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All aboard: Disney Cruise Line looks for workers to man its ship kid clubs

If you’ve dreamed of working on the high seas, then Disney is looking for you.

The cruise line that Mickey built is hiring youth activities counselors to live and work on its fleet of cruise ships, Metro reported.

>> Read more trending news 

The hours are long, according to Metro, at 80 hours a week, but the job offers fun and amazing ports of call in Mexico, Barcelona and Disney’s private island Castaway Cay.

The job posting opened in December, but it appears that the cruise line is still recruiting.

But not anyone can apply or be hired. You have to have two years’ recent experience working with children in a “high-volume, fast-paced recreational/camp environment.”

Among the other qualifications:

  • Must be able to command the attention of large groups of children
  • At least 20 years old
  • Work a seven-day 70-84 hour work week with limited time off
  • Adhere to Disney Cruise Line appearance guidelines

It would also help to be bilingual in Spanish or Portuguese and have experience working with children with special needs.

If chosen, cruise line cast members live with a roommate on board the ship and also must be willing and able to follow and lead the shipboard emergency procedures.

The positions are for any of the four Disney ships: the Wonder, Magic, Fantasy or Dream, and Disney’s private Bahamian island, the Liverpool Echo reported.

Click here to apply.

Apple hiring for work from home positions

Apple is looking for additions to its workforce and you don’t even have to leave home. 

The tech company is looking to fill about 50 AppleCare at-home positions to offer tech support of devices like iPhones, iPads and MacBooks, the Houston Chronicle reported

>> Read more trending news 

While working from home is a big enough perk for some, the job also comes with Apple discounts, paid time off and potential career growth, even for those who work part time, according to Apple’s job announcement.

Apple At Home employees work directly for Apple for the company’s normal support hours. There could be extra shifts for holidays, what’s considered “peak business hours,” and training.

Workers are required to have a distraction-free room that is quiet and that can be closed off to keep noise down, high-speed internet with at least 5 mps download/1 mps upload, a desk and an ergonomic chair. 

Apple provides the iMac and headset that is only for work.

Click here to see what jobs are open and to apply.

Now casting: Anika Noni Rose series seeking college students

Are you ready to make your mark on Atlanta's film and TV industry? Are you the next Tyler Perry? ATL is in need of young stars. Check out the Peach City's latest casting call for your chance at fame.

»RELATED: 9 big movies filming in Georgia in 2017

'The Quad'

Anika Noni Rose ("For Colored Girls," "Dreamgirls"), Atlanta resident Masud Olufani and Jasmine Guy ("A Different World") star in "The Quad," a scripted drama set at Georgia A&M, a fictional historically black college in Atlanta.

What are they looking for?

African-American culture fest students age 18 to 35 are needed.

»RELATED: The 69 TV shows that are now being produced in Atlanta

When are they filming?

Filming will be in downtown Atlanta on Dec. 14 and 15 with a preliminary call time of 6 a.m. You can work one or both days but should have all-day availability.

How much does it pay?

Pay is $64 for eight hours.

How do I submit?

Send an email to TheQuadExtras@gmail.com with the subject line "CULTURAL FEST (and put 12/14, 12/15 or BOTH)". Include your name, number, age, height, sizes (shirt, pants, jacket, etc.), location and whether you have any visible tattoos and if so, where they're located. Also submit two photos (one headshot and one full body) and include your car type, model and year.

»RELATED: Get the scoop on what film and TV extras get paid in Atlanta

7 temp holiday jobs to flip into full-time fun

Some holiday gigs require treating naughty shoppers nice. Others demand that you bring joy to the world in the midst of melancholy weather.

If you're up for the challenge of fast-paced, unpredictable seasonal work with a good attitude and work ethic, you might set yourself up for a potentially permanent position.

RELATED: 5 unique side gigs you’ll probably enjoy more than your day job

The following popular brands may start you off as a volunteer or part-time employee, but if you perform above standard and prove to your boss you're reliable, your next step could mean career advancement:

Package handlers: Across the nation this time of year, UPS hires a barrage of part-time package handlers to help carefully load/unload trucks, sort packages and work in teams. 

