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5 jurors picked for Cosby trial, 2 know a sex assault victim

The search for 12 jurors and six alternates for Bill Cosby's sexual assault trial is off to a brisk start even though a third of the initial jury pool had an opinion about Cosby's guilt or innocence and an equal number said they or someone close to them had been sexually assaulted.

Three men and two women, all white, were selected Monday. The lawyers studied each person's race, sex, age, occupation and interests to try to guess their inherent sympathies, experts said. Cosby, in an interview last week, said he thinks race "could be" a motivating factor in the accusations against him.

"You're looking for what people already believe," said University of Pittsburgh School of Law professor David Harris. "People don't take in new information and process it. They filter it into what they already know and think."

The actor-comedian once known as America's Dad for his portrayal of Dr. Cliff Huxtable on "The Cosby Show" is charged with drugging and molesting a Temple University women's basketball team manager at his home near Philadelphia in 2004. He has called the encounter consensual.

Dozens of other women have made similar accusations against Cosby, 79, but Judge Steven T. O'Neill is allowing only one of them to testify at the June 5 trial in suburban Philadelphia. The jury from Pittsburgh will be sequestered nearly 300 miles from home.

The jurors' names, ages and occupations were being kept private. Two of the men selected said they or someone close to them had been sexually assaulted, but they insisted they could judge the case fairly. Sometimes that is not so easy, one law professor said.

"It's one thing to set aside intellectually what you know, but it's another to set it aside emotionally," said Laurie Levenson, a Loyola Law School professor.

The case against Cosby has attracted worldwide publicity that the judge hopes to shield from jurors during the trial.

Cosby came to court on the arm of an aide, carrying a box of tissues, and frequently conferred with his three lawyers at the defense table. Lead defense lawyer Brian McMonagle said his client was eager to get the process started. Cosby has said he does not expect to testify.

The trial will take place in Norristown in Montgomery County, where Cosby had invited Andrea Constand to his home in 2004. Constand said she went seeking career advice. She said Cosby gave her wine and pills that put her in a stupor before molesting her on his couch.

Constand was 30 and dating a woman at the time, while Cosby was 66 and long married to wife Camille. Cosby in sworn testimony has said he put his hand down Constand's pants, but said she did not protest.

The Associated Press does not typically identify people who say they are the victims of sexual assault unless they come forward, as Constand has done.

The first group of 100 potential jurors summoned Monday included 16 people of color. Forty-one of them will return Tuesday for further questioning. The judge will bring in more people as needed.

Cosby was arrested Dec. 30, 2015, days before the 12-year statute of limitations expired. He has pleaded not guilty and remains free on $1 million bail.

He told a talk show host last week that he hopes to beat back the charges and resume his career.

"I want to get back to the laughter and the enjoyment of things that I've written and things that I perform on stage."

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Dale reported from Philadelphia.

Much-anticipated Ariana Grande concert ends in blood, horror

A highly anticipated night for Ariana Grande fans ended in blood and terror after an explosion tore through the foyer of the Manchester Arena.

At least 19 concertgoers were killed and about 50 others were injured Monday night.

Shaun Hunter was with his daughters — Eva, 10, and Ruby, 12 — all wearing kitten ears like the star of the show when the house lights went on. He called the rush of concertgoers after the explosion "a stampede."

"I saw one bloke carrying his daughter. She was bleeding," Hunter told The Times of London.

Police said they were treating the incident as terrorism.

Grande, who had just left the stage, was unhurt.

Social media carried messages from families concerned about missing loved ones.

Ellie Ward, 17, made his way out of the arena after the blast, and found his 64-year-old grandfather, who had been waiting for him when the explosion happened.

"He said he only realized what had happened when he felt the side of his head and it was bleeding," the younger Ward told The Guardian newspaper.

"He's OK but he's cut his cheek," she said. "They said he had severed an artery. A lot of glass shattered on him."

"Everyone was screaming and running," Robert Tempkin, 22, told The Times. "There were coats and people's phones on the floor. People just dropped everything."

