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Actress Halle Berry ‘done with love’ after latest break-up

Halle Berry doesn’t need a man and she has the Instagram story to prove it.

>> Read more trending news 

On Wednesday, the actress reportedly shared a photo on her Instagram story of a rope shaped like a heart and the words “done with love” along with three flexing muscle emojis. The post comes just hours after US Weeklyreported that she had split from her music producer boyfriend, Alex Da Kid.

Ahead of the split, Berry took a rather cryptic tone on Instagram. Sharing a photo of the back of her head, Berry wrote, “Grow out got me feelin’ some kinda way every day ain’t perfect…”

The actress has two children from previous relationships, Maceo, 3 and Nahla, 9. She was previously married to David Justice from 1992 to 1997, then wed Eric Benét in 2001 but the two split in 2005. She married Olivier Martinez in 2013 and the two finalized their divorce in 2016.

Tavis Smiley accuses PBS of ‘biased and sloppy’ investigation, denies any misconduct

Former PBS host Tavis Smiley is fighting back against sexual misconduct allegations, accusing PBS of a conducting a “biased and sloppy” investigation. 

>> Read more trending news 

The network suspended the “Tavis Smiley” show on Wednesday after former staffers accused the interviewer of inappropriate behavior.

According to Variety, the longtime PBS host had sexual relationships with many employees and was accused of “creating a verbally abusive and threatening environment” in the workplace. Some of the employees who accused the “Dancing with the Stars” alum were reportedly afraid to come forward sooner over fear of losing their job.

“PBS has indefinitely suspended distribution of ‘Tavis Smiley,’ produced by TS Media, an independent production company,” the network announced in a statement.

“PBS engaged an outside law firm to conduct an investigation immediately after learning of troubling allegations regarding Mr. Smiley. This investigation included interviews with witnesses as well as with Mr. Smiley. The inquiry uncovered multiple, credible allegations of conduct that is inconsistent with the values and standards of PBS, and the totality of this information led to today’s decision.”

>> Related: PBS suspends ‘Tavis Smiley’ show amid sexual misconduct investigation

Not only did Smiley deny the allegations, he said PBS didn’t even tell what the accusations were or who made them. 

“I have the utmost respect for women and celebrate the courage of those who have come forth to tell their truth. To be clear, I have never groped, coerced, or exposed myself inappropriately to any workplace colleague in my entire broadcast career, covering 6 networks over 30 years,” his statement said, in part. “Never. Ever. Never.”

Smiley said that after he threatened to file a lawsuit, the network agreed to hear his side of the story.

“If having a consensual relationship with a colleague years ago is the stuff that leads to this kind of public humiliation and personal destruction, heaven help us. The PBS investigators refused to review any of my personal documentation, refused to provide me the names of any accusers, refused to speak to my current staff, and refused to provide me any semblance of due process to defend myself against allegations from unknown sources. Their mind was made up. Almost immediately following the meeting, this story broke in Varietyas an ‘exclusive.’ Indeed, I learned more about these allegations reading the Variety story than the PBS investigator shared with me, the accused, in our 3 hour face to face meeting,” the statement continued.

>> Related: Lindsey Vonn opens up about backlash after her Trump-Olympics comments

Smiley stated that “PBS overreacted and conducted a biased and sloppy investigation, which led to a rush to judgement.”

Read his entire statement here.

Top 20 Global Concert Tours from Pollstar

The Top 20 Global Concert Tours ranks artists by average box office gross per city and includes the average ticket price for shows Worldwide. The list is based on data provided to the trade publication Pollstar by concert promoters and venue managers.

TOP 20 GLOBAL CONCERT TOURS

1. The Rolling Stones ; $9,996,473; $158.81.

2. U2; $8,355,366; $117.39.

3. Coldplay; $4,373,643; $108.05.

4. Lady Gaga; $2,838,540; $117.65.

5. Bruno Mars; $2,674,096; $111.65.

6. Guns N' Roses; $2,575,272; $118.75.

7. Roger Waters; $2,298,860; $117.98.

8. Dead & Company; $1,667,123; $111.11.

9. Ed Sheeran; $1,441,881; $85.05.

10. Ariana Grande; $1,401,503; $90.29.

11. Depeche Mode; $1,372,431; $87.90.

12. Neil Diamond; $1,370,818; $113.35.

13. Marc Anthony; $1,224,459; $100.77.

14. The Weeknd; $1,098,035; $85.18.

15. Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band; $1,084,704; $89.82.

