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Chin up: 4 ways to get over the rejection and ace the rejection letter

Receiving a rejection letter is never enjoyable, but responding properly will help you place the experience in the "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger" category. Resisting the urge toward self-pity is important, according to LinkedIn job search expert Susan P. Joyce, because rejection can douse you with the kind of negative energy that will drain you and make the next stage of your job search tougher.

>> Read more trending news 

Instead, try these four proven methods for responding positively to a rejection letter:

1. Don't go away mad

Don't allow yourself to become angry at the employer, the situation or yourself, U.S. News and World Report advises. "You might think that you were perfect for the job and resent the employer for not seeing it, or even feel angry that you spent your time interviewing. But rejection comes with the territory when you're hunting for a job."

Remind yourself that a rejection letter is definitely preferable to the increasing tendency of employers to "ghost" applicants instead of directly rejecting them.

2. Send a thank-you note

"If you sincerely liked the people and the organization and would want to be considered when another opportunity opens there, the biggest mistake you can make is giving up on the employer and the people you liked," notes Joyce. 

3. Remember you might be a runner up

Especially if you were one of a few finalists for a job, things might still go your way after you receive that rejection letter, notes Business Insider. The company might decide to hire two people, or the first hire might ultimately reject the job offer or never start the job. If that happens, you want to be on the record as someone who can stand tall even after getting a rejection letter.

4. Ask, without arguing

The company that rejected you can't really harm you further, so you have nothing to lose by asking the hiring manager for feedback, career coach Ashley Stahl told Forbes. Employers aren't likely to respond helpfully to a general question like, "Why didn't I get the job?" but you can gain helpful input with strategic, pointed questions. Stahl recommends a query such as, "Was there something missing from my background that you were looking for?" to allow you to pinpoint what you might need for a similar job with other employers.

RELATED: 5 things that are costing you the promotion you want

Delta hiring 1,000 flight attendants

Delta Air Lines is hiring more than 1,000 flight attendants.

>> Read more trending news

The average entry-level flight attendant at Delta earns about $25,000 a year, “with an opportunity to earn more depending upon schedule,” according to airline officials.

Officials with Atlanta-based Delta said applicants must have a high school degree or GED, be at least 21 years old, be able to work in the United States and be fluent in English.

The ideal candidate is also fluent in a language other than English, has education beyond high school and more than a year of experience in customer service, patient care or a similar role. Other experience that helps includes work to ensure the safety or care of others, such as a teacher, military, EMT, firefighter, coach, law enforcement, lifeguard or nurse, according to Delta officials.

Airline officials said 150,000 people applied for about 1,200 flight attendant positions last year, and fewer than 1 percent of applicants were selected.

Delta officials said “based on those odds, it’s easier to get into an Ivy League school than to become a Delta flight attendant.”

To learn more about Delta’s flight attendant jobs, click here.

75 percent of workplace harassment victims who complain face retaliation, study finds

comprehensive study conducted in 2016  by the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission uncovered some troubling truths about harassment in the workplace.

» RELATED: Sexual harassment in the workplace: What is it, how to report it and more you should know

In a preface to the report, EEOC co-chairs wrote the number of harassment complaints the team receives every year is still striking 30 years after the U.S. Supreme Court recognized sexual harassment as a form of discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

>> Read more trending news

“We present this report with a firm, and confirmed, belief that too many people in too many workplaces find themselves in unacceptably harassing situations when they are simply trying to do their jobs,” the co-chairs wrote.

» RELATED: #MeToo: Women share harrowing accounts of sexual assault, harassment

The EEOC selected a 16-member team from a variety of disciplines and regions to be part of the Select Task Force on the Study of Harassment in the Workplace, to conduct an 18-month study in which they heard from more than 30 witnesses and received numerous public comments.

Here are some of the report’s key findings about workplace harassment: 

It’s still a problem.

Nearly one-third of the 90,000 charges EEOC received in 2015 included an allegation of workplace harassment, according to the report.

» RELATED: After defending Harvey Weinstein, director Oliver Stone accused of sexual assault by Playboy model

It too often goes unreported.