Elena Semino and her husband were waiting by the arena ticket office for her daughter when the explosion went off.

"My husband and I were standing against the wall, luckily, and all of a sudden there was this thing," she told The Guardian. "I can't even describe it. There was this heat on my neck and when I looked up there were bodies everywhere."

Despite wounds to her neck and a leg, Semino dashed into the auditorium in search of her daughter while her husband, who had only a minor injury, stayed behind to help an injured woman. She found her daughter Natalie, 17, and her friends safe.

The Latest: Australian leader condemns Manchester blast

The Latest on an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, that authorities say killed several people. (all times local):

5:45 a.m.

Australia's prime minister has told the Australian Parliament that the deadly explosion at Manchester Arena appeared to be a "brutal attack on young people everywhere."

Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said on Wednesday the British were treating the blast that killed at least 19 people and injured more than 50 as a terrorist attack, although its cause was unknown.

Turnbull says: "This incident, this attack, is especially vile, especially criminal, especially horrific because it appears to have been deliberately directed at teenagers."

He added: "This is an attack on innocents. Surely there is no crime more reprehensible than the murder of children. This is a direct and brutal attack on young people everywhere, on freedom everywhere."

He says Australian diplomats were working to discover if any victim was Australian.

In Tokyo, a spokesman for the Japanese government condemned the attack.

Yoshihide Suga, the government's chief cabinet secretary, says: "If this is a terrorist attack, such abhorrent acts of terrorism cannot be justified for any reason, and Japan firmly condemns such an act of terrorism. I would like to express my heartfelt condolences to the victims and families of the deceased and my prayers to a swift recovery for the wounded. Japan stands in solidarity with the people of the U.K."

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4:00 a.m.

Campaigning has been suspended in Britain's national election after a deadly explosion at Manchester Arena.

Prime Minister Theresa May canceled campaign events Tuesday after the blast, which killed at least 19 people and injured more than 50. She is due to chair a meeting of the government's emergency committee, COBRA, later.

Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron cancelled a campaign tour to Gibraltar after the explosion, which police say they are treating as a terrorist attack.

Britons are due to go to the polls on June 8.

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3:45 a.m.

A number of Manchester taxi services say they are offering free rides to people trapped by the incident.

The taxi companies posted messages about the free rides on Twitter after an explosion at Manchester Arena after an Ariana Grande concert Monday night. The blast killed 19 people and injured dozens more.

The service could also be used by people trying to get to local hospitals to look for loved ones.

In addition some city residents opened their homes to provide overnight lodging for people who were stranded by the shutdown in some train services because of the incident.

City officials said the true spirit of Manchester was surfacing in the hours after the incident.

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3:35 a.m.

The Department of Homeland Security says there is no evidence of credible threats against music venues in the U.S., as England reels from an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert late Monday.

The department says the U.S. public may experience increased security in and around public places and events.

DHS says it is closely monitoring the situation at Manchester Arena and working with U.K. officials to obtain additional information about the cause of the explosion.

The government is urging U.S. citizens in Manchester to heed directions from local authorities and be vigilant about their security.

The explosion killed at least 19 people and injured dozens. Police say they are treating as a terrorist attack.

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3:20 a.m.

Frantic loved ones of young people missing after an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert have taken to Twitter and Instagram with their photos and pleas for help.

Many Manchester residents responded early Tuesday with offers of shelter and details on locations where displaced concert-goers had been taken in.

The 23-year-old Grande, true to her youthful fan base, is a social media phenomenon with 105 million followers on Instagram and 45.6 million followers on Twitter. Her fans, proud "Arianators," were among those who took to Twitter with prayers and tears.

Fellow stars offered condolences as well.

Taylor Swift tweeted, "My thoughts, prayers and tears for all those affected by the Manchester tragedy tonight. I'm sending all my love."

Ellie Goulding, Cher (fresh from a big night at the Billboard Awards) and Katy Perry were among others to tweet their support.

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3 a.m.