How to advance in this job: Learn your team members and pick up their slack when opportunities open. UPS proudly shares on its site that many of its senior managers started as college-age package handlers. Find out who these folks are, and prove to them you're willing to get the job done in order to move up the corporate ladder after the holiday season ends.

RELATED: UPS hiring 95,000 workers nationwide

Bell ringers: Simply register to ring for The Salvation Army during the holidays, and your volunteer efforts will help raise money for those in need via the international charitable organization's Red Kettle Campaign

How to advance in this job: This cold-weather gig teaches patience, hones people skills and sharpens fundraising abilities. The cool part: You come across so many influential holiday shoppers who respect your effort as well, so if they have business cards on hand, take one. Once the holiday season campaign is complete, add this fundraising experience to your resume. Then research the organization's employment opportunities across the nation. Apply for a full-time job in line with your temporary experience (ex: a Red Kettle coordinator).

Retail cashiers: Have an evergreen eye for visually restocking a store for the holidays? Maybe you're great with numbers and swiftly ringing up customers. If so, join a brand like Target, which stays in the Christmas shopping fray and offers fun gigs such as visual merchandising and working as a beauty team member. Consistent seasonal warehouse work is also available to help move merchandise. How to advance in these jobs: After you've gotten your foot in the door with temporary work, look into the company's store and corporate careers that match your newly acquired skills but in long-term leadership roles.

Santa's helpers: If you have the ability to make people laugh, consider working for photography companies that need assistance with putting genuine smiles on faces. Companies like sweet treat producer Hershey's Chocolate World have openings for museum or mall-like photo ops with Santa.

 How to advance in this job: After developing key on-the-job soft skills — becoming adaptable to fussy little ones, confident with posing people, enthusiastic about coming up with new ideas and flexible with scheduling — make plans to apply and upgrade your position to other areas that demand innovative thinking.

Gift wrappers: Neat, crafty and hot-with-the-hands job seekers should give Santa's workshop settings a holiday shot. Businesses like Macy's and Neiman Marcus encourage such talent to work as seasonal retail gift registry advisers and gift wrap associates. A creative gig that always alleviates customers' post-holiday shopping, professional gift wrapping tests your customer service and focus skills. 

How to advance in these jobs: Prominent retail brands are constantly on the lookout for savvy retail employees, whether in beauty, personal shopping or sales, for permanent hire. Maintain a good rapport with management during the seasonal work, and inquire regularly about new opportunities that extend beyond the bustling holiday period.

Shelter servers: Bring a little holiday cheer to those lacking basic needs in your community. National nonprofits such as Feeding America offer opportunities to help end hunger on local to national levels through food banks and pantries. These volunteer experiences personally push you to relate and care for those in difficult situations and from diverse backgrounds; build strong networks with like-minded individuals; and ultimately are fulfilling because you're contributing to global initiatives. How to advance in this job: Cultivate professional connections, learn the logistics of community outreach and understand the personal stories beyond these movements during holiday efforts. Doing so will strengthen your portfolio and make you a standout candidate when organizations have leadership positions available at food banks and within corporate offices.

Delivery drivers: Capitalize on giving holiday shoppers and tourists a Lyft or Uber ride to places like the grocery store, post office and major festive events. Providing a safe, smooth riding experience to and from venues guarantees fast cash and establishes an instant clientele. 

How to advance in this job: Maintaining a steady flow of fares during and after the holiday season could easily make this line of work a lasting labor of love. You will start transporting so many individuals from interesting traveling backgrounds. Who knows? That next airport fare just might become your career ticket to a full-time transportation or customer service position offering more pay.

Here’s what to do if you are sexually harassed at work

Sexual harassment is not uncommon in the workplace. In a 2015 survey of 2,235 full-time and part-time female employees, Cosmopolitan found 1 in 3 women experienced sexual harassment at work at some point in their lives.

Here’s what you should know about sexual harassment in the workplace, according to the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Department of Labor:

What is sexual harassment?

Generally, sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination. It violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination in the workplace on the basis of sex, race, color, national origin and religion.

Title VII applies to employers with 15 or more employees.

According to the Department of Labor, there are two forms of sexual harassment:

  • Quid pro quo: Involves an employment decision based on submission to the sexual harassment, such as promotion, assignment or keeping your job
  • Hostile work environment: Sexual harassment makes workplace hostile, intimidating, abusive or offensive

Are there state laws with more protections against sexual harassment in addition to Title VII?