Roughly three out of four victims of harassment spoke to a supervisor or representative about the harassment.

It’s also common, the report found, for those who experience harassment to either ignore and avoid the harasser, downplay the situation, try to forget the harassment or endure it.

“Employees who experience harassment fail to report the harassing behavior or to file a complaint because they fear disbelief of their claim, inaction on their claim, blame, or social or professional retaliation,” report authors wrote.

» RELATED: Jane Fonda on Harvey Weinstein: ‘I’m ashamed I didn’t say anything’

Anywhere between 25-85 percent of women reported sex-based harassment.

Using testimonies and academic articles, analysts dug deeper into the widely divergent numbers.

They found that when asked if they experienced “sexual harassment” without defining the term, 25 percent of women reported they had.

The rate grew to 40 percent when employees were asked about specific unwanted sex-based behaviors.

And when respondents were asked similar questions in surveys using convenience samples, or people who are easy to reach, such as student volunteers, the incidence rate rose to 75 percent, researchers found.

» RELATED: Harvey Weinstein booted from film academy

“Based on this consistent result, researchers have concluded that many individuals do not label certain forms of unwelcome sexually based behaviors – even if they view them as problematic or offensive – as ‘sexual harassment,’” authors wrote.

More men are reporting workplace sexual assault.

According to the EEOC, reports of men experiencing workplace sexual assault have nearly doubled between 1990 and 2009 and now account for 8 to 16 percent of all claims.

» RELATED: Sexual harassment in the workplace: What is it, how to report it and more you should know

Seventy-five percent of harassment victims faced retaliation when they came forward.

The EEOC report noted the results of a 2003 study, which found “75 percent of employees who spoke out against workplace mistreatment faced some form of retaliation.”

Victims often avoid reporting the harassment, because they feel it’s the most “reasonable” course of action, another researcher found.

Indifference or trivialization in the organization, according to the report, can harm the victim “in terms of adverse job repercussions and psychological distress.”

These are just some of the risk factors associated with workplace harassment:

  • Workplaces with lack of diversity in terms of gender, race or ethnicity, age
  • Workplaces with extreme diversity
  • Workplaces with many young workers
  • Workplaces with significant power disparities, such as companies with executives, military member, plant managers
  • Service industries that rely on customer service or client satisfaction
  • Workplaces with monotonous or low-intensity tasks

In addition to being plain wrong, there’s a business case for stopping and preventing harassment.

The EEOC report found there are a multitude of financial costs associated with harassment complaints, such as time and resources dealing with litigation, settlements and damages.

Harassment can also lead to decreased workplace performance and productivity, reputational harm and increased turnover rates.

But the bottom line, according to the report, is: “Employers should care about preventing harassment because it is the right thing to do, and because stopping illegal harassment is required of them.”

You can read the full report at eeoc.gov.

10 ways to keep your spirits up during a job search

Job hunting can be a tenuous, frustrating process. Endless rounds of leads and interviews that never go anywhere are exhausting.

>> Read more trending news

How do you keep going when you’re feeling constantly rejected?

Here are 10 tips for job seekers:

1. Determine the worst-case scenario

How bad can it get? If you think it over, in nearly all cases, this outcome is not as bad as you initially thought.

Think out a plan to overcome your potential obstacles. Determine the rewards of your desired outcome and strive for them by executing your plan through both the ups and downs.

2. Don’t make it personal

It’s easy to start thinking it’s you, not them. You wonder what others have that you don’t. You wonder what you need to fix that others don’t.

Try to keep your perspective, and remember that there are many reasons it may not have worked out. Maybe the position was filled by an internal candidate. Maybe your interviewer had an off-day, which tainted his or her opinion of you during the interview.

“No” isn’t a judgment against you – it’s just something that happens.

3. It’s a process

The idea that someone is going to pick you off the street and hand you a job in which you will make tons of money and be perfectly satisfied is a lovely idea. However, it doesn’t generally work like that. It’s a process.

Commit to take meaningful steps through that process, including applying for jobs both in and out of your comfort zone, working your contacts and being prepared for rejections.

