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Yale professor's guide to resisting tyranny coming next week

A Yale University history professor's suggestions for resisting Donald Trump's presidency and his warnings about the demise of democracy, a list widely shared on social media, have been expanded into a book.

Timothy Snyder's "On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century" will be published next Tuesday, according to the Penguin Random House imprint Tim Duggan Books. "Tyranny" is based on a Facebook posting by Snyder that he wrote after the election last November.

Snyder's advice ranges from "Do not obey in advance" to "Learn from others in other countries." He is a specialist in European history. His other books include "Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin" and "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning."

Yale professor's guide to resisting tyranny coming next week

A Yale University history professor's suggestions for resisting Donald Trump's presidency and his warnings about the demise of democracy, a list widely shared on social media, have been expanded into a book.

Timothy Snyder's "On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century" will be published next Tuesday, according to the Penguin Random House imprint Tim Duggan Books. "Tyranny" is based on a Facebook posting by Snyder that he wrote after the election last November.

Snyder's advice ranges from "Do not obey in advance" to "Learn from others in other countries." He is a specialist in European history. His other books include "Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin" and "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning."

Matt Reeves steps in to direct 'The Batman'

"Cloverfield" director Matt Reeves has stepped in to direct "The Batman" for Warner Bros. just a few weeks after star Ben Affleck left the post. Warner Bros. said Thursday that Reeves would also produce the stand-alone film.

Reeves, also known for directing "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes," said he's loved the Batman story since he was a child and is honored and excited to "bring an epic and emotional new take on the Caped Crusader to the big screen."

Affleck, who is also writing the screenplay, dropped out of directing the project in late January citing the focus required to play the superhero. He'll appear next as Batman in "Justice League" which comes out in November.

There is no release date set for "The Batman."

Matt Reeves steps in to direct 'The Batman'

"Cloverfield" director Matt Reeves has stepped in to direct "The Batman" for Warner Bros. just a few weeks after star Ben Affleck left the post. Warner Bros. said Thursday that Reeves would also produce the stand-alone film.

Reeves, also known for directing "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes," said he's loved the Batman story since he was a child and is honored and excited to "bring an epic and emotional new take on the Caped Crusader to the big screen."

Affleck, who is also writing the screenplay, dropped out of directing the project in late January citing the focus required to play the superhero. He'll appear next as Batman in "Justice League" which comes out in November.

There is no release date set for "The Batman."

APNewsBreak: Beyonce out of Coachella; will perform in 2018

Beyonce, who is pregnant with twins, will not perform at Coachella this year, but will headline the festival in 2018.

In a statement to The Associated Press on Thursday, Beyonce's Parkwood Entertainment and festival producer Goldenvoice said the pop star had to pull out of the famed festival under doctor's orders.

"Following the advice of her doctors to keep a less rigorous schedule in the coming months, Beyonce has made the decision to forgo performing at the 2017 Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival," the statement said. "However, Goldenvoice and Parkwood are pleased to confirm that she will be a headliner at the 2018 festival. Thank you for your understanding."

It was not clear who will perform in her absence. Radiohead and Kendrick Lamar will also headline the two-weekend festival in Indio, California. Radiohead will perform on April 14 and 21, and Lamar on April 16 and 23.

Beyonce was originally set to perform April 15 and 22. It would have marked her first time she performed at the festival, and she would have been the first female act to headline Coachella since Bjork in 2007.

Beyonce, who last appeared at Coachella in 2014 when she danced onstage during her sister Solange's set, announced last month that she and Jay Z are expecting twins. It is not clear when Beyonce is due to give birth. Earlier this month, the pregnant singer performed at the Grammy Awards, where she won two honors for her genre-bending album, "Lemonade."

Jay Z, 47, and Beyonce, 35, are the parents of Blue Ivy, who was born in 2012.

Other performers at this year's Coachella include Lorde, the xx, Bon Iver, Future, Gucci Mane, Justice, DJ Snake, DJ Khaled and Father John Misty.

____

Online:

http://www.beyonce.com/

https://www.coachella.com/

APNewsBreak: Beyonce out of Coachella; will perform in 2018

Beyonce, who is pregnant with twins, will not perform at Coachella this year, but will headline the festival in 2018.

In a statement to The Associated Press on Thursday, Beyonce's Parkwood Entertainment and festival producer Goldenvoice said the pop star had to pull out of the famed festival under doctor's orders.

"Following the advice of her doctors to keep a less rigorous schedule in the coming months, Beyonce has made the decision to forgo performing at the 2017 Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival," the statement said. "However, Goldenvoice and Parkwood are pleased to confirm that she will be a headliner at the 2018 festival. Thank you for your understanding."

It was not clear who will perform in her absence. Radiohead and Kendrick Lamar will also headline the two-weekend festival in Indio, California. Radiohead will perform on April 14 and 21, and Lamar on April 16 and 23.