Some states have adopted stronger protections. Harassment can include, but is not limited to:

  • Unwelcome sexual advances;
  • Requests for sexual favors;
  • Other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature;
  • Non-sexual but offensive remarks about a person’s sex.

Harassment is illegal when:

  • Conduct is unwelcome;
  • Conduct is “based on the victim’s protected status”;
  • Subjectively abusive to person affected;
  • “Severe and pervasive” enough to create a work environment that a “reasonable person” would find hostile.

What factors are used to determine of harassment is “severe and pervasive” enough?

  • Frequency of unwelcome conduct;
  • Severity of conduct;
  • Whether conduct was physically threatening/humiliating or “mere offensive utterance”;
  • Where conduct “unreasonably” interfered with work performance;
  • Effect on employee’s psychological well-being;
  • Whether harasser was a superior at the organization.

From the Department of Labor:

Each factor is considered, but none are required or dispositive. Hostile work environment cases are often difficult to recognize, because the particular facts of each situation determine whether offensive conduct has crossed the line from “ordinary tribulations of the workplace, such as the sporadic use of abusive language . . . and occasional teasing,” to unlawful harassment.

However, the intent of the Department of Labor's Harassing Conduct Policy is to provide a process for addressing incidents of unwelcome conduct long before they become severe and pervasive enough to create a hostile work environment under the law.

Does the gender of the victim or harasser matter?

No. Both the victim and harasser can be either a woman or a man — or both can be the same sex.

Does the title of the harasser matter?

No. The harasser can be the victim’s supervisor, a supervisor in another department, a coworker, an employee of a separate employer, a client or a customer.

What about teasing?

According to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the law doesn’t prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments or isolated incidents that are “not very serious.”

However, teasing becomes illegal when:

  • The behavior becomes frequent or severe;
  • The behavior creates a hostile or offensive work environment;
  • The behavior results in an adverse employment decision (victim is fired or demoted).

What if you weren’t directly harassed but you feel affected?

You do not have to be the victim of direct harassment to be affected by the offensive conduct. It is still considered sexual harassment, according to the EEOC.

What should you do if you experience sexual harassment?

Inform the harasser at once that the behavior is unwelcome, then directly use “any employer complaint mechanism or grievance system available.” 

This may include reaching out to your direct manager or employer or talking to your company’s human resources department. Check your employee handbook for more information.

If you really can’t find someone you trust, labor and law employment attorney Nannina Angioni suggests you contact the Department of Fair Employment and Housing.

Experts also recommend filing a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Find directions on the EEOC’s website.

You may also want to continue keeping a record of the discriminatory activity and seek support from friends and family.

What if speaking out is too difficult?

“Some victims will never report abuse, and they have that right,” psychologist Nekeshia Hammond told NBC News. “It’s a case by case thing, and sometimes there’s a reason for staying silent — if you feel your safety is threatened, or if you’re literally on the verge of having an emotional breakdown and will be unable to function. But you need to reach out to someone.”

Hammond recommends calling the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-HOPE (4673), which includes free services and confidential support.

Can staying silent work against me, legally?

According to the Department of Labor, “the department cannot correct harassing conduct if a supervisor, manager or other Department official does not become aware of it.”

In fact, when an employee “unreasonably fails to report harassing conduct,” the department can use this as a defense against a suit for harassment.

Additionally, if you file a complaint with the EEOC, it’s recommended you do so within 180 days of the discriminatory activity.

» RELATED: Woman says she lost work hours after reporting sexual harassment

How does the EEOC investigate allegations of sexual harassment?

The department looks at the circumstances of the misconduct, the nature of the sexual advances and the context in which the incidents allegedly occurred.

“A determination on the allegations is made from the facts on a case-by-case basis,” the EEOC website states.

How can companies stop sexual harassment from occurring?

According to the EEOC, prevention is the best tool. Employers should be vocal about the intolerance of sexual harassment and establish a complaint and grievance system.

Learn more about workplace sexual harassment at dol.gov and eeoc.gov.