4. Build your enthusiasm for each job

Ask yourself one question when you’re scanning job listings – can I get excited by this job? If you’re not excited or confident about your ability to produce great results for potential employers, do not expect them to be excited and confident about potentially hiring you.

Employers are looking for problem-solvers who can help their firms make and/or save money. Honest enthusiasm will help fuel your pitch.

5. Give yourself a break

It can feel oppressive if you’re under pressure to find a new job. The constant strain can affect the way you sleep, the way your body digests food and your emotional state.

Give yourself permission to take a night or weekend off from applying. Dig into a favorite book or movie, and return to the job hunt rejuvenated.

6. Overcome your fears

If you are afraid of blowing the few job leads you may have because you do not know what to say to a potential employer, are not confident in your abilities to generate value and so on, do not use these fears as reasons to do nothing. You can overcome these worries with some practice.

For example, identify 5-10 companies you would never work for and use them to practice creating your own job market. If you can build up a reasonable argument why these companies should hire you, you’ll be ready for the companies that do want to hire you.

7. Adjust your strategy

If you’re not getting good results, try changing your strategy. This could mean developing an alternate resume or cover letter, or hiring someone to write one for you. You can also spread out into professional groups and do more face-to-face networking.

8. Combat isolation

An unexpected impact of a long, tough job hunt can be isolation — feeling distant and alone in your struggles while your friends and family go on with their regular lives.

An important part of finding your way through the job hunt is realizing that you don’t have to do it alone. Try bouncing some cover letters around with friends or old colleagues. Maybe ask someone to make an introduction. Look into meeting with a career advisor.

The important thing is to make connections.

9. Exercise and give back

Job seekers should exercise to counter stress, bad moods, low energy levels, and potential depression that can result from the job search.

RELATED: If you don’t work out and want to start, here’s how to create an exercise routine in 8 easy steps

Also give back by helping others or volunteering. The benefits of volunteering include a reduction in stress, physical pain and depression. It also increases the endorphin level, which helps people literally feel a rush of joy inside.

10. Take care of your finances

Sometimes, the only way to reassert control of your life is going out and spending money. That’ll end badly if you’re between jobs, though.

Don’t ignore a worsening financial situation; suck it up and deal with it. Look at how you can downsize, or consider getting a short-term job to keep your finances ticking while you keep looking for something long-term.

Keeping the basics covered in your life will help you stay as relaxed as possible and keep your mind on the job hunt.

RELATED: These 7 red flags in the workplace may be signs you’re about to lose your job

Now casting: Donald Glover's 'Atlanta' needs ‘beefy’ security guards

Are you ready to make your mark on Atlanta's film and TV industry? Are you the next Tyler Perry? ATL is in need of young stars. Check out the Peach City's latest casting call for your chance at fame.

»RELATED: 9 big movies filming in Georgia in 2017

'Atlanta'

The critically acclaimed FX series tells the story of two cousins involved in the Atlanta rap scene. It's created by and stars Stone Mountain native Donald Glover, who just won an Emmy for best comedic actor as well as one for directing in a comedic series.

What are they looking for?

Hispanic, Black, Asian and Caucasian men who look intimidating and are tall and beefy are needed to portray security personnel. You must also be at least 18 years old.

»RELATED: Take these classes and workshops to break into Georgia's film and TV industry

When are they filming?

Filming will take place in Atlanta from Oct. 11 to 13, and you'll need to be available all three days.

How much does it pay?

Pay is to be determined.

How do I submit?

Send an e-mail to Submissions@CatrettCasting.com with the subject line "SECURE" and include three clear, well-lit recent photos. Also submit your name, age, height, weight and current phone number.

»RELATED: 8 ways to increase your chances of making money as a film extra in Georgia

UPS hiring 95,000 workers nationwide

Not far ahead of the holiday season, UPS is gearing up for an increase in the number of deliveries and services associated with the busy fall and winter months. 

The company announced Wednesday a plan to hire 95,000 employees across the country. 

>> Read more trending news

The company will offer part- and full-time seasonal jobs, primarily package handlers, drivers and driver-helpers.

According to a news release, seasonal jobs often lead to longer-term positions with UPS, and up to 35 percent of employees hired seasonally over the last three years now have permanent jobs with the company.