Beyonce was originally set to perform April 15 and 22. It would have marked her first time she performed at the festival, and she would have been the first female act to headline Coachella since Bjork in 2007.

Beyonce, who last appeared at Coachella in 2014 when she danced onstage during her sister Solange's set, announced last month that she and Jay Z are expecting twins. It is not clear when Beyonce is due to give birth. Earlier this month, the pregnant singer performed at the Grammy Awards, where she won two honors for her genre-bending album, "Lemonade."

Jay Z, 47, and Beyonce, 35, are the parents of Blue Ivy, who was born in 2012.

Other performers at this year's Coachella include Lorde, the xx, Bon Iver, Future, Gucci Mane, Justice, DJ Snake, DJ Khaled and Father John Misty.

____

Online:

http://www.beyonce.com/

https://www.coachella.com/

Robin Thicke's ex-wife accuses him of evidence tampering

Attorneys for Robin Thicke's ex-wife in a court filing made public Thursday accused the singer of tampering with a court order.

The documents by attorneys for Paula Patton filed this week accuse Thicke of altering a custody court order and attempting to get her arrested in front of their 6-year-old son during a bitter custody dispute.

The filing became public a day before a trial is scheduled to begin in Patton's efforts to obtain a five-year restraining order against the "Blurred Lines" singer.

Patton has accused Thicke of being physically abusive to her during their marriage, and severely spanking their son.

In late January, she obtained a temporary restraining order requiring Thicke to stay away from her and have only supervised visits with their son.

Thicke has denied he has abused his son and his former attorney has said there was no basis for Patton's domestic violence allegations and called them retaliatory. Phone and email messages left seeking comment from one of Thicke's current attorneys, Angela Pierce DiDonato, were not immediately returned.

Patton contends the singer's alleged alteration of a court custody order and attempts to get her arrested are part of an effort to harass, intimidate and cause her emotional distress and constitute domestic violence.

"Mr. Thicke's egregious, premeditated and unlawful domestic violence has terrorized" Patton and their son, the court documents said.

Patton's attorneys said the restraining order trial could include as many as 26 witnesses and last 15 days or more.

Her filing also accuses Thicke of trying to manipulate a child services investigation by taking a case worker out to an expensive sushi dinner while the case was active. A message seeking comment from the Department of Children and Family Services was not immediately returned.

Patton was granted sole custody of the boy on Jan. 26 and a judge ordered Thicke to stay away from his ex-wife and her home.

To obtain the temporary restraining order, Patton included a sworn declaration alleging Thicke was abusive during their marriage and pushed her to the ground and kicked her during a fight in April 2013. S

he also cited a Jan. 19 incident in which she stated Thicke showed up at her mother's house while their son was being interviewed by child services workers and then refused to leave. After the child services workers left, Thicke banged on the door and demanded to see his son, leaving only after Patton's mother called police, Patton wrote.

Thicke's lawyers have said in court filings that the singer was cleared of any wrongdoing.

Thicke's former attorney, Larry Ginsberg, accused Patton of manipulating her son to gain full custody. Ginsberg and his law firm were disqualified from working for Thicke on Tuesday because a new lawyer in his firm once worked for lawyers representing Patton and may have learned inside information about the case.

The legal fighting between Thicke and Patton began weeks after the singer's father, "Growing Pains" actor Alan Thicke, died in December.

Thicke, whose biggest hit was the 2013 song "Blurred Lines," and Patton dated for 10 years before marrying in June 2005. She filed for divorce in October 2014, and their judgment was finalized a few months later.

___

Anthony McCartney can be reached at http://twitter.com/mccartneyAP

Robin Thicke's ex-wife accuses him of evidence tampering

Attorneys for Robin Thicke's ex-wife in a court filing made public Thursday accused the singer of tampering with a court order.

The documents by attorneys for Paula Patton filed this week accuse Thicke of altering a custody court order and attempting to get her arrested in front of their 6-year-old son during a bitter custody dispute.

The filing became public a day before a trial is scheduled to begin in Patton's efforts to obtain a five-year restraining order against the "Blurred Lines" singer.

Patton has accused Thicke of being physically abusive to her during their marriage, and severely spanking their son.

In late January, she obtained a temporary restraining order requiring Thicke to stay away from her and have only supervised visits with their son.

Thicke has denied he has abused his son and his former attorney has said there was no basis for Patton's domestic violence allegations and called them retaliatory. Phone and email messages left seeking comment from one of Thicke's current attorneys, Angela Pierce DiDonato, were not immediately returned.

Patton contends the singer's alleged alteration of a court custody order and attempts to get her arrested are part of an effort to harass, intimidate and cause her emotional distress and constitute domestic violence.

"Mr. Thicke's egregious, premeditated and unlawful domestic violence has terrorized" Patton and their son, the court documents said.

Patton's attorneys said the restraining order trial could include as many as 26 witnesses and last 15 days or more.