Greater Manchester Police say they are working with national police and intelligence agencies in what is being treated as a terrorist incident.

Police said Tuesday morning they are still gathering information about the incident and are setting up a telephone hot line to help people locate loved ones. Police said there are 19 confirmed deaths.

Authorities are also asking the public to stay away from the area around Manchester Arena where an explosion disrupted a crowded pop concert by American artist Ariana Grande.

The British government is planning an emergency Cabinet meeting for later Monday morning.

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2:45 a.m.

British Prime Minister Theresa May says the government is working to learn the full details of the blast that killed 19 people at an Ariana Grande concert Monday night.

May says the government is trying to establish "the full details of what is being treated by the police as an appalling terrorist attack."

She said her thoughts are with the victims and the families of those who have been affected.

The government is expected to call an emergency cabinet meeting to deal with the incident.

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1:20 a.m.

Greater Manchester Police say 19 people have been confirmed dead in an explosion at Manchester Arena that is being treated as a possible terrorist attack.

Police said roughly 50 people were injured. Police said the incident started at 10:35 Monday night at an Ariana Grande concert.

Emergency vehicles were on the scene helping the injured and bomb disposal units were later seen outside the venue.

There was mass panic after the explosion at the end of the concert, which was part of Grande's The Dangerous Woman Tour.

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1:05 a.m.

Bomb disposal units were seen at Manchester Arena after an explosion during an Ariana Grande concert.

They were called after reports of an explosion that police said caused fatalities.

There were few immediate details and trains into the area were suspended.

A representative of Grande's US record label says the singer is OK and they are investigating what happened.

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11:55 p.m.

Police says there are "a number of fatalities" after reports of an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in northern England.

Police advised the public to avoid the area around the Manchester Arena Monday night.

There were no immediate details of what happened during the concert by the American singer.

Video from inside the arena showed concertgoers screaming as they made their way out amid a sea of pink balloons.

The Latest: Police say 19 killed in blast at Grande concert

The Latest on an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, that authorities say killed several people. (all times local):

1:20 a.m.

Greater Manchester Police say 19 people have been confirmed dead in an explosion at Manchester Arena that is being treated as a possible terrorist attack.

Police said roughly 50 people were injured. Police said the incident started at 10:35 Monday night at an Ariana Grande concert.

Emergency vehicles were on the scene helping the injured and bomb disposal units were later seen outside the venue.

There was mass panic after the explosion at the end of the concert, which was part of Grande's The Dangerous Woman Tour.

___

1:05 a.m.

Bomb disposal units were seen at Manchester Arena after an explosion during an Ariana Grande concert.

They were called after reports of an explosion that police said caused fatalities.

There were few immediate details and trains into the area were suspended.

A representative of Grande's US record label says the singer is OK and they are investigating what happened.

___

11:55 p.m.

Police says there are "a number of fatalities" after reports of an explosion at an Ariana Grande concert in northern England.

Police advised the public to avoid the area around the Manchester Arena Monday night.

There were no immediate details of what happened during the concert by the American singer.

Video from inside the arena showed concertgoers screaming as they made their way out amid a sea of pink balloons.

Lawsuit: Fyre music fest more 'Hunger Games' than Coachella

Litigation is piling up like bonfire kindling against organizers of the Fyre Festival that flamed out in a fiasco.

Angry participants had lashed out on social media with the hashtag #fyrefraud as the music festival fell apart on an island in the Bahamas in April and fraud is the first claim in a $100 million class-action suit.

The suit amended earlier this month in federal court on behalf of a Los Angeles man said the events planned over two weekends were "nothing more than a get-rich-quick scam" akin to a Ponzi scheme that put the lives — and small fortunes — of thousands of participants in jeopardy.

"The festival's lack of adequate food, water, shelter, and medical care created a dangerous and panicked situation among attendees — suddenly finding themselves stranded on a remote island without basic provisions — that was closer to 'The Hunger Games' or 'Lord of the Flies' than Coachella," according to the suit filed by attorney Mark Geragos.