“Our seasonal jobs often lead to permanent employment and even careers for some,” UPS CEO David Abney said in the release. “We offer flexible shifts and full- and part-time positions. If you are a student, a working mom or just looking to make extra money for the holidays, we have a job for you.”

Abney and other members of UPS leadership started their careers at the company as part-time workers. 

Seasonal and part-time UPS employees who become full-time permanent workers at the company are eligible for healthcare and retirement benefits, and employees enrolled in college are eligible to receive up to $25,000 in tuition assistance.

Apply for a job at UPS here.

Looking for a job? Here are the top 25 US cities to get hired

A new survey by job site Glassdoor named the country’s top 25 cities to find a job.

>> Read more trending news 

Glassdoor.com, a job site that analyzes data on job openings, quality of life and home values, rated Pittsburgh the No. 1 city for jobs in 2017.

Each city was ranked based on three factors: cost of living, job satisfaction and hiring opportunity. 

According to the report, Pittsburgh has more than 95,000 job openings, with civil engineer, registered nurse and project manager listed as “hot jobs.” The city has a $44,000 median base salary, and the median home value is $137,400.

The report, based on a comparison of the 50 most populated U.S. metropolitan cities, rated cities on a five-point scale to earn a “city score.” Pittsburgh earned 4.4 points, as did Indianapolis, Indiana; Kansas City, Missouri; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; St. Louis, Missouri; and Memphis, Tennessee.

Surprisingly, or maybe not so surprisingly, New York City, San Francisco and Los Angeles did not make the list.

Here is the full list of the best US cities to get a job, according to Glassdoor:

1. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania2. Indianapolis, Indiana3. Kansas City, Missouri4. Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina5. St. Louis, Missouri6. Memphis, Tennessee7. Columbus, Ohio8. Cincinnati, Ohio9. Cleveland, Ohio10. Louisville, Kentucky11. Birmingham, Alabama12. Detroit, Michigan13. Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota14. Hartford, Connecticut15. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma16. Washington D.C.

17. Seattle, Washington

18. Atlanta, Georgia19. Baltimore, Maryland20. Nashville, Tennessee21. Milwaukee, Wisconsin22. San Jose, California23. Chicago, Ilinois24. Charlotte, North Carolina25. Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas

Amelia Finefrock contributed to this report.

Aftermath of Hurricane Harvey brings job opportunities at FEMA to Texans

The U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency is hiring Texan workers to help with the recovery process after Hurricane Harvey.

>> Read more trending news

The new hires will assist teams of local, state and federal workers, along with volunteers from charities and community groups already on the ground, TIME reported.

The agency will work alongside the Texas Workforce Commission to place qualified workers where they can offer the most aid. Each position pays between $14 and $34 per hour.

The positions available through the FEMA program include:

  • Administrative support assistant
  • Civil engineer
  • Communications specialist
  • Construction cost estimator
  • Courier
  • Crisis counselor
  • Customer service specialist
  • Environmental specialist
  • Floodplain management specialist
  • Graphics specialist
  • Hazard mitigation outreach specialist
  • Historic preservation specialist
  • Registered nurse
  • Sign language interpreter
  • Voluntary agency liaison

RELATED: FEMA to states: plan for climate change or lose federal aid

In a press statement announcing the program, FEMA officials said that the agency “gains valuable community insights, provides jobs and puts Texans to work helping Texans.”

One position that demonstrates that mission is the customer service specialist, who will “serve as the primary point of contact for persons inquiring about disaster assistance,” according to the FEMA website.

The duties for this position will also include “assisting disaster victims, processing claim requests for disaster assistance, and providing information regarding available programs to individuals applying for disaster assistance.”

The agency is also opening up positions in its “reservist” program. The “temporary, on-call and intermittent” positions include duties ranging from hazard mitigation and remediation to historic preservation to financial management.

Interested applicants can submit their resumes and applications through the Texas Workforce Commission website or through the FEMA website.

The agency will be announcing new job postings as they become available.

Looking for dream nanny job? Gig offers $129,000 salary and access to life of luxury

Looking for a gig that incorporates your love for children and traveling? One family is on the hunt for a nanny who can keep an eye on their children and four homes, including one in Atlanta and three international locations.