16. Tim McGraw / Faith Hill; $1,050,287; $83.27.

17. Florida Georgia Line; $1,005,776; $51.75.

18. Foo Fighters; $1,001,748; $92.06.

19. Luke Bryan; $964,321; $50.71.

20. Kendrick Lamar; $960,444; $80.70.

For free upcoming tour information, go to www.pollstar.com

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Walt Disney presents: ‘Avatar,’ ‘The Simpsons,’ ‘Alien’ and ‘Rocky Horror’

As of Thursday morning, the Walt Disney Co. is set to own a large part of the Murdoch family's 21st Century Fox in a $52.4 billion deal. With this merger, the number of major studios in Hollywood will go from six to five, and the combined Disney and Fox assets would have a 39% theatrical market share, according to Variety

>> Read more trending news 

The deal, which some have said will raise red flags among antitrust officials, is still awaiting regulatory approval, which could take anywhere from 12 to 18 months, according to Variety.

This deal is sort of the opposite of the Paramount Case of 1948, when RKO Pictures shuttered, divorcing movie theaters from the ownership of the studios that created the films those theaters were screening

A merger is a wish your boardroom makes, and all that. 

(In other news, the FCC is expected to repeal net neutrality Thursday, so...more great news for big corporations.)

>> Related: MoviePass now officially has some Texas competition 

Most of the chatter around this deal has centered around two things: one is that Disney is becoming a monopoly. Disney already owns Pixar, Marvel and The Studio Formerly Known As Lucasfilm. Disney’s acquiring of Fox isn’t just another merger deal — it’s one of the biggest deals to go down in Hollywood history.

The other talking point is that, well, hey, now that Disney owns Fox properties, that means that a majority of the Marvel properties are now in Disney’s hands. 

This means — as many have pointed out on Twitter — that the X-Men can now theoretically be in “Avengers: Infinity War” and other Marvel films. Ditto Deadpool and the Fantastic Four.

>> Related: Pixar celebrates Day of the Dead, family ties with captivating ‘Coco’

But there’s some other properties that Disney has now acquired that don’t really fit the House of Mouse’s squeaky clean image. Read on to see some of what might be coming to a theater near you under a new Disney banner. 

Comic books

  • X-Men
  • Deadpool
  • Fantastic Four
  • Legion
  • “Kingsman”

All of the above films and characters are either super violent or not very Disney-like, something that “Deadpool” star Ryan Reynolds pointed out on Twitter last week.

The other fun thing to think about here: What if Disney made an Avengers film with Captain America and the Fantastic Four? Chris Evans plays Captain America and also played The Human Torch in Fox’s 2005 bid to make that live-action franchise happen. (If you really want to check out something special, peep this unreleased “Fantastic Four” that Fox made back in 1994 solely to keep the rights to the franchise.)

>> Related: How comic book movies are making comic books worse

Action franchises

  • “Alien”
  • “Avatar”
  • “Die Hard”
  • “Independence Day”
  • “Planet of the Apes”
  • “Predator”

Ho, ho, ho. Now I have a lot of R-rated franchises. Does this mean we’re going to see a “Yippee-ki-yay, Mr. Falcon!” PG-13-ification of some of film’s most enduring action franchises? 

>> Related: ‘The Holiday' is a better Christmas movie than 'Love Actually' and here's why

But, on another note, Disney now owns the “Avatar” franchise, which is reported to have four planned sequels. The first film, released in 2009, brought in almost $3 BILLION worldwide.

Kid’s franchises

  • “Alvin and the Chipmunks”
  • “Doctor Doolittle”
  • “Goosebumps”
  • “Home Alone”
  • “Ice Age”
  • “Night at the Museum”
  • “Rio”

All of these franchises are at least three films in, with the exception of “Goosebumps.” Expect more from the House of Mouse in the coming years.