The lawsuit is one of several filed in the wake of the disaster that unfolded on the island of Exuma late last month when inadequate planning and facilities led performers to bow out and organizers to cancel the show once billed as the "the cultural experience of the decade."

In the amended complaint filed in U.S. District Court, Geragos said 300 people had contacted his offices after the initial suit was filed last month against organizers Billy McFarland, rapper Ja Rule, whose real name is Jeffrey Atkins, and Fyre Media Inc. Among dozens of unnamed defendants are deep-pocketed investors who provided seed money for the event.

The event promoted on social media by Kendall Jenner, Bella Hadid, Emily Ratajkowski and other models and celebrities targeted well-heeled Millennials with ticket packages ranging from $1,200 to over $100,000 and promising five-star dining and luxury accommodations. Headliners included rockers Blink-182, hip-hop act Migos and the electronic music trio Major Lazer.

Instead of putting the tropical island on the map as the next big destination music experience, Fyre Festival only succeeded in sparking outrage.

Participants arrived to find a venue partly under construction, insipid food and soggy beds under leaking tents. One photo included in the suit showed a Styrofoam container with bread, two pieces of packaged cheese, lettuce and sliced tomato.

Lawsuits filed in New York and Miami federal courts made similar claims after Geragos filed the Los Angeles case.

Attorney Stacey Richman, who represents Ja Rule, said he wouldn't participate in anything fraudulent.

After the event was canceled, the rapper had posted an apology online saying he was heartbroken, but that it was not a scam and it was not his fault.

Efforts to reach McFarland, Fyre Media or attorneys who have responded to lawsuits on their behalf were unsuccessful.

McFarland previously promised full refunds and offered his apology on the festival's website. He also said he would offer free VIP passes to next year's festival.

Zack Snyder exits 'Justice League' after daughter's death

The recent death of director Zack Snyder's daughter has driven the prominent filmmaker to step away from finishing the ensemble superhero movie "Justice League."

A source close to production who was not authorized to speak publicly said Monday that director Joss Whedon would take over completing the film, which should still hit its Nov. 17 release.

Snyder and his wife and producing partner Deborah Snyder told The Hollywood Reporter they will be using the time away to focus on their family and seven children.

The Reporter story stated Snyder's 20-year-old daughter, Autumn, killed herself in March. Coroner's spokesman Ed Winter said Autumn Snyder's March 12 death is being investigated as a possible suicide due to an overdose of prescription medications. The official cause of death has been deferred pending toxicology results.

Snyder told the magazine that at first he tried to throw himself back into work, but in the past two months realized he needed to be with his family — especially as additional photography shoots in London loomed on the horizon.

"They are all having a hard time. I'm having a hard time," Snyder said.

The Snyders are cornerstone players in Warner Bros. production of DC Comics films. He directed both "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice" and "Man of Steel" and is serving as a producer on the additional films in the DC Universe, including last year's "Suicide Squad" and the upcoming "Wonder Woman."

"Justice League" is a critical entry in the slate of DC films, bringing together major superheroes like Ben Affleck's Batman, Henry Cavill's Superman, Gal Gadot's Wonder Woman, Ezra Miller's The Flash and Jason Momoa's Aquaman.

Whedon, who directed the Marvel Comics ensemble films "The Avengers" and its sequel "Age of Ultron," and is writing and directing "Batgirl" for Warner Bros., has been working with Snyder on "Justice League" for over a month. In addition to post-production work, Whedon will also shoot some additional scenes for the film.

Warner Bros. Pictures president Toby Emmerich told the Reporter that the additional scenes will adhere to the style and template set by Snyder.

Snyder said he knows fans will be worried about the film without him at the helm.

But, he added, "In the end, it's just a movie. It's a great movie. But it's just a movie."

Blast at Ariana Grande concert in England kills 19 people

An explosion struck an Ariana Grande concert attended by thousands of young music fans in northern England, killing at least 19 people and injuring dozens in what police said Tuesday was being treated as a terrorist attack.