>> Read more trending news 

This month, a London couple posted an opening on childcare.co.uk for a full-time, live-in nanny who would be responsible for caring for four kids ages 2 to 15 for six days a week from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. 

“I feel it is best to be upfront – the role is demanding,” the ad reads. But if you fit the bill, the job comes with some incredible perks.

It pays nearly $129,000 a year and requires the person to maintain the family’s four houses - located in London, Barbados, Cape Town and Atlanta. Additionally, the candidate must participate in the children’s home-school sessions; eat with them at every meal, which will be cooked by a Michelin star chef; and take them to various daily appointments. 

To do so, the nanny will have access to the family’s cars including a Porsche, Range Rover and Maserati, so a clean U.K. driving record is a must. 

» RELATED: Family seeks live-in nanny for their 'haunted' house

But the couple isn’t seeking the average babysitter. They need a nanny with no children. They must also have a child psychology degree, self-defense training and a minimum of 15 years of nanny experience. The kids must also like the applicant. 

They also noted that binge drinking or drug taking “will not be tolerated.” 

So far the couple has received more than 300 applications and are encouraging people to apply only if they are qualified. 

“If you do not have ALL the necessary qualifications, skills and experience for the role then we would politely request that you do not even bother making an application as it is a waste of our time and yours,” they wrote

Think you’re the perfect person for the job? Submit your application here.

5 highest-paying jobs you can get in Atlanta with an associate degree

If you'd like a job that pays well but don't necessarily have the time or money to invest in a bachelor's degree, there are still plenty of good jobs to be had in metro Atlanta if you have an associate degree. The following are five of the highest paying jobs you can get with a two-year degree, according to Business Insider:

»RELATED: AJC Top workplaces in Atlanta 2017

Air traffic controller

Air traffic controllers have the highest median annual wage of jobs in which a bachelor's degree isn't typically needed. These professionals monitor and direct the movement of aircraft and earn a median annual wage of around $122,950. Long-term on the job training is required, however, and you'll need to be a U.S. citizen and pass medical and background checks. You'll also need to pass exams and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) course.

Atlanta, of course, is home to Hartsfield-Jackson International, the world's busiest airport. A record 101.5 million passengers came through Hartsfield-Jackson in 2015, which handled more than 882,000 flights.

Architectural and civil drafters

As a drafter, you'll use software to convert designs into technical drawings that can include renderings of buildings, highways or bridges.

Recent job openings in Atlanta for architectural and civil drafters include opportunities to help design commercial construction projects as well as pipeline and petroleum terminal operations. The median annual salary for drafters is around $53,470.

Diagnostic medical sonographers

Ultrasound technology is perhaps best known as a way to check babies in utero, but it's also used to help diagnose many types of medical conditions. Sonographers can specialize in creating non-invasive images of specific parts of the body, such as the heart, vascular or nervous system and work in hospitals, outpatient care centers and doctors' offices.

Recent job listings in Atlanta include hospitals and doctors' offices looking to hire cardiac, vascular and breast ultrasound technologists. Sonographers can expect to earn a median salary of around $67,530.

Paralegals

Paralegals provide help and support to lawyers through services such as conducting research and drafting documents. Over 6,000 paralegals provide legal services in Georgia, and the metro Atlanta area has the fifth highest employment level in the country for this profession.

Most paralegals have an associate's degree or have earned certification in paralegal studies. Their median annual wage is around $48,810, and recent job listings for paralegals in metro Atlanta include openings for paralegals who specialize in immigration and worker's compensation cases, as well as a job with the Atlanta office of Geico staff counsel.

Radiation therapists

Radiation therapists administer radiation treatments to help treat cancer and other diseases. They also work with technology such as CAT scans. They're employed in settings such as hospitals, doctors' offices and outpatient centers. The career has been described by a chief radiation therapist as "a perfect balance between patient care and great technology."

With many major hospitals located in metro Atlanta, healthcare jobs are often plentiful. In fact, the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell metropolitan area ranks near the top for employment of radiation therapists, with an annual mean wage of $80,220.

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