Straight-up weird properties to now think of as ‘Disney’ properties

  • “Cocoon”
  • “M*A*S*H” (Robert Altman film and the Fox TV series)
  • “The Omen” franchise
  • “Rocky Horror Picture Show”
  • “Romancing the Stone”
  • “The Sound of Music”
  • “X-Files” franchise

All that needs to be said:

Read more here.

Pink joins list of stars performing during Super Bowl week

Pink is joining the list of stars performing in Minneapolis during Super Bowl week.

The singer will perform Friday, Feb. 2, at Nomadic Live! in the refurbished Minneapolis Armory building.

Imagine Dragons will headline the EA Sports Bowl on Thursday, Feb. 1, at the Armory. Jennifer Lopez will also perform in the building near U.S. Bank Stadium on Saturday, Feb. 3.

Super Bowl week will be packed with entertainment. Performers at various venues include The Chainsmokers, Florida Georgia Line and the Dave Matthews Band. A 10-day free concert series features a "Prince night" and local acts such as Soul Asylum and Mint Condition.

Gwen Stefani will close out the week on Sunday, Feb. 4, at Club Nomadic at Mystic Lake Casino Hotel.

___

More AP NFL: http://pro32.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL

Salma Hayek calls Harvey Weinstein ‘a monster’ in New York Times piece

Salma Hayek has come forward with allegations of sexual misconduct against film producer Harvey Weinstein.

In a first-person story written for The New York Times, the actress describes Weinstein as “a passionate cinephile, a risk taker, a patron of talent in film, a loving father and a monster.”

>> Read more trending news 

Hayek, who previously said she was bullied by Weinstein in the wake of initial public sexual misconduct and rape allegations against the producer, is sharing details of sexual harassment on the set of the 2002 movie “Frida,” about the life of famed Mexican painter Frida Kahlo.

Hayek said that she knew little of Weinstein and what she did know was from her relationship with director Robert Rodriguez and his then-wife, producer Elizabeth Avellan.

Related: 3 women accuse Harvey Weinstein of rape, report says

“All I knew of Harvey at the time was that he had a remarkable intellect, he was a loyal friend and a family man,” she wrote.

“Knowing what I know now, I wonder if it wasn’t my friendship with them — and Quentin Tarantino and George Clooney — that saved me from being raped.”

Hayek was initially set to work on the movie about the artist with a different company, but said she fought to get the movie back and work with Weinstein on it.

Eventually, she said she turned down multiple advances from Weinstein. Hayek said he showed up unexpectedly at numerous locations and different hotels, asked her to take a shower with him, let him watch her shower, give her a massage and get naked with another woman, among other advances.

“And with every refusal came Harvey’s Machiavellian rage,” Hayek said.

“The range of his persuasion tactics went from sweet-talking me to that one time when, in an attack of fury, he said the terrifying words, ‘I will kill you, don’t think I can’t,’” Hayek said. 

According to the actress, those refusals led Weinstein to offer the role and the script Hayek worked on for years to someone else.

“At that point, I had to resort to using lawyers, not by pursuing a sexual harassment case, but by claiming “bad faith,” as I had worked so hard on a movie that he was not intending to make or sell back to me,” she said. “I tried to get it out of his company.”

Related: Ashley Judd accuses Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment

Hayek said once she was able to retain involvement in the film, she was told the only way people would be interested in it with her as the star is with an element of sex. 

“The only thing he noticed was that I was not sexy in the movie. He made me doubt if I was any good as an actress, but he never succeeded in making me think that the film was not worth making,” she said.

“He offered me one option to continue. He would let me finish the film if I agreed to do a sex scene with another woman. And he demanded full-frontal nudity.”

USA Today reported that Weinstein responded to Hayek with a statement through his spokeswoman Holly Baird.

