaney - $850,000
  • Sam Pittman - $660,000
  • James Coley - $450,000
  • Tray Scott - $400,000
  • Kevin Sherrer - $375,000
  • Dell McGee - $350,000
  • Shane Beamer - $300,000
  • Glenn Schumann - $275,000

Smart himself is expected to receive a substantial increase from his $3.75 million base salary, but that has not been announced yet. 

New roles and titles on the staff could also be in order, but were not announced. 

Georgia’s salary rule compares favorably with that of the staffs of two other powerhouse programs, who have also announced their assistant coach salaries for 2018. 

Ohio State’s assistant coaches now make $7.06 million, with raises this offseason that totaled $3.4 million.

So it nearly doubled, helped by the addition of the 10th assistant coach, Alex Grinch, who received $800,000 to leave Washington State for Ohio State. 

Eight of Ohio State’s 10 assistants are earning at least $500,000. 

The salary pool for Clemson’s assistant coaches is now $6.58 million, with raises this offseason of just under $1 million.

Four of Clemson’s assistant coaches are earning at least $500,000.

This article was written by Seth Emerson, DawgNation.

Homeowners warn renters after teens caught on camera partying at their home

A lot of people rent out their homes on various booking sites to make some cash. It’s easy to do with just the click of a button.

But the problem is, you don’t really know who you are renting to.

Karren Harris has listed his condo in the heart of downtown Atlanta for nearly 3 1/2 years. He said any issues he had with guests were minor, until now.

“It wasn’t nothing as devastating. This time, it seems like they sought to take advantage,” Harris said. “It will be a while before I consider opening my home up again.”

Harris told Channel 2’s Lauren Pozen that rented out his condo on Airbnb for Valentine’s Day weekend.

After the guests’ stay, Harris said he came home to find someone had rummaged through his clothes and stolen his shoes and suits. 

TRENDING STORIES:

8-year-old girl dies hours after she was hit by car crossing street for bus Family says 7-year-old died of complications from flu Man says his mother's grave, others damaged by cemetery workers

“It was devastating. Memorabilia, paintings, my kids’ things -- all of the things I tried to put in my place to make someone else comfortable,” Harris said.

Pozen quickly learned Harris isn’t alone. Brady Mills, of Atlanta, said he spoke to renters who threw a raging party at his second home in Nashville. He went through the booking site RedAwning.

“Someone rented under a fake name and used a stolen credit card,” Mills said.

Mills showed Pozen video captured by his outdoor security cameras of the party that went on at his house.

“There’s probably about $10,000 worth of damage to the house,” Mills said.

He told Pozen that just one bad guest can really make you think twice about opening your home up to strangers.

“It is pretty disheartening when you pour your heart and soul into a house and it was a beautiful home,” Mills said.

Pozen spoke with an Airbnb official who said what happened in Harris' downtown condo is rare among the millions of bookings the company deals with daily.

That guest has been banned from the site.

There’s also a $1 million host guarantee and host protection service to cover hosts if something like this happens.

Airbnb also sent Pozen several things you can do to try and minimize things like this from happening to you:

  • Set Clear Expectations: Your listing description should let potential guests know about the unique features and amenities of your home. Even small details like the number of flights of stairs to your front door can help make sure guests enjoy their time with you. As a host, you can also outline specific expectations (like quiet hours) in your house rules.
  • Set Guest Requirements: Every guest is asked to provide their full name, date of birth, photo, phone number, email address, and payment information to Airbnb before booking. Home hosts also have the option to require guests to provide Airbnb with a government ID before booking their listing.
  • Read Profiles & Reviews: If you want to know more about a guest before accepting their reservation request, check out their profile or read reviews from past hosts. Hosts and guests can only review each other after a reservation is complete, so you know the feedback you’re reading is based on actual experiences.
  • Get to Know Your Guest in Advance: Our secure messaging tool gives you the chance to get to know guests and answer or ask any questions that come up before or during the trip. Messaging is also a great place to coordinate things like check-in or provide local recommendations.
  • Keep Safety Info & Equipment Handy: It’s important to equip your home and your guests with the safety essentials they might need during their trip. This includes things like a working smoke and carbon monoxide detector, a fire extinguisher, a first aid kit, and a fully completed online safety card.
  • If Anything Isn’t Right, Reach Out: In the rare event that an issue should arise, our team is available 24/7 in 11 languages to support you and your guests—all you have to do is reach out. We offer things like rebooking assistance, refunds, reimbursements, our $1 million Host Guarantee, and Host Protection Insurance program to help make things right.  