Greater Manchester Police said 19 people were confirmed dead after the explosion at Manchester Arena. Northwest Ambulance Service said 59 injured people had been taken to hospitals, and a number of "walking wounded" were treated at the scene.

Police cars, bomb-disposal units and 60 ambulances raced to the scene as the scale of the carnage became clear.

"We are currently treating this as a terrorist incident until we know otherwise," said Ian Hopkins, chief constable of Greater Manchester Police.

There was panic after the explosion, which struck around 10:30 p.m. (2130GMT) Monday night as Grande was ending the concert, part of her Dangerous Woman Tour.

Grande, who was not injured, tweeted hours later: "Broken. From the bottom of my heart, I am so so sorry. I don't have words."

Manchester Arena said on its website that the blast struck outside the venue as concertgoers were leaving. Some eyewitnesses said it happened in the foyer of the arena just after the concert ended.

One witness said Grande had just finished her final song and said "Thank you, Manchester," before leaving the stage.

The incident led to a nightlong search for loved ones as parents tried to locate their teenage children and groups of friends scattered by the explosion sought to find one another.

Taxi services offered to give stranded concertgoers rides home for free, and residents opened their homes to provide lodging for people who could not get home because public transport had shut down.

City officials said the true spirit of Manchester would shine through despite the horrendous incident.

Twitter and Facebook were filled with appeals for information about people who had not been accounted for.

Jenny Brewster said she was leaving the concert with her 11-year-old daughter when the blast hit.

"As I turned around, boom, one loud noise," she told Sky News. "A gentleman said 'run!' so we ran."

Outside, she said, "you could smell the burning."

Britain's terrorist threat level stands at "severe," the second-highest rung on a five-point scale, meaning an attack is highly likely.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility. Online, supporters of the extremist Islamic State group, which holds territory in Iraq's Mosul and around its de facto capital in the Syrian city of Raqqa, celebrated the blast.

One wrote: "May they taste what the weak people in Mosul and (Raqqa) experience from their being bombed and burned," according to the U.S.-based SITE Intelligence Group.

If the incident is confirmed as a terrorist attack it would be the deadliest in Britain since four suicide bombers killed 52 London commuters on three subway trains and a bus in July 2005.

"A huge bomb-like bang went off that hugely panicked everyone and we were all trying to flee the arena," said concertgoer Majid Khan, 22. "It was one bang and essentially everyone from the other side of the arena where the bang was heard from suddenly came running towards us as they were trying to exit."

Added Oliver Jones, 17: "The bang echoed around the foyer of the arena and people started to run."

Video from inside the arena showed concertgoers screaming as they made their way out amid a sea of pink balloons.

British Prime Minister Theresa May said the government was working to establish "the full details of what is being treated by the police as an appalling terrorist attack."

May is due to chair a meeting of the government's COBRA emergency committee later Tuesday. She and other candidates suspended campaigning for Britain's June 8 election after the blast.

Police advised the public to avoid the area around the Manchester Arena, and the train station near the arena, Victoria Station, was evacuated and all trains canceled.

The Dangerous Woman tour is the third concert tour by 23-year-old Grande and supports her third studio album, "Dangerous Woman."

Grande's role as Cat Valentine on Nickelodeon's high school sitcom "Victorious" propelled her to teen idol status, starting in 2010.

The tour began in Phoenix, Arizona, in February. After Manchester, Grande was to perform at venues in Europe, including Belgium, Poland, Germany, Switzerland and France, with concerts in Latin America and Asia to follow.

Pop concerts and nightclubs have been a terrorism target before. Almost 90 people were killed by gunmen inspired by Islamic State at the Bataclan concert hall in Paris during a performance by Eagles of Death Metal in November 2015.

In Turkey, 39 people died when a gunman attacked New Year's revelers at the Reina nightclub in Istanbul.

Manchester, 160 miles (260 kilometers) northwest of London, was hit by a huge Irish Republican Army bomb in 1996 that leveled a swath of the city center. More than 200 people were injured, though no one was killed.