Now casting: Tyler Perry production seeking preteens

Are you ready to make your mark on Atlanta's film and TV industry? Are you the next Tyler Perry? ATL is in need of young stars. Check out the Peach City's latest casting call for your chance at fame.

»RELATED: 9 big movies filming in Georgia in 2017

Tyler Perry production

No details have been released yet, but Perry has signed a deal with Viacom.

What are they looking for?

African-American/mixed girls age 10 to 12 are needed. One should be light-skinned and light-eyed, and two can be of any complexion.

»RELATED: This is what it's really like to work as an extra in Atlanta

When are they filming?

Filming will be in Atlanta for one day only in mid-December.

How much does it pay?

Pay is to be determined.

How do I submit?

Send head shots, a resume and a direct contact number to submissions.sca@gmail.com. Put "SQUARE SPACE" in the subject line.

»RELATED: 6 ways to nail your casting audition in Atlanta

Should companies hire more remote workers? CEOs, employees weigh in

Should companies hire more remote workers?

Wooed by the appeal of waking up later and working in pajamas, many company employees would answer with an emphatic “yes.” 

And some company leaders agree. 

“The happiest and most productive companies are staffed by teams who work remotely,” says Brian de Haaff, CEO of product roadmap software Aha!.

>> Read more trending news 

De Haaff, who leads a team of remote workers, believes remote work gives employers access to a larger talent pool, while giving remote workers more freedom, better health, a bigger sense of accomplishment and more room to be productive.

De Haaf, who says remote workers are outperforming office-bound employees, cites benefits for remote workers as follows:

  • No need to settle for a job within driving distance of one’s home
  • No need to rush home for family duties -- you’re already there
  • No commute means more time for sleep and exercise
  • Distance makes the heart grow fonder, not complacent, which means working remotely leads to more meaningful conversations with co-workers
  • Fewer office distractions means more time to be productive

“Remote work leads to happier and more productive teams. And when workers are happy and productive, they bring their best to each day -- which in turn leads to happier customers,” de Haaff wrote in a LinkedIn blog post. “In other words, everyone benefits.”

But Richard Laermer, CEO of RLM Public Relations, believes otherwise. 

“I think people have to be trusted,” Laermer told Bloomberg. “But the working-from-home thing has to be on a per-person basis, and it can’t be very often. It just doesn’t work.”

Laermer, who once let his workers do their jobs remotely often, used to believe that “you can get your work done anywhere, as long as you actually get it done.” But he had a change of heart after employees took advantage of the perk by being unavailable online and refusing to go into the office for meetings.

Other companies, including Yahoo, IBM and Best Buy, which once allowed more workers to do their jobs remotely, have rolled back at-home allowances, with some claiming remote workers are more likely to get distracted by non-work-related tasks.

According to The New York Times, people employed in the fields of community and social services; science, engineering and architecture; and education, training and library, are less likely to work remotely. And that may be fair, The Atlantic reported, as jobs in those fields -- and others -- often require in-person interactions with clients and customers or “collaborative efficiency,” necessary for solving problems as a group.

But many workers and studies show working remotely has benefits that can’t be denied.

Bloomberg points out that more telecommuters means more savings for companies because they don’t have to pay fees and monthly costs to rent out large office buildings.

“People do their best work when they are given the autonomy to work where they need to,” Michael Beach, a business adviser, wrote on a LinkedIn forum about remote work. “The ideal situation is allowing people to work at the office and at home and let them decide how best to deliver the results that you're counting on them to produce.”

“Depends on the professional and the scope of work activities,” Lori Ann Reese, a brand manager and content specialist, wrote on the same forum. “Culture of the business, nature of the job duties, and strengths of the worker are all factors that decide whether it ‘works’ or does not.”

Regardless of one’s view, remote work is growing. According to the Society of Human Resource Management, remote work has increased 20 percent in the last 20 years. And a Gallup report found that “flexible scheduling and work-from-home opportunities play a major role in an employee’s decision to take or leave a job.”

6 things to know about working for Uber

Uber has been making headlines in recent months for everything from a new CEO to industry regulation. But if you want to work as a driver for the service that revolutionized the taxi-transport industry, there is more important information about Uber you'll want to check out.