Homeowners warn renters after teens caught on camera partying at their home

A lot of people rent out their homes on various booking sites to make some cash. It’s easy to do with just the click of a button.

But the problem is, you don’t really know who you are renting to.

Karren Harris has listed his condo in the heart of downtown Atlanta for nearly 3 1/2 years. He said any issues he had with guests were minor, until now.

“It wasn’t nothing as devastating. This time, it seems like they sought to take advantage,” Harris said. “It will be a while before I consider opening my home up again.”

Harris told Channel 2’s Lauren Pozen that rented out his condo on Airbnb for Valentine’s Day weekend.

After the guests’ stay, Harris said he came home to find someone had rummaged through his clothes and stolen his shoes and suits. 

TRENDING STORIES:

8-year-old girl dies hours after she was hit by car crossing street for bus Family says 7-year-old died of complications from flu Man says his mother's grave, others damaged by cemetery workers

“It was devastating. Memorabilia, paintings, my kids’ things -- all of the things I tried to put in my place to make someone else comfortable,” Harris said.

Pozen quickly learned Harris isn’t alone. Brady Mills, of Atlanta, said he spoke to renters who threw a raging party at his second home in Nashville. He went through the booking site RedAwning.

“Someone rented under a fake name and used a stolen credit card,” Mills said.

Mills showed Pozen video captured by his outdoor security cameras of the party that went on at his house.

“There’s probably about $10,000 worth of damage to the house,” Mills said.

He told Pozen that just one bad guest can really make you think twice about opening your home up to strangers.

“It is pretty disheartening when you pour your heart and soul into a house and it was a beautiful home,” Mills said.

Pozen spoke with an Airbnb official who said what happened in Harris' downtown condo is rare among the millions of bookings the company deals with daily.

That guest has been banned from the site.

There’s also a $1 million host guarantee and host protection service to cover hosts if something like this happens.

Airbnb also sent Pozen several things you can do to try and minimize things like this from happening to you:

  • Set Clear Expectations: Your listing description should let potential guests know about the unique features and amenities of your home. Even small details like the number of flights of stairs to your front door can help make sure guests enjoy their time with you. As a host, you can also outline specific expectations (like quiet hours) in your house rules.
  • Set Guest Requirements: Every guest is asked to provide their full name, date of birth, photo, phone number, email address, and payment information to Airbnb before booking. Home hosts also have the option to require guests to provide Airbnb with a government ID before booking their listing.
  • Read Profiles & Reviews: If you want to know more about a guest before accepting their reservation request, check out their profile or read reviews from past hosts. Hosts and guests can only review each other after a reservation is complete, so you know the feedback you’re reading is based on actual experiences.
  • Get to Know Your Guest in Advance: Our secure messaging tool gives you the chance to get to know guests and answer or ask any questions that come up before or during the trip. Messaging is also a great place to coordinate things like check-in or provide local recommendations.
  • Keep Safety Info & Equipment Handy: It’s important to equip your home and your guests with the safety essentials they might need during their trip. This includes things like a working smoke and carbon monoxide detector, a fire extinguisher, a first aid kit, and a fully completed online safety card.
  • If Anything Isn’t Right, Reach Out: In the rare event that an issue should arise, our team is available 24/7 in 11 languages to support you and your guests—all you have to do is reach out. We offer things like rebooking assistance, refunds, reimbursements, our $1 million Host Guarantee, and Host Protection Insurance program to help make things right.  

Girl wants to protect others after DFCS mistakenly took her from school

A Gwinnett County father said his daughter has been scared for months after she was mistakenly pulled out of school by the Division of Family and Children Services.

Sean Harris said his daughter, who was 7-years-old at the time, never made it to her after-school program, and for hours he had no idea where she was.