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Katz and Lawless reported from London. AP writer Leanne Italie in New York and AP Music Writer Mesfin Fekadu in Jersey City, New Jersey, contributed to this report.

Man charged in scheme to sell paintings from $500M art heist

A West Virginia man tried to fetch millions for two oil paintings he did not have access to and falsely claimed were stolen in the largest art heist in U.S. history, federal authorities said Monday.

Todd Desper, of Beckley, West Virginia, was arrested Monday at his home on wire fraud charges. He will appear first in a federal court in West Virginia Tuesday before facing the charges in Boston in June. It couldn't be determined Monday if he has an attorney.

FBI Agent Geoffrey Kelly said in an affidavit that Desper, 47, solicited buyers on Craigslist for two of the most valuable paintings stolen from Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in 1990: "Storm on the Sea of Galilee" and "The Concert." He used a digital image that was a purported close-up of one of the paintings, Kelly said.

The actual paintings were among 13 stolen in the still-unsolved heist. The FBI told The Associated Press in August 2015 that two suspects who masqueraded as police officers to rob the museum of $500 million worth of masterpieces are deceased.

Desper sought $50 million for "The Concert" and $5 million for "Storm on the Sea of Galilee," authorities said.

Authorities were notified by individuals seeking to help recover the artwork and those seeking the $5 million reward offered by the museum.

Authorities said Anthony Amore, the security director for the Gardner Museum, worked with federal authorities to determine whether Desper actually had access to the paintings.

Federal prosecutors said the investigation ultimately found that Desper had no access to or information about the paintings and was engaged in a multimillion dollar fraud scheme targeting foreign art buyers.

Desper denied having knowledge of the museum theft when questioned, according to the affidavit.

Judge: Sound engineer can't publish unreleased Prince tracks

A sound engineer who worked with Prince is barred from publishing or disseminating any unreleased recordings that compromise the late superstar's work.

George Ian Boxill worked with Prince on five tracks in 2006 and made at least one recording — "Deliverance" — available online last month. Prince's estate and Paisley Park Enterprises sued to block it.

On Monday, U.S. District Judge Wilhelmina Wright issued a preliminary injunction saying Boxill and independent label RMA can't publish unreleased recordings until the dispute is resolved. They are also barred from using Prince's trademark to sell or promote "Deliverance."

The lawsuit says Boxill signed a confidentiality agreement that the recordings would remain Prince's property. Prince sings and plays guitar and keyboard on the tracks.

Prince died last year of an accidental opioid overdose.

PBS airing live nature special from Alaska this summer

PBS is collaborating with the BBC on a special live event this summer where cameras will try to catch bears, wolves, eagles and other wildlife in their natural habitat in Alaska.

"Wild Alaska Live" will air over three nights on PBS on July 23, 26 and 30. Cameras placed in the Tongass National Forest, the Kenai Fjords National Park, in Hallo Bay and other locations will hunt for wildlife as the show discusses how the state's human population interacts with nature.

The show is similar to "Big Blue Live," a 2015 event focused on marine life in California's Monterey Bay. That was another partnership with the BBC, said Beth Hoppe, chief programming officer at PBS.

"Live natural history has really caught on for them," Hoppe said. "For them, it's a big spectacle. For us, it's a way to dip our toes into the space."

Brothers Chris and Martin Kratt of the PBS Kids series "Wild Kratts" will host the event.

PBS has a run of natural history and science programming lined up for its "Summer of Adventure." Next month will see the start of multi-part series "The Story of China" and "Big Pacific," the latter on the ocean's "most guarded secrets." ''Nature's Great Race" details stories of migration, and PBS will also show travelogues in Cuba and Ireland.

Through the adventure programming and other series, PBS is emphasizing family friendly viewing at a time it sees competing broadcast networks getting away from that notion, Hoppe said. An adaptation of "Anne of Green Gables" did well for the network last fall, and PBS has agreed to air two other films in a related trilogy. PBS is also planning a three-hour version of "Little Women."

"It's a good thing to emphasize right now," she said.

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