“Mr. Weinstein regards Salma Hayek as a first-class actress and cast her in several of his movies, among them ‘Once Upon a Time in Mexico,’ ‘Dogma,’ and ‘Studio 54.’ He was very proud of her Best Actress Academy Award nomination for ‘Frida’ and continues to support her work. “While Jennifer Lopez was interested in playing Frida and at the time was a bigger star, Mr. Weinstein overruled other investors to back Salma as the lead. Miramax put up half of the money and all of the P&A; the budget was over 12 million. As in most collaborative projects, there was creative friction on ‘Frida,’ but it served to drive the project to perfection. The movie opened in multiple theaters and was supported by a huge advertising campaign and an enormous Academy Awards budget. “Mr. Weinstein does not recall pressuring Salma to do a gratuitous sex scene with a female costar and he was not there for the filming. However, that was part of the story, as Frida Kahlo was bisexual and the more significant sex scene in the movie was choreographed by Ms. Hayek with Geoffrey Rush. The original uni-brow used was an issue because it diverted attention from the performances. All of the sexual allegations as portrayed by Salma are not accurate and others who witnessed the events have a different account of what transpired. “Ed Norton, who was Ms. Hayek’s boyfriend at the time, (worked with Mr. Weinstein on the rewrite of the script in Mexico) did a brilliant job of rewriting the script and Mr. Weinstein battled the WGA to get him a credit on the film. His effort was unsuccessful to everyone’s disappointment. “By Mr. Weinstein’s own admission, his boorish behavior following a screening of ‘Frida’ was prompted by his disappointment in the cut of the movie—and a reason he took a firm hand in the final edit, alongside the very skilled director Julie Taymor.”

Simmons says he will 'defend' himself following rape claims

Music mogul Russell Simmons said on Instagram that he plans to defend himself a day after a New York Times story published claims by three women saying he raped them.

The allegations in the Times' Wednesday report stem from the 1980s and 1990s. Simmons denied the allegations Wednesday and again on Thursday.

"Today, I begin to properly defend myself. I will prove without any doubt that I am innocent of all rape charges," Simmons wrote Thursday on Instagram.

Simmons posted his words under a photo that read #NotMe, explaining that he isn't trying to go against the anti-harassment movement #MeToo, where millions have shared their stories about being sexually harassed and assaulted.

"My intention is not to diminish the #MeToo movement in any way, but instead hold my accusers accountable," he wrote. "Again, this is not a movement against or even in conjunction with #MeToo. It's just a statement about my innocence."

Also on Thursday, the New York Police Department confirmed that it is investigating the rape claims and are reaching out to the alleged victims.

"Our detectives are in the process of reviewing that information," Deputy Chief Timothy Trainor said in a statement.

The allegations in the Times story weren't the first to hit Simmons. Model Keri Claussen Khalighi said Simmons coerced her to perform a sex act and later penetrated her without her consent in 1991. Simmons said the sex with Klalighi was consensual.

"Today, I will focus on 'The Original Sin' (Keri Claussen), the claim that created this insane pile," Simmons wrote on Instagram. "Stay tuned! We'll share information today."

He also said "and tomorrow the case of Jenny Lumet," referring to the screenwriter who said Simmons had sex with her more than two decades ago despite her repeated demands that he stop. Simmons said he had a different memory of the night but apologized. Following Lumet's claims, HBO said it would edit out any link to Simmons in its "All Def Comedy" show.

Simmons founded Def Jam Recordings with mega-producer Rick Rubin in 1984. It made stars of such hip-hop artists as LL Cool J, Slick Rick, The Beastie Boys and Public Enemy.

Scott M. Mills to become new BET president

Black Entertainment Television will soon have a new president.

BET Networks announced Thursday that Scott M. Mills will take over as president, effective Jan. 1. He succeeds Debra L. Lee, who will remain as chair and CEO. Most recently, Mills was executive vice president and chief administrative officer at Viacom, BET's parent company.

He says in a statement that he looks forward to overseeing "exciting, thought-provoking" programs for African Americans and young people worldwide. Lee had served as president since 2005, when she succeeded BET founder Robert L. Johnson.

BET is known for a wide range of programming, from the comedy series "50 Central" to the Soul Train Awards.

The Latest: Walmart suspends ties to Tavis Smiley show, tour

The Latest on allegations of sexual misconduct against Tavis Smiley (all times local):

4:20 p.m.

Walmart is suspending its relationship with talk show host Tavis Smiley.

The retail giant says it is "troubled by the recent allegations" facing the TV, radio and book star.