Her filing also accuses Thicke of trying to manipulate a child services investigation by taking a case worker out to an expensive sushi dinner while the case was active. A message seeking comment from the Department of Children and Family Services was not immediately returned.

Patton was granted sole custody of the boy on Jan. 26 and a judge ordered Thicke to stay away from his ex-wife and her home.

To obtain the temporary restraining order, Patton included a sworn declaration alleging Thicke was abusive during their marriage and pushed her to the ground and kicked her during a fight in April 2013. S

he also cited a Jan. 19 incident in which she stated Thicke showed up at her mother's house while their son was being interviewed by child services workers and then refused to leave. After the child services workers left, Thicke banged on the door and demanded to see his son, leaving only after Patton's mother called police, Patton wrote.

Thicke's lawyers have said in court filings that the singer was cleared of any wrongdoing.

Thicke's former attorney, Larry Ginsberg, accused Patton of manipulating her son to gain full custody. Ginsberg and his law firm were disqualified from working for Thicke on Tuesday because a new lawyer in his firm once worked for lawyers representing Patton and may have learned inside information about the case.

The legal fighting between Thicke and Patton began weeks after the singer's father, "Growing Pains" actor Alan Thicke, died in December.

Thicke, whose biggest hit was the 2013 song "Blurred Lines," and Patton dated for 10 years before marrying in June 2005. She filed for divorce in October 2014, and their judgment was finalized a few months later.

___

Anthony McCartney can be reached at http://twitter.com/mccartneyAP

Fritz Koenig, sculptor whose art withstood 9/11 attack, dies

Fritz Koenig, a German sculptor whose work "The Sphere" became a symbol of resilience after the 9/11 attacks in New York, has died. He was 92.

Koenig, a well-known artist thanks to his distinctive large statues and sculptures, created the ball-shaped bronze over a four-year period starting in 1967.

Originally called "Grosse Kugelkaryatide N.Y.," the 25-foot- (7.7 meter) -high sculpture stood at the foot of the World Trade Center from 1971 until Sept. 11, 2001, when al-Qaida hijackers flew airliners into the twin towers.

It was recovered from the rubble — heavily dented but structurally intact — and was moved to Battery Park, where it now stands alongside an eternal flame dedicated to the people who died. A plaque notes that the sculpture was conceived as a symbol of world peace.

Koenig said it was a miracle that "The Sphere" had survived, noting at the time: "It was a sculpture, now it's a memorial."

The artist was born in the Bavarian city of Wuerzburg in 1924. After serving in the German army during World War II, Koenig studied at the Munich Academy of Fine Art. He participated in the 1958 Venice Biennale and had his first show in the United States at New York's Staempfli Gallery in 1961.

After the 1972 attack on the Munich Olympics, Koenig created a granite beam to commemorate the 11 Israeli team members and a German police officer who were killed. Another of his works stands prominently as a memorial to the people murdered by the Nazis at the former Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria.

Many of his pieces can be found at the Sculpture Museum in Landsberg .

The dpa news agency reported that Koenig died late Wednesday at his home in Altdorf, about 50 kilometers (31 miles) northeast of Munich. His death was confirmed Thursday by Bavaria state's Ministry of Culture.

Fritz Koenig, sculptor whose art withstood 9/11 attack, dies

Fritz Koenig, a German sculptor whose work "The Sphere" became a symbol of resilience after the 9/11 attacks in New York, has died. He was 92.

Koenig, a well-known artist thanks to his distinctive large statues and sculptures, created the ball-shaped bronze over a four-year period starting in 1967.

Originally called "Grosse Kugelkaryatide N.Y.," the 25-foot- (7.7 meter) -high sculpture stood at the foot of the World Trade Center from 1971 until Sept. 11, 2001, when al-Qaida hijackers flew airliners into the twin towers.

It was recovered from the rubble — heavily dented but structurally intact — and was moved to Battery Park, where it now stands alongside an eternal flame dedicated to the people who died. A plaque notes that the sculpture was conceived as a symbol of world peace.

Koenig said it was a miracle that "The Sphere" had survived, noting at the time: "It was a sculpture, now it's a memorial."

The artist was born in the Bavarian city of Wuerzburg in 1924. After serving in the German army during World War II, Koenig studied at the Munich Academy of Fine Art. He participated in the 1958 Venice Biennale and had his first show in the United States at New York's Staempfli Gallery in 1961.

After the 1972 attack on the Munich Olympics, Koenig created a granite beam to commemorate the 11 Israeli team members and a German police officer who were killed. Another of his works stands prominently as a memorial to the people murdered by the Nazis at the former Mauthausen concentration camp in Austria.

Many of his pieces can be found at the Sculpture Museum in Landsberg .

The dpa news agency reported that Koenig died late Wednesday at his home in Altdorf, about 50 kilometers (31 miles) northeast of Munich. His death was confirmed Thursday by Bavaria state's Ministry of Culture.

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