DFCS had taken the girl out of class at Rosebud Elementary School and driven her to the Rockdale County DFCS office. But they had the wrong child.

The two girls at the school had the same first and last names, but with a different spelling. Their birthdays were also different.

The department said at the time that it relies on schools to ensure they have the right child.

“That night, she was terrified. She cried all night,” Harris said. “The school provided a counselor the next morning but we took her to more professional licensed personnel.”

TRENDING STORIES:

8-year-old girl dies hours after she was hit by car crossing street for bus Siblings from metro Atlanta recount terror during Florida school shooting Man says his mother's grave, others damaged by cemetery workers

Harris’ daughter, Kennedi, is now trying to turn what happened to her into something positive.

With the help of her parents, Kennedi started the company K-Lock, making items including identification lockets that include the child’s name, emergency contact and school.

“So I don’t get lost again and no one else will go through what I did,” she said.

Harris said the company serves an even bigger purpose for his daughter.

“To give her a coping mechanism to be able to deal with that traumatic experience and just see that her confidence is coming back,” he said.

Kennedi has flourished with her new purpose, and even spoke at her school’s career day.

Harris said state officials are still working to improve procedures to keep this from happening again.

Girl wants to protect others after DFCS mistakenly took her from school

A Gwinnett County father said his daughter has been scared for months after she was mistakenly pulled out of school by the Division of Family and Children Services.

Sean Harris said his daughter, who was 7-years-old at the time, never made it to her after-school program, and for hours he had no idea where she was.

DFCS had taken the girl out of class at Rosebud Elementary School and driven her to the Rockdale County DFCS office. But they had the wrong child.

The two girls at the school had the same first and last names, but with a different spelling. Their birthdays were also different.

The department said at the time that it relies on schools to ensure they have the right child.

“That night, she was terrified. She cried all night,” Harris said. “The school provided a counselor the next morning but we took her to more professional licensed personnel.”

TRENDING STORIES:

8-year-old girl dies hours after she was hit by car crossing street for bus Siblings from metro Atlanta recount terror during Florida school shooting Man says his mother's grave, others damaged by cemetery workers

Harris’ daughter, Kennedi, is now trying to turn what happened to her into something positive.

With the help of her parents, Kennedi started the company K-Lock, making items including identification lockets that include the child’s name, emergency contact and school.

“So I don’t get lost again and no one else will go through what I did,” she said.

Harris said the company serves an even bigger purpose for his daughter.

“To give her a coping mechanism to be able to deal with that traumatic experience and just see that her confidence is coming back,” he said.

Kennedi has flourished with her new purpose, and even spoke at her school’s career day.

Harris said state officials are still working to improve procedures to keep this from happening again.

Atlanta teens reflect on growing up in a world of school shootings

In the wake of the tragedy in Parkland, Florida, some local students are reflecting on the world they're growing up in and what they can do about it.

They were born after the shooting at Columbine, heard about Sandy Hook in middle school and now deal with this week's shooting as they prepare to graduate.

Channel 2's Lori Wilson sat down with students at The Galloway School in Atlanta. They are 17- and 18-year-old seniors. They’ve only known a world where shootings at a school could happen anywhere, anytime.

“As a high school student it was terrifying, but it wasn’t surprising because it’s one of the norms that are present in our generation today,” said Courtney Copeland.

Seniors who should be thinking about summer plans, graduation, and the future, are now having to think about mortality and the fear and violence that took place at a Florida high school this week.

“You feel people, you may not know them, but they are kids just like you,” said Wesley Hardin.

“This can happen anywhere, anytime, at concerts, at schools, at sporting events,” said Dean Kopitsky. “This kind of pattern makes me feel that we can all be victims at any time, and what is really there to protect us?”

They found out 17 people were shot and killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School through social media.

“It pops up as a notification on my home screen,” said Morgan Mattke. “(It was) on my way home after practice, along with a bunch of other messages, which in itself is very heartbreaking that it can be lost in a wave of social media.”

On Thursday, they stopped to process what happened.

“Although I feel safe at school, I know it can happen any time at any school,” said Copeland.