RELATED: 5 things to know before becoming a Lyft driver

Here are six things you need to know about Uber before working for them as a driver:

Uber has its own system for estimating earnings. When you see those tantalizing statistics about how much Uber drivers in your area are making, keep in mind that they're not referring to a profitable side hustle or long-term estimations. Uber estimates local net median hourly earnings of drivers using stats from the previous month and assumes you'd be working 40 hours per week and four weeks per month.

You need to be a fit driver to work for Uber. If you've sat in the back of an Uber vehicle on your way home from a bar and thought, "I could do this," well, maybe. But before you even start worrying about your vehicle qualifying, recognize that you yourself could be denied work for any number of reasons, according to an article written by Ridester staff and last updated in September 2017. 

To start, you must be 21 to drive for Uber and have three years of driving experience. From there, it gets trickier. You'll need an in-state drivers license, in-state insurance with your name on the policy and pass a background check successfully. 

You must not appear on any national or state sex offender registries or suspected terrorist databases.

 And just in case you think you're home free, you might also face disqualification if you've got one of these on your record:

  • DUI or drug related driving conviction
  • Fraud
  • Reckless driving
  • Hit and run
  • Violent crime (assault, battery, homicide)
  • Act of terror
  • Sexual offense
  • Crime involving property damage
  • Felony or misdemeanor for theft (burglary, stealing, robbery or anything similar)
  • Fatal accidents
  • Resisting/evading arrest
  • Any other felony
  • You'll also be disqualified if within the past three years you have driven on a suspended, revoked or invalid license.

Your vehicle's gotta be fairly roomy. Even to drive for UberX, the basic service, you'll need a four-door car, minivan or truck that sits four passengers plus a driver. And it can't be too beat up − no major cosmetic damage and it must be able to pass vehicle inspection. You can't get the gig with a taxi, police or other marked vehicle or full-size van.

Local vehicle regulation can trip you up. In addition to Uber's minimum requirements, your city will have its own regulations for vehicles. Sign up on Uber to get more information.

Uber will lease you a vehicle. If you qualify as a driver but your vehicle isn't up to snuff, renting or leasing a vehicle through Uber might be the solution to send you on your way.

You can work for Uber on scooter too. Uber has a delivery service, and some of the possible vehicles are bikes and scooters (they'll also take cars, usually).

Dream job alert: Get paid $10,000 per month to 'experience' Cancun

Love to travel? Looking for a new job? 

A new job posting by Cancun.com might be just what you’re looking for. 

>> Read more trending news 

The travel site is seeking a social media savvy CEO, or a “Cancun Experience Officer.”

A description of the position online notes that the company is looking for “an outgoing, authentic and dynamic individual (or team) to represent the amazing destination of Cancun.”

The CEO will live in Cancun between March and August 2018, developing video of the vacation, capturing photos and creating written content. The CEO will be the face of the Cancun.com brand and its newly launched website.

Salary is listed at $10,000 per month -- and that doesn’t include the housing costs that will be completely paid for during the six-month period.

“You’ll get paid to dive into the culture, charm and wonder of Cancun and share your experiences with a worldwide audience,” the posting reads. 

“We can’t wait to get started on our search for a CEO to be the face and personality of Cancun. Getting paid to live and travel around Mexico is a once in a lifetime experience,” Chad Meyerson, general manager at Cancun.com, said in a press release. “It’s truly one of the most remarkable travel destinations, and we want to make sure we find the right person to help us show the rest of the world everything Cancun has to offer, from the culture and community to its beautiful hotels and pristine beaches.”

According to the press release, other perks include: 

  • Sleeping in luxurious beds overlooking the most pristine beaches
  • Scaling 3,000-year-old pyramids followed by a swim with a 40,000-pound whale shark
  • Sipping an ice-cold beverage before teeing off 200 yards down an ocean fairway
  • Mingling with locals and tourists at your VIP table in the hottest clubs
  • Coordinating charitable projects with local organizations to support education, health and well-being 
  • Having the most enviable job on the planet

Interested job seekers have until Dec. 17 to apply. A minute-long video describing why you’d be the perfect fit for the position is required.

The top five finalists will travel to Cancun in January, and the winner or winners will be announced Jan. 31. 

Apply here

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