The move comes a day after PBS indefinitely suspended distribution of Smiley's talk show after an independent investigation uncovered "multiple, credible allegations" of sexual misconduct by its host.

Smiley responded that he has never harassed anyone and claimed one relationship the network uncovered was consensual.

Walmart had been a sponsor of Smiley's show and an upcoming touring theatrical show. It says it will be "suspending our relationship with Mr. Smiley, pending the outcome of the PBS investigation."

___

12:15 p.m.

Talk show host Tavis Smiley says PBS "overreacted" when it indefinitely suspended his show after an independent investigation uncovered "multiple, credible allegations" of misconduct by its host.

In a Facebook post, Smiley says he has never harassed anyone and claimed one relationship the network uncovered was consensual.

Smiley also claims PBS "refused to provide me the names of any accusers, refused to speak to my current staff, and refused to provide me any semblance of due process to defend myself against allegations from unknown sources."

His show's page at PBS was scrubbed on Thursday

Smiley has a development deal with Warner Bros. Television and was working with J.J. Abrams to turn his new book about Michael Jackson's last days and death into a limited TV series. Next month he is expected to launch a nationwide 40-city tour of a theatrical production focusing on the last year of Martin Luther King Jr.'s life. "Death of a King: A Live Theatrical Experience" is based on Smiley's 2014 book of the same title and was to start Jan. 15, King's birthday.

___

1 a.m.

PBS says it has indefinitely suspended distribution of Tavis Smiley's talk show after an independent investigation uncovered "multiple, credible allegations" of misconduct by its host.

PBS said Wednesday it had engaged an outside law firm to investigate "troubling allegations" against the host, it said in a statement.

"This investigation included interviews with witnesses as well as with Mr. Smiley," the statement said. "The inquiry uncovered multiple, credible allegations of conduct that is inconsistent with the values and standards of PBS, and the totality of this information led to today's decision."

A representative for PBS declined to specify the nature of the allegations against Smiley.

His nightly program has aired on PBS since 2004.

Representatives for Smiley did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Retiring New York Times publisher to be replaced by his son

The publisher of The New York Times Co. is stepping down after 25 years and will be succeeded by his 37-year-old son, the Times announced Thursday.

Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr. will retire as of Dec. 31 but will remain as chairman of the board of directors, the Times said. His son and current deputy publisher, Arthur Gregg Sulzberger, will take over as publisher.

"It is the greatest honor to serve The Times — and the people who make it what it is — as the next publisher," the younger Sulzberger, known as A.G., said in a staffwide email.

Sulzberger praised his father as "the only publisher of his generation who took the reins of a great news organization and left it even better than he found."

A.G. Sulzberger will be the fifth generation of the Ochs-Sulzberger family to serve as publisher since Adolph Ochs, his great great-grandfather, bought the Times in 1896.

The outgoing publisher, who is 66, took over from his own father, Arthur O. Sulzberger, in 1992 and went on to preside during an era of rapid change brought on by the rise of digital media.

The Times published its first color photo in 1993 and its first web edition in 1996.

The newspaper's 2011 move to charge online readers through a pay wall was watched closely, with some doubting consumers would pay for content they were used to getting for free. The Times now has 3.5 million subscribers, 2.5 million of them paying for digital-only content.

"It has been an extraordinary honor to serve as publisher of The New York Times and I will step down at the end of the year prouder than I have ever been of the strength, independence and integrity of this institution," Sulzberger said in a statement.

The Times won 60 Pulitzer Prizes during Sulzberger's leadership but weathered controversies including a 2003 plagiarism scandal involving reporter Jayson Blair and the 2014 firing of Jill Abramson, the paper's first female executive editor.

The younger Sulzberger headed a team that produced a 2014 "innovation report" that outlined strategies for adapting to the digital era.

The Times has set a goal of bringing in at least $800 million in digital revenue by 2020, double what the company earned in 2014.

The younger Sulzberger joined the Times in 2009 after working as a reporter at the Providence Journal and the Oregonian. He worked as a New York metro reporter and later as the head of the Times' Kansas City bureau, where he wrote about his struggle to survive as a vegetarian in a "Mecca of meat."

After Kansas City, he became an assistant editor and was appointed deputy publisher last year.

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