TRENDING STORIES:

8-year-old girl dies hours after she was hit by car crossing street for bus Siblings from metro Atlanta recount terror during Florida school shooting Man says his mother's grave, others damaged by cemetery workers

“A school should not need a gun. It should be a safe protected place,” said India Stevenson.

“It is honestly scary to live in a world like this where things like this can just keep happening, yet nothing is changing,” said senior Jaden Burris.

This group said that change can happen person to person, and in the political arena.

“It’s about prioritizing lives over hobbies,” said Mattke.

“I think we are so quick to blame government officials and policy changers,” said Copeland. “And sometimes, it’s us to blame. Sometimes we can have compassion for others because we don’t know what they’re going through that day.”

“We are not doing what is necessary to address the problem that we have at hand,” said Burris.

“(Years ago) there was talk of arming teachers as one of the ways to prevent school shootings, and I feel like we haven’t really made much progress since that discussion, which wasn’t really a good starting place to begin with,"Kopitsky said.

“No one wants this to happen,” said Hardin.

“Either side of the aisle, everyone is trying to prevent it,” said Mattke, “That policy decision is going to be made in D.C., away from all these schools that are experiencing these shootings.”

“If a lot of people are passionate and show compassion, there will be people working to change this and as long as there are people who are trying to make a difference, I think we’ll see results," said Stevenson.

“We have to fix the mistakes that the older generation made,” said Burris. “So either we start doing it now, or we’re going to have to have our sons or daughters have to deal with these mistakes, and that’s not something I plan on letting happen.”

Atlanta teens reflect on growing up in a world of school shootings

In the wake of the tragedy in Parkland, Florida, some local students are reflecting on the world they're growing up in and what they can do about it.

They were born after the shooting at Columbine, heard about Sandy Hook in middle school and now deal with this week's shooting as they prepare to graduate.

Channel 2's Lori Wilson sat down with students at The Galloway School in Atlanta. They are 17- and 18-year-old seniors. They’ve only known a world where shootings at a school could happen anywhere, anytime.

“As a high school student it was terrifying, but it wasn’t surprising because it’s one of the norms that are present in our generation today,” said Courtney Copeland.

Seniors who should be thinking about summer plans, graduation, and the future, are now having to think about mortality and the fear and violence that took place at a Florida high school this week.

“You feel people, you may not know them, but they are kids just like you,” said Wesley Hardin.

“This can happen anywhere, anytime, at concerts, at schools, at sporting events,” said Dean Kopitsky. “This kind of pattern makes me feel that we can all be victims at any time, and what is really there to protect us?”

They found out 17 people were shot and killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School through social media.

“It pops up as a notification on my home screen,” said Morgan Mattke. “(It was) on my way home after practice, along with a bunch of other messages, which in itself is very heartbreaking that it can be lost in a wave of social media.”

On Thursday, they stopped to process what happened.

“Although I feel safe at school, I know it can happen any time at any school,” said Copeland.

TRENDING STORIES:

8-year-old girl dies hours after she was hit by car crossing street for bus Siblings from metro Atlanta recount terror during Florida school shooting Man says his mother's grave, others damaged by cemetery workers

“A school should not need a gun. It should be a safe protected place,” said India Stevenson.

“It is honestly scary to live in a world like this where things like this can just keep happening, yet nothing is changing,” said senior Jaden Burris.

This group said that change can happen person to person, and in the political arena.

“It’s about prioritizing lives over hobbies,” said Mattke.

“I think we are so quick to blame government officials and policy changers,” said Copeland. “And sometimes, it’s us to blame. Sometimes we can have compassion for others because we don’t know what they’re going through that day.”

“We are not doing what is necessary to address the problem that we have at hand,” said Burris.

“(Years ago) there was talk of arming teachers as one of the ways to prevent school shootings, and I feel like we haven’t really made much progress since that discussion, which wasn’t really a good starting place to begin with,"Kopitsky said.

“No one wants this to happen,” said Hardin.

“Either side of the aisle, everyone is trying to prevent it,” said Mattke, “That policy decision is going to be made in D.C., away from all these schools that are experiencing these shootings.”

“If a lot of people are passionate and show compassion, there will be people working to change this and as long as there are people who are trying to make a difference, I think we’ll see results," said Stevenson.

“We have to fix the mistakes that the older generation made,” said Burris. “So either we start doing it now, or we’re going to have to have our sons or daughters have to deal with these mistakes, and that’s not something I plan on letting happen.”

Secretary of State's office looking into alleged vote-buying in Milton

The Georgia Secretary of State’s Office is investigating allegations of vote-buying during last November’s Milton city election, but all three candidates implicated deny any wrongdoing.

The complaint, filed by Bill Lusk, who lost his seat to newcomer Laura Bentley, points to a Facebook post on a page called “We Call Milton Home,” that offered voters a chance to be entered into a drawing for pizza gift certificates if they took a picture with an “I voted sticker” in front of campaign signs for Bentley, candidate Peyton Jamison, and incumbent Mayor Joe Lockwood.

“It was essentially an effort to buy votes,” Lusk told Channel 2’s Mike Petchenik. “It may not rise to the level of national security, but it’s a violation of our legal system and I think voters need to know what’s going on.”

Lusk showed Petchenik a January 29th letter from a Secretary of State investigator in which he signaled an official investigation would be launched into the allegation.

TRENDING STORIES:

8-year-old girl dies hours after she was hit by car crossing street for bus Family says 7-year-old died of complications from flu Man says his mother's grave, others damaged by cemetery workers

Petchenik received a statement from a spokeswoman for the Secretary of State, Candice Broce:

“Because it is an ongoing investigation, I cannot discuss any further details at this time. Generally speaking, once our office completes an investigation, our investigators present their findings to the State Election Board, which makes the ultimate determination on whether Georgia election laws or rules have been violated. The board can decide to dismiss the case; issue a letter of instruction, which explains what law or rule was violated and orders the respondent from committing additional violations; or bind the case over to the Attorney General’s office. The case can also be referred to the local district attorney’s office for prosecution. I cannot provide a timeline on how long it might take to complete the investigation.

"The code section on point is O.C.G.A. 21-2-570: “Any person who gives or receives, offers to give or receive, or participates in the giving or receiving of money or gifts for the purpose of registering as a voter, voting, or voting for a particular candidate in any primary or election shall be guilty of a felony.

"On background, our investigators look into every complaint that we receive, which can be hundreds of complaints for each election cycle. That being said, these kinds of investigations are fairly commonplace, and the State Election Board will take every fact into account as they analyze the case.”

Petchenik reached out to all three candidates, who won their respective seats.

Jamison, who ran unopposed, told Petchenik:

“Representatives from the Secretary of State’s Office did reach out to me regarding an investigation they apparently are conducting into a Facebook page, ‘We Call Milton Home.’ I confirmed with them that I am not connected to the administration or ownership of that site and that I neither asked for nor condoned the alleged behavior of the site’s owner/administrator. I ran unopposed in the election in question.”

Bentley sent Petchenik this statement:

“The Secretary of State has received my full cooperation with the investigation of the ‘We Call Milton Home’ Facebook page. I am not the operator nor do I direct content for this site. Mr. Lusk was my opponent for the District 2, Post 1 City Council election last November.”

Mayor Joe Lockwood also sent Petchenik a statement:

"I am not, or ever was, affiliated with the ‘We call Milton Home’ Facebook page, nor do I have any involvement with the posts offered by the account owner and/or administrator of this account. I take these allegations very seriously and have made it clear that I would never condone such an activity, as well as never be a part of it. I am confident neither of the other candidates mentioned would either.

"As to the Secretary of State investigation, I have fully cooperated and responded that I have absolutely no involvement in anything with this issue.

"It is my opinion that this was an honest mistake by an individual, or individuals, on Facebook that meant no harm, nor any ill will, in any way, and from what I understand actually gave nothing away."

In a message to Petchenik, the page’s administrator told him: “Yes, I can confirm that they did not direct me to do any of that.”

Petchenik pressed that person to give him their name, but they declined.

“The people behind Bill Lusk’s camp are behind the complaint on this and they continue to be on a witch hunt,” they said to Petchenik.

Lusk told Petchenik he’s hopeful there will be some kind of resolution to the issue.

Secretary of State's office looking into alleged vote-buying in Milton

The Georgia Secretary of State’s Office is investigating allegations of vote-buying during last November’s Milton city election, but all three candidates implicated deny any wrongdoing.

The complaint, filed by Bill Lusk, who lost his seat to newcomer Laura Bentley, points to a Facebook post on a page called “We Call Milton Home,” that offered voters a chance to be entered into a drawing for pizza gift certificates if they took a picture with an “I voted sticker” in front of campaign signs for Bentley, candidate Peyton Jamison, and incumbent Mayor Joe Lockwood.

“It was essentially an effort to buy votes,” Lusk told Channel 2’s Mike Petchenik. “It may not rise to the level of national security, but it’s a violation of our legal system and I think voters need to know what’s going on.”

Lusk showed Petchenik a January 29th letter from a Secretary of State investigator in which he signaled an official investigation would be launched into the allegation.

TRENDING STORIES:

8-year-old girl dies hours after she was hit by car crossing street for bus Family says 7-year-old died of complications from flu Man says his mother's grave, others damaged by cemetery workers

Petchenik received a statement from a spokeswoman for the Secretary of State, Candice Broce:

“Because it is an ongoing investigation, I cannot discuss any further details at this time. Generally speaking, once our office completes an investigation, our investigators present their findings to the State Election Board, which makes the ultimate determination on whether Georgia election laws or rules have been violated. The board can decide to dismiss the case; issue a letter of instruction, which explains what law or rule was violated and orders the respondent from committing additional violations; or bind the case over to the Attorney General’s office. The case can also be referred to the local district attorney’s office for prosecution. I cannot provide a timeline on how long it might take to complete the investigation.

"The code section on point is O.C.G.A. 21-2-570: “Any person who gives or receives, offers to give or receive, or participates in the giving or receiving of money or gifts for the purpose of registering as a voter, voting, or voting for a particular candidate in any primary or election shall be guilty of a felony.

"On background, our investigators look into every complaint that we receive, which can be hundreds of complaints for each election cycle. That being said, these kinds of investigations are fairly commonplace, and the State Election Board will take every fact into account as they analyze the case.”

Petchenik reached out to all three candidates, who won their respective seats.

Jamison, who ran unopposed, told Petchenik:

“Representatives from the Secretary of State’s Office did reach out to me regarding an investigation they apparently are conducting into a Facebook page, ‘We Call Milton Home.’ I confirmed with them that I am not connected to the administration or ownership of that site and that I neither asked for nor condoned the alleged behavior of the site’s owner/administrator. I ran unopposed in the election in question.”

Bentley sent Petchenik this statement:

“The Secretary of State has received my full cooperation with the investigation of the ‘We Call Milton Home’ Facebook page. I am not the operator nor do I direct content for this site. Mr. Lusk was my opponent for the District 2, Post 1 City Council election last November.”

Mayor Joe Lockwood also sent Petchenik a statement:

"I am not, or ever was, affiliated with the ‘We call Milton Home’ Facebook page, nor do I have any involvement with the posts offered by the account owner and/or administrator of this account. I take these allegations very seriously and have made it clear that I would never condone such an activity, as well as never be a part of it. I am confident neither of the other candidates mentioned would either.

"As to the Secretary of State investigation, I have fully cooperated and responded that I have absolutely no involvement in anything with this issue.

"It is my opinion that this was an honest mistake by an individual, or individuals, on Facebook that meant no harm, nor any ill will, in any way, and from what I understand actually gave nothing away."

In a message to Petchenik, the page’s administrator told him: “Yes, I can confirm that they did not direct me to do any of that.”

Petchenik pressed that person to give him their name, but they declined.

“The people behind Bill Lusk’s camp are behind the complaint on this and they continue to be on a witch hunt,” they said to Petchenik.

Lusk told Petchenik he’s hopeful there will be some kind of resolution to the issue.

200 items
Results 11 - 20 of 200 